Looking to split a 2 on 1 in La Jolla, possible cloud condo?

4 Replies | San Diego, California

Hi all!  I have a 2 on 1 in La Jolla (both are the same - 2BR/1BA, attached garage, 875 sq') and I'm looking to split the lot. If not that, then I would like to cloud condo the 2 properties so I could sell them seperately down the road once I add second stories to them (that's a whole 'nother thread!).

They are both on their own lots according to the assessor, they were just developed as a 2 on 1 back in the 40's before developers realized the City of SD would become land owner's enemy #1. Set backs are not proper, one water meter serves both properties, and sewer for one runs under the other house.

I know I'm in for something close to $50K in engineering and filing fees to do this, but my question is: is anyone familiar with engineering /architecture firms here that are pros as far as getting this done, ie, it's what they do? 

Thanks in advance for any insight!

@Bob Johnson I work here locally doing land use/planning and site civil. Personally you may not have as much of an issue as you think....i.e. I would go in for your water/sewer first without initiating the discretionary processing. After that file for a lot segregation with the County Assessor. FYI if you have legal lots, you may not NEED any discretionary processing through the City and can deed them off without a discretionary review. If you're able to go that route you can proceed with your Coastal Permit/Planned Development permit afterwards without the hangups about setbacks ect.

Also....on those old railroad lots your legal setbacks are 3' for substandard lot widths. So again...maybe not really the problem you might think it is.

Matt - That's great info, thank you!  Regarding water & sewer, I assume contact SD Water first and tell them my plans?  I assume they tell me to get a contractor to add a meter (looks easy) and run independent sewer outflows from each house (might involve an act of Congress)?

And they are legal lots, tax assessor even notates it on my bill. That part I can just follow the bouncing ball on with them.


Originally posted by @Matt Devincenzo :

@Bob Johnson I work here locally doing land use/planning and site civil. Personally you may not have as much of an issue as you think....i.e. I would go in for your water/sewer first without initiating the discretionary processing. After that file for a lot segregation with the County Assessor. FYI if you have legal lots, you may not NEED any discretionary processing through the City and can deed them off without a discretionary review. If you're able to go that route you can proceed with your Coastal Permit/Planned Development permit afterwards without the hangups about setbacks ect.

Also....on those old railroad lots your legal setbacks are 3' for substandard lot widths. So again...maybe not really the problem you might think it is.

@Bob Johnson you'll need to process a right of way (ROW) permit for the water/sewer work in the street. The link below has a link to the City's info bulletin about these plan requirements.

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/dsdib...

The City doesn't provide water/sewer or any ROW improvements for residents unless it is due to a failure or damage. So you will need to permit and construct these items on your end. As far as telling anyone anything....less info is better. Your plan is to provide separate water/sewer for your two legal lots, and leave it at that. The counter review staff are not sophisticated land use/planning experts, their job is to review the engineering acceptability of what you're proposing. Telling them too much they will start throwing what "you're supposed to do" in to the conversation....whether that is accurate to this specific case or not.

As far as the parcel segregation, you could actually apply for that any time in theory. I had a project where the client submitted to segregate three legal lots into three tax parcels, while there was still a building across all three lots. So having a separate tax parcel doesn't create a legally salable property. You already have legally salable lots, you just are completing the steps to actually sell them separately. In the previous client's case he submitted for the three tax parcel's, but has to wait to make a sale until the building is demo'd because the title company won't insure title due to the existing 'encroachment' of a building covering the property. In your case you are just waiting until you finish the separate utility items.

Hope that helps