Eliminating pet odor from Hades

24 Replies

I have a rental that is out of the area. We had to evict some non-paying tenants sometime back and the property manager told me that they had more dogs and cats that I feel comfortable mentioning in an open forum. We hired someone to clean the house,  to clean the floors, painted the entire house and put down floating vinyl planks. The property manager told me that there was an older still in the house. I told her to buy some older absorbers. The older absorbers did not do the job. I ordered and had sent to the property manager a $300 ozone machine. Since the property was only a two bedroom I figured the ozone machine would knock out all odors no time flat. The property manager ran the ozone machine for close to three weeks straight. She has now informed me that the odor are you still there or has came back. 
Is there something that can be done without having to take up the floating vinyl planks and removing the subfloor? I’m open to suggestions.

@Joe S. Your PM was really neglectful if they did not examine the subfloor-it should have been given several coats of Kilz or replaced. Sometimes you have to replace the bottom foot of drywall and new baseboards too. You might try the ozone machine again. Now that the new floor is down I hope you don't have to tear it up. Pets need proper owners or they can be a disaster. I'll be your PM was not inspecting. Mine did not; that's why I know what I know, and she is no longer.

A couple things to note:

1. The odor can be stuck behind trim or in the subflooring. As mentioned, the subfloor should have been painted with an oil-based primer that seals in the odor. If that was not done, you may not be able to eliminate the odor.

2. Running an ozone for three weeks is ridiculous. You run the machine for 12 hours, air the space out for 12. Rinse and repeat. I've found the odor sometimes gets worse after the first try but you can usually eliminate in after 2-3 tries. If it's still there, then you probably have an issue in the subflooring where the ozone generator can't reach.

Has anyone ever used anti icky poo? I read someone testified that this was an amazing product. I’m having a hard time seeing how it would be useful unless I pulled up the vinyl plank and applied it to the subfloor.

Originally posted by @Nathan G. :

A couple things to note:

1. The odor can be stuck behind trim or in the subflooring. As mentioned, the subfloor should have been painted with an oil-based primer that seals in the odor. If that was not done, you may not be able to eliminate the odor.

2. Running an ozone for three weeks is ridiculous. You run the machine for 12 hours, air the space out for 12. Rinse and repeat. I've found the odor sometimes gets worse after the first try but you can usually eliminate in after 2-3 tries. If it's still there, then you probably have an issue in the subflooring where the ozone generator can't reach.

As far as the ozone machine running 12 hours then aired out 12 and then you rinse and repeat that is the first time I’ve heard that.  So are you saying running the ozone straight doesn’t help without airing it out?

Originally posted by @Joe S. :
As far as the ozone machine running 12 hours then aired out 12 and then you rinse and repeat that is the first time I’ve heard that.  So are you saying running the ozone straight doesn’t help without airing it out?

You should read up on how the ozone generator works. You have to close the doors and windows to seal the space up as best as possible. Run the ozone generator for 8 - 12 hours. If you have a large space, you may need to run the generator in several areas to treat the entire space. After it has run, you open all the doors and windows, turn on some fans, and air the place out as best you can. 

In my experience, I run the generator for 12 hours overnight and then air it out in the morning. I go back in the afternoon to check. If there's still some odor, I'll do it a second time. That's not necessary in most applications. I recently had a rare situation where the ozone generator seemed to make the odor worse, even after airing out the unit! I ran it a second time and the odor was still atrocious, but then I aired it out for three hours and the odor was completely gone. Completely!

Be sure to read the safety precautions. You should NEVER operate the ozone generator in an occupied space and you shouldn't be in the same room while it's running. It is dangerous and can cause damage to the respiratory system. Turn it on and get out within 1-2 minutes. It's usually safe after the machine finishes running, but I still don't recommend staying in the space for more than a couple minutes until it's been properly aired out. 

 

@Joe S.

If it has central HVAC you should have the vents cleaned, replace the filter, and make sure that is not circulating the smell.

The ozone is good but make sure you are taking breaks and airing it out. Also turn on the furnace while you run it. Run it and then open windows and doors.

@Joe S.

Yes it works. But I treated the subfloor with it. Really soaked it multiple times. Baseboard and some sheet rock as well. Then I installed my finish floor. And I was running ozone at night!

Originally posted by @Max T. :

@Joe S.

Yes it works. But I treated the subfloor with it. Really soaked it multiple times. Baseboard and some sheet rock as well. Then I installed my finish floor. And I was running ozone at night!

 Do you think it works better than oil based kilz?

Update. So I had someone go back to the house remove all the vinyl plank flooring bleach the floors and paint the  subfloor three coats with oil base kiltz.  The property manager says it still smells just not as bad. I’m kind of at a loss at this point. 

I think there is a high likelihood that there is spray on the baseboards and you may need to replace some drywall.  Another option that may not be as popular is accept this as a pet friendly rental.  Hopefully you can get some better renters that will take care of their animals but allow a family with a cat or 2 move in.  The house already has a pet smell but they are probably used to it since they have one and may not be as turned off by it.  

Originally posted by @Adam Martin :

I think there is a high likelihood that there is spray on the baseboards and you may need to replace some drywall.  Another option that may not be as popular is accept this as a pet friendly rental.  Hopefully you can get some better renters that will take care of their animals but allow a family with a cat or 2 move in.  The house already has a pet smell but they are probably used to it since they have one and may not be as turned off by it.  

This is what I mentioned early on in the discussion. If it's cat urine, they will spray against the wall and it can run behind trim and baseboard. Renting it to pet owners that may not mind the smell is probably the only option for now. 

You have to be careful with cats. When one cat sprays, the next cat may also want to spray. It can create a never-ending pattern. 

I am not familiar with this product but it is out here, someone mentioned it in this forum is called "odor exit" look into it might be what you are looking for. Good luck

Originally posted by @Joe S. :

Has anyone ever used anti icky poo? I read someone testified that this was an amazing product. I’m having a hard time seeing how it would be useful unless I pulled up the vinyl plank and applied it to the subfloor.

I saw your title and came here to recommend that exact product! I am in Florida so our subfloor are concrete. We had an inherited tenant with small dogs that used the carpet so much that it was eating into the concrete. Green sludge. The carpet and pad were basically liquid.

After several rounds of the enzyme scrub with a deck brush, letting it sit, and rinsing thoroughly, the smell went away and the floor was good for the LVP.  We used a moisture barrier under the cork.  No problems at all left.  I am glad they just went on the floor and I didn't have to cut drywall out!

We also had to wash the walls with TSP and use Oil-based KILLZ paint on the walls because of the smoking. 2 sets of tenants later and nobody has mentioned any smells.

It sounds like you will definitely have to pull the floor up and start over.  If the new floor hasn't been soaked, you can probably just put it back down again.

Pics loaded out of order.


EDIT*

Just saw your update -- It sounds like you may have to take a look at the drywall, too. .  .  Have you put new baseboards in?  If not, I recommend plastic when you do -- they don't soak up smell like wood -- even painted wood.



Originally posted by @Nathan G. :
Originally posted by @Adam Martin:

I think there is a high likelihood that there is spray on the baseboards and you may need to replace some drywall.  Another option that may not be as popular is accept this as a pet friendly rental.  Hopefully you can get some better renters that will take care of their animals but allow a family with a cat or 2 move in.  The house already has a pet smell but they are probably used to it since they have one and may not be as turned off by it.  

This is what I mentioned early on in the discussion. If it's cat urine, they will spray against the wall and it can run behind trim and baseboard. Renting it to pet owners that may not mind the smell is probably the only option for now. 

You have to be careful with cats. When one cat sprays, the next cat may also want to spray. It can create a never-ending pattern.

Yup we have had to also take out some stud material..  and one house we just had to bull doze the whole thing  LOL..  sounds like a new sub floor new insulation new sheet rock and trim boards.. once you have them all off you can tell if some of the studs need to be replaced.. or floor joice 

 

I wanted to chime in here having had to deal with pet urine recently, though mine was minor and on porcelain tile (exactly why I chose tile for this unit)! Urine odor is caused by urea crystals and their break down into ammonia. Ozone works on odors that can be oxidized like smoke and mildewy type smells, but urea cannot be oxidized the same way. So your ozone machine is likely not doing much for your situation other than removing other pet smells like their general scent etc. You need an enzymatic product like the ones mentioned above which will break the urea down, then the ozone generator can help eliminate the lingering residual odors. 

At this point it sounds like you may have made your situation worse in that if you've painted over everything the enzyme cleaners may not be able to penetrate and break down the smells effectively. You need to start by taking things apart and cleaning until you've reached all the sources, and then and only then start putting things back and painting to seal whatever odor is left. At this point I'd start cutting some drywall areas out to investigate if the smell is in there as well as getting the enzyme cleaners. You'll need to spray the cleaners and soak everything so it can get into crack and crevices where the urine may be and keep them moist if possible because the enzymes are destroyed by drying out. Once that's done start using the ozone and painting as you put things back.

Now the property manager is saying the smell is getting better. I’m not sure what their definition of getting better is. Does pet Pee smell ever go away with time?

We bought a lake house that had 19 cats in it. Carpet was stripped out before we bought it , when we looked at it The ammonia smell would knock you down. All I can say is that realtor was a trooper she stayed in there as long as we wanted. I finally asked her if she wanted to step out on the porch.  I called my painter friend and he told me to  spray everything 3 ft down with bleach water to take our time and special attention to the door jambs . He said cats would spray those areas heavy. we sprayed it down twice and let it dry, including floors. (wood) kiltz everything and then covered it with flooring, laminate and carpets .  it eliminated the odor, has been rented multiple times since then.   i do use ozone machines in houses all the time , I usually just let them run until im done with the house. most of my work is done on weekends. So machines run all week. mostly smoke, musky smells or houses that have been shut up for extended periods of time. mostly foreclosures that have been setting for a few years . By the way that Realtor was my realtor on every deal until she retired. She earned that status with me.

Originally posted by @Joe S. :

Now the property manager is saying the smell is getting better. I’m not sure what their definition of getting better is. Does pet Pee smell ever go away with time?

Feel free to message me 

I’ll tell you what worked for me in what sounds like the exact same situation 

I don’t want to post in this thread as it goes 100% against what some of the ‘experts’ here state as facts 


I don’t want to get banned 



 

Originally posted by @Michael Plante :
Originally posted by @Joe S.:

Now the property manager is saying the smell is getting better. I’m not sure what their definition of getting better is. Does pet Pee smell ever go away with time?

I Did PM you earlier, but haven’t heard back yet.

Feel free to message me 

I’ll tell you what worked for me in what sounds like the exact same situation 

I don’t want to post in this thread as it goes 100% against what some of the ‘experts’ here state as facts 

I don’t want to get banned 



 

 

We had a similar problem when we inherited heavy smokers & 2 large caged dogs. I doubt if the poor dogs ever went outside. Being MTM we terminated them & I literally had to remove the drywall & insulation to get rid of the invasive smoke odor in the walls. The windows were replaced as the nicotine was so thick it stained the vinyl. Although my wife had attempted to scrape it off with a blade.

The subfloor was 3/4 inch plywood & soaked in pet urine so we drenched it in shellac & after several days in mid summer heat the odor was gone. The entire bathroom was also gutted as the black mold on the walls, ceiling & shower stall crevices was too thick to simply remedy. Sadly they had 2 children under 4 in that apartment who had lived in it since birth.

Originally posted by @Michael Plante :
Originally posted by @Joe S.:

Now the property manager is saying the smell is getting better. I’m not sure what their definition of getting better is. Does pet Pee smell ever go away with time?

Feel free to message me 

I’ll tell you what worked for me in what sounds like the exact same situation 

I don’t want to post in this thread as it goes 100% against what some of the ‘experts’ here state as facts 

I don’t want to get banned 



 

I did send you a personal message like you said. You got my hopes all up that you would share your secret sauce on eliminating pet odor. Please respond :-)