HELP with Chinese Drywall

10 Replies

I am looking at a property that has a lot of potential where I can get it for a good price. The house is already gutted to the walls and studs. My question is this: If I redo the drywall, change electrical and plumbing pipes, am I running into difficulty to sell the house after it was completed? 

There is a certification program for Chinese drywall remediation.  Don't know how good or expensive it is, but it makes buyers more comfortable.  A/C and heating coils may need replacing.

@Alin Toncz It is an EPA issue, someone on a safety training during our certification on renovating with lead mentioned about this, they said that a certified contractor will need to do the job. I don't recall anything more on the conversation but it should give you enough to do some further research. I would get a remediation/abatement certificate to easier sell it, just like any other abatement problems.

Thanks a lot Manolo. I am getting help from my realtor who has lots of connections with these type of contractors. Looking forward to getting the house bought, worked on and flipped *hot as a pancake"......

Stigmatized property! Though remediated, there is a percentage of buyers that won't touch it. Some argue the problems can linger and others argue that once remediated the problem is solved. Two different attorneys I know have differing views: one states it must be disclosed forever, and the other states no disclosure required if remediated. Me? I don't know who to believe.................

Scott Carder,

The reason i asked the question is that if you resell the house after remediation, you have to disclose in the selling contract that the house had CDW originally installed on it. Some buyers are scared of these type of houses no matter what you do; some want to see the extent of the damage via "before" pictures and what was done to correct the issue, with description from the remediation company accompanied by a certificate with the "after" pictures. Some homes require the AC evaporator coil to be replaced, some require electrical wire inspection and possible wire replacement and some buyers demand an inspection of copper piping (if the house has any). I hope I made myself a bit more explicit. 

Thanks 

@Alin Toncz , I think @Scott Carder doesn't really know what chinese drywall is, or he is only thinking a drywall coming from china being installed, lol. If you're gutting out, it's much more cheaper to install new electrical, ac, and plumbing system both to increase price and have buyer comfort in buying. Just my take. Disclosure: no selling experience.

Originally posted by @Manolo D. :

Alin Toncz , I think Scott Carder doesn't really know what chinese drywall is, or he is only thinking a drywall coming from china being installed, lol. If you're gutting out, it's much more cheaper to install new electrical, ac, and plumbing system both to increase price and have buyer comfort in buying. Just my take. Disclosure: no selling experience.

 I understand fully what the Chinese drywall debacle was. I didn't know that you had to do anything if the place was fully stripped

@Scott Carder You need to, remediation is key, it will not only affect the drywall, it goes to the studs, plumbing, electrical, vents, etc. Remediation certificate is the only thing that can come really close to anything that will at least give someone comfort in buying.