J. Scott's Book on Estimating Rehab Costs - Spreadsheet?

14 Replies

Along with many others I'm sure, I read "The Book on Estimating Rehab Costs" by @J. Scott. Great book by the way so if you haven't gotten around to it, do so (it's a quick read). 

Since reading it I've felt like it needed a supplementary spreadsheet for easy reference and quick calculations (including entering your own numbers). I've been planning to put this together myself but haven't gotten around to it. Basically, I'm looking for an electronic version of the table that starts on page 201.

In the interest of saving myself some time and working smarter not harder, has anyone already done this?

Also, I can't seem to tag J on this post so if someone else could that would be appreciated. I'm guessing he may have already shared what I'm looking for but I missed it. Thanks.

Disclosure: Purchaser

@Lucas Pfaff

There is a rehab analysis spreadsheet here on BP. I also believe the J. Scott has an electronic version on his website. @J Scott please confirm.

Thank you for sharing;  Was also looking for this

I'm looking through the spreadsheet and I think it's worth mentioning that it's possible to spend a lot less for certain material items as well as labor in many cases depending on how frugal you want to be

interior door with hardware: $5-10 used, $30-50 new

window: $10-50 used, $100-200 new

light fixtures: $1-10 used, 6 pack flushmount at lowes for $44

fan fixture: $24-60 new

water heater: $250 new

toilet: $50-90 new

sink: $40-200 new 

faucet: $10-30 new

tile: 0.49-2/sqft new

appliance: $20-200 each appliance used

my last rehab was:

60 elec permit cost + 300 elec repair (tenant destroyed meter box causing house to be condemned)

1600 material + 1500 labor flooring for 1400 sqft

500 material + 600 labor spray paint whole house semigloss and patch some large holes

$30 for 4 interior doors which I put in

$10 mirror for bathroom

$100 paint porch, stairs, and stair rail brown

$50 fridge, $10 burner plates for stove

I also spent at least a few hundred with help on cleaning and taking out the trash and some other expenses here and there which altogether added up to about 5 thousand.

I spent maybe 30 hours over there in total on the weekends.

Disclosure: Author of the books being discussed.

Originally posted by @Jassem A.:

I'm looking through the spreadsheet and I think it's worth mentioning that it's possible to spend a lot less for certain material items as well as labor in many cases depending on how frugal you want to be


I think you're missing the point of that spreadsheet.  It is NOT intended to provide an estimate of what each of the things listed would cost.  It's just a template of how you can use a spreadsheet to analyze a deal.  The numbers in there are for a specific project I did years ago -- for example, where I list $300 for doors, that's probably the replacement of 4 interior doors...or perhaps one exterior door (I don't remember the specific project that I modeled this for).  

But, if you use this spreadsheet to determine how much things cost, I'm curious where you'll find windows for $0...  :)

Disclosure: Author of the books being discussed.

Originally posted by @Lucas Pfaff:

Along with many others I'm sure, I read "The Book on Estimating Rehab Costs" by @J. Scott. Great book by the way so if you haven't gotten around to it, do so (it's a quick read). 

Since reading it I've felt like it needed a supplementary spreadsheet for easy reference and quick calculations (including entering your own numbers). I've been planning to put this together myself but haven't gotten around to it. Basically, I'm looking for an electronic version of the table that starts on page 201.

In the interest of saving myself some time and working smarter not harder, has anyone already done this?

Hey Lucas,

If you purchase the books off BiggerPockets, it comes with a whole bunch of digital files that mirror what's in the books (including the table you're looking for).

I'm guessing you purchased the book off Amazon, so you wouldn't have gotten those digital files.  Feel free to shoot me a email (address in sig) and I can get those over to you...

@J Scott 

Yes I understood what the spreadsheet was conveying and that there was some materials provided in the labor section since it's difficult to know what the contractor spent on materials since most people pay after the job is done anyway.   I suppose it's more useful as a way to check things off the list and gauge how much you could spend or would like to spend.

@J Scott Email sent

Disclosure: Author of the books being discussed.

Originally posted by @Jassem A.:
I suppose it's more useful as a way to check things off the list and gauge how much you could spend or would like to spend.

Actually, the main purpose of the spreadsheet is the analysis provided on the left-hand side (columns B and C).  

The inclusion of the rehab estimate section was just to give an example of how to generate the values for Cells C13 and C14 of the analysis, and the information in the rehab estimate portion of the spreadsheet can be completely ignored.  I just included the rehab estimate portion of the spreadsheet as one example of how to do it -- you can generate those values any way you want, and don't need to use the rest of that spreadsheet at all.

I never intended for anyone to get any value out of the specific dollar values I have in those cells...they are essentially made up...

@J Scott J thanks for jumping in to take this one. Well put bro

Hi @J Scott , I bought your books thru Amazon.   Would you please send me the digital files?  Thank you in advance.  Mark Mattison

Join the Largest Real Estate Investing Community

Basic membership is free, forever.