Flooring in my first flip

15 Replies

I am closing on my first flip house in the Houston area on Thursday. It's a 3/2 in a pretty nice, standard mid-range community built in the late 70's. the ARV is $175K. I work for a flooring company and can get the material and labor myself, but am not sure if I should use a mid range vinyl plank for around $1/sf or WPC waterproof click product with a foam backing which is a step up and looks a little bit nicer but also costs about 3 times as much. Would it be worth it to spend the extra money on a little better of a product? It's probably $2K vs $5-6K

Hey Chris,

Since you have a source to get your flooring cheaper, and you can do the labor, I would definitely step-up and upgrade the flooring because your 5k floor, is somebody else's 8k floor. 

The upgraded flooring will also bring you a faster sale, and you will feel better and the value you are passing on to your buyer!

Good Luck!

Bill

Thank you, Bill.  Much appreciated

I would do a bit nicer glue down lvt.. not a huge fan of the click products

@Chris Drumm , what @Tommy Hopkins asked is really the key question. If you've already determined an accurate ARV, I assume you've seen the comps. You need to determine what the comps are using and make your decision accordingly.

That said, what flooring store do you work for?  A mom and pop size organization?  I only ask because I managed a profit center for Lumber Liquidators for about 2 years and I was able to get 4 and 5 mm click vinyl for $1.59 before employee discount.  You might consider shopping around before just buying from your employer as, from the limited info provided here, your prices still sound a bit high to me.

Originally posted by @Chris Drumm :

I am closing on my first flip house in the Houston area on Thursday. It's a 3/2 in a pretty nice, standard mid-range community built in the late 70's. the ARV is $175K. I work for a flooring company and can get the material and labor myself, but am not sure if I should use a mid range vinyl plank for around $1/sf or WPC waterproof click product with a foam backing which is a step up and looks a little bit nicer but also costs about 3 times as much. Would it be worth it to spend the extra money on a little better of a product? It's probably $2K vs $5-6K

Hey, congrats on your first flip! I would also recommend checking out the comps (what's typical in the neighborhood on recent sales?) and your anticipated profit. This should be a purely biz decision, and if the nicer floor helps sell it faster, that might be the wise thing to do. I have access to the MLS if you don't.

Originally posted by @William Haltom :

Hey Chris,

Since you have a source to get your flooring cheaper, and you can do the labor, I would definitely step-up and upgrade the flooring because your 5k floor, is somebody else's 8k floor. 

The upgraded flooring will also bring you a faster sale, and you will feel better and the value you are passing on to your buyer!

Good Luck!

Bill

 I agree with William 100%  

Especially in a neighborhood with ARV in the $170s, buyers will expect more than glue down vinyl.

@Benjamin Ervin @Tommy Hopkins  @Aniekan Udoh Thanks for your feedback.  the comps are as follows 1)carpet,tile 2)tile, wood 3)laminate 4)laminate, tile.  I work for Redi Carpet (largest multi-family flooring company in US) and I can get materials and labor almost at cost.  The click product that I am referring to is a higher end waterproof one and it's actually $1.89 cost, the vinyl is $0.66 cost.  Maybe I was looking at too high of a pricepoint.  I won't be doing labor myself, I just get a great deal on it. The vinyl plank i was looking at is also a very nice product.  The home also has white ceramic tile currently in the kitchen which i may leave in that area.

When deciding what elements to spend money on for a flip, the best advice I received was:

"If you do this/don't do this, will it stop the house from selling?"  Will the quality of flooring be the determining factor in someone making an offer on the house?  

There are always "it would be nice to haves" that will cut into your profit margin.  Sometimes it's hard to step back and realize the house we are flipping is not for us.  I  am not recommending cheap materials and cheap workmanship - after all, when flipping, we are not just renovating a house, we are creating someone's home.

I agree with Aniekan Udoh, stay in line with the comps.  

Have fun and good luck with your endeavors!  :0)

Thank you! @Constance Grandelli and thanks to everyone else for your feedback.  It has made me decide to spend a little extra to install better flooring to align with the comps.  

Dog pee will remain on subfloor for as long as one owns the home.  I like water proof hard laminated 12mm thick so you need not to saw off all existing door bottom. These thinner stock is flimsy.....

Hi Chris, jumping in a little bit late to this one, but another way to look at the floor issue is that is this a way to help your flip stand out among other similar houses in the area. The extra cost does not seem like much in the grand scheme of things and the only way we'd say not to do it is if every other house in the area had the cheapest vinyl. Probably not the case. Also think about other small things that can make your house stand out among the competition. Small things like better appliances (usually only about $1000 more total), higher end drawer pulls on cabinets, etc. Hope that helps!

Does it have pet (dog, cat) pee after you remove the flooring? I like 13mm plank with foam. The laminated is $1.79/sf + foam backing.  A little spongy but it serves as a water and pee odor barrier. It attenuates noise with the popcorn ceiling all removed.

Gray or black is popular these days in west coast.

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