Does the bank take the mailbox?

14 Replies

I've found several distressed properties with no mailbox. Upon doing a little research, they all seem to be in foreclosure. Is it the bank that removes the mailbox, and why?

No idea bud, but I have never heard of a bank taking a mailbox. Maybe the prior owners had post office boxes, or maybe the neighbors took it because theirs was in bad shape. Do all the other houses on the block have mailboxes?

I have been in hundreds of bank owned properties. Most of which all still have a mailbox.

Interesting. I started removing mailboxes from new acquired houses some years ago. Thought I was the only investor who did that.

Here's my (crazy?) logic:

If former owner's mail is continued to be delivered, owner might be inclined to want to return and pick up the mail and be tempted to re-enter or who-knows-what?

Removal forces mail delivery to be either held at the local post office or the former owner to provide postal service with a change of address form. I don't want that to be my problem.

Second, I'm less likely to see junk mail (sorry, direct marketing pieces) like the Pennysaver and attorney solicitations overflow and cause litter. This litter can be a tip-off to others that the house is vacant and like a sign that says, 'take my copper!' Or, 'break in and live here at night!'

When I resell, after rehabbing, I put a brand-new, shiny mailbox that tells the prospective buyers, welcome!

@Rick Harmon, thanks for the response. I just sign up for your newsletter about an hour ago. I thought the reason(s) were similar to your thoughts, but all of these houses are not yet REOs, so who takes them?

So, the common element is that each of these properties is in default with their lender?

Same lender?

Same zip code?

Rogue mail carrier's idea of redirected anger?

We can speculate until the cows come home (here comes one now!) however we'll need more input. Keep us informed, please.

So maybe they are different lenders, but what about same property preservation company working for those lenders? Could be only one or two preservation companies in the area, so all the lenders use them and they have a standard preservation plan/check list that they use.

If you need a mail box, you might check the flea markets!

Banks do not take mail boxes, I'm sure as that would not be a good practice. :)

Updated over 5 years ago

Unless the mailbox is built into a structure a mailbox is personal property, that's not usually considered as part of the property so the bank has no collateral interest. Depends on how it is attached, if removal would harm the property. :)

Originally posted by @Rick H. :
Interesting. I started removing mailboxes from new acquired houses some years ago. Thought I was the only investor who did that.

Here's my (crazy?) logic:

If former owner's mail is continued to be delivered, owner might be inclined to want to return and pick up the mail and be tempted to re-enter or who-knows-what?

Removal forces mail delivery to be either held at the local post office or the former owner to provide postal service with a change of address form. I don't want that to be my problem.

Second, I'm less likely to see junk mail (sorry, direct marketing pieces) like the Pennysaver and attorney solicitations overflow and cause litter. This litter can be a tip-off to others that the house is vacant and like a sign that says, 'take my copper!' Or, 'break in and live here at night!'

When I resell, after rehabbing, I put a brand-new, shiny mailbox that tells the prospective buyers, welcome!

Makes great sense. I think in one of the BP podcasts someone said receiving mail to the home gives squatters the right to be there.

I have seen this before. I am not sure how common it is but banks may be asking specific servicers or asset management companies to do it, or post offices may be requesting it (one mailman asked me to do it) when the homes are abandoned. This way they know not to deliver mail there but to return everything.

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