efficiency units within existing Triplex

8 Replies

We recently acquired a whole sale deal, that is a legal triplex.  1 floor has 2 units, with each unit having 2 doors and 2nd floor has 1 unit with 2 doors. The units are little too big and our developer says we should convert the unit to four efficiency units downstairs (each one having its own door and kitchenette) and two standard units upstairs (with full kitchen). I asked our developer regarding legality of it as we can't add more kitchens than permitted by law. We were told Kitchenette are not considered kitchens and as long as we provide enough parking for all the units, we should be fine. Any suggestions ?

Originally posted by @Andrew Johnson :

What’s it zoned?

 Tax records say - 

Zoning R4 
Property Class R3-Residential Lots 

@Basu G. You'll have to look up what that actually means in the city where you're looking to buy the property.  I'm no developer but I don't think it's a quick process to go from 3 units to 6 units.  Maybe you just do it with a simple variance there?   I know in some areas there's local appetite to "grandfather in" the unpermitted "granny flats".  But in those areas you can decide to take one large granny flat and just split it up into efficiency apartments.  What this all boils down to is who is the "we" that you reference in "we were told"?  Someone from the city?  Your neighbor?  Can Walter who lives next door and doesn't want cars cluttering up his street decide to object to this? 

I would imagine parking is an issue. Do yo have enough? If you can convert I would think larger units on the first floor would be the better choice for occupancy.

Accessory dwelling units (ADU), as they are called in Fulton, are fine, all other muni code aside, as long as they don't have a stove.

Fair warning, you are attracting lower quality tenants, unless you are in an A neighborhood, college area, or plan for vacation rentals (I have a couple units like this).  Your turnover and trouble tenants will be much higher. 

Originally posted by @Andrew Johnson :

@Basu G. You'll have to look up what that actually means in the city where you're looking to buy the property.  I'm no developer but I don't think it's a quick process to go from 3 units to 6 units.  Maybe you just do it with a simple variance there?   I know in some areas there's local appetite to "grandfather in" the unpermitted "granny flats".  But in those areas you can decide to take one large granny flat and just split it up into efficiency apartments.  What this all boils down to is who is the "we" that you reference in "we were told"?  Someone from the city?  Your neighbor?  Can Walter who lives next door and doesn't want cars cluttering up his street decide to object to this? 

 A developer, who has done something like this and working on this project told us it might be a better idea to do it this way. We would do this only if it is legal 

Originally posted by @Nicholas L. :

Fair warning, you are attracting lower quality tenants, unless you are in an A neighborhood, college area, or plan for vacation rentals (I have a couple units like this).  Your turnover and trouble tenants will be much higher. 

 Thanks for the inputs @Nicholas. The area is close to Mosley park. Both the floors are little more than 2000 sq ft and we think it would be better to find tenants who work in the city or students that go to colleges in the area. Downstairs has 4 doors, so it might be a good fit for a 4 efficiency units, while upstairs, we are thinking 1 larger and 1 smaller unit. 

There is enough parking, with at least one parking spot for each unit if we were to do a total of 6 in this one. I will look up regarding ADU.

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