Roofstock review. NEWBIES BEWARE!!

120 Replies

Looks like most of the reviews or case studies on Roofstock are about the closing process. I suppose since the vast majority of investors who’ve purchased properties from Roofstock use the properties as buy-and-hold rentals and Roofstock is a start-up that hasn’t been around for long, not a whole lot of investors have sold those properties. I got burnt on my way out when I tried to sell one acquired through Roofstock, which I’ve only kept for ~1.5 years. I wasted a lot of time and lost over 30K from this property. The only thing I gained is increased cancer risks from all that stress.

The short version of what happened:

A local flipper I befriended pointed out a serious undisclosed permitting issue he discovered from public record, which compelled me to sell the property at a discounted price to a local wholesaler instead of keeping it as a rental or selling on the MLS. The Roofstock inspection report made no mention of this issue. I have strong reasons to believe the seller chose not to disclose intentionally.

Due to the way the Roofstock purchase and sale agreement was drafted and certain provisions in Roofstock's Terms&Conditions that investors have to agree to but few actually read before using their website, the seller and Roofstock are well protected from liabilities, much better than a seller and brokers would in a typical MLS transaction scenario. As a result, I have very limited ways or no way of recourse.

Combined with some other things that have happened and my interactions with Roofstock, I feel that buying properties from Roofstock is like buying properties without a buyer’s agent, their “one stop for all” business model is inherently flawed, and the water is too deep for newbie buyers. The increased efficiency is achieved at the cost of buyers' best interests. 

Furthermore, despite Roofstock’s effort to find top providers to work with their investors, it looks like Roofstock struggles to bring all of them up to standards and keep them in check. The quality of service from different providers (title companies, PMs, inspectors) swing so widely that the good ones exceed my expectations, and the bad ones make me wonder how they stay in business or why hasn’t got taken out by the FTC. I’ve dealt with just as many bad ones as the good ones. In some cases, buyers have the options to pick the ones they prefer; in other cases just a hit or miss.

Last but not least, Roofstock advisors' excellent work ethics can’t compensate for their lack of knowledge of the local markets. On the other hand, lots of the sellers are institutional investors or local RE professionals, which inevitably shifts even more risks to newbie buyers.

This is a 1-star review for newbie buyers; 3-star review for seasoned buyers who know what to watch out for when evaluating deals; 5-star review for sellers, especially those who want to evade scrutinization from shrewd local brokers and failure-to-disclose-property-defects lawsuits.

Well, since I rate Roofstock 5 stars for sellers, why don't I just list it for sale on Roofstock? The simple answer is that the actual market rent ($900-965/mo) to list price ratio (ARV 120 -140K) would not be enticing to SFR buyers. The market rent Roofstock gave ($1025/mo) when I made the purchase was inflated btw.

I can post a long version to elaborate on the above-mentioned points if more than 10 people on BP are interested to know more. 

Originally posted by @JC Wu :

Looks like most of the reviews or case studies on Roofstock are about the closing process. I suppose since the vast majority of investors who’ve purchased properties from Roofstock use the properties as buy-and-hold rentals and Roofstock is a start-up that hasn’t been around for long, not a whole lot of investors have sold those properties. I got burnt on my way out when I tried to sell one acquired through Roofstock, which I’ve only kept for ~1.5 years. I wasted a lot of time and lost over 30K from this property. The only thing I gained is increased cancer risks from all that stress.

The short version of what happened:

A local flipper I befriended pointed out a serious undisclosed permitting issue he discovered from public record, which compelled me to sell the property at a discounted price to a local wholesaler instead of keeping it as a rental or selling on the MLS. The Roofstock inspection report made no mention of this issue. I have strong reasons to believe the seller chose not to disclose intentionally.

Due to the way the Roofstock purchase and sale agreement was drafted and certain provisions in Roofstock's Terms&Conditions that investors have to agree to but few actually read before using their website, the seller and Roofstock are well protected from liabilities, much better than a seller and brokers would in a typical MLS transaction scenario. As a result, I have very limited ways or no way of recourse.

Combined with some other things that have happened and my interactions with Roofstock, I feel that buying properties from Roofstock is like buying properties without a buyer’s agent, their “one stop for all” business model is inherently flawed, and the water is too deep for newbie buyers. The increased efficiency is achieved at the cost of buyers' best interests. 

Furthermore, despite Roofstock’s effort to find top providers to work with their investors, it looks like Roofstock struggles to bring all of them up to standards and keep them in check. The quality of service from different providers (title companies, PMs, inspectors) swing so widely that the good ones exceed my expectations, and the bad ones make me wonder how they stay in business or why hasn’t got taken out by the FTC. I’ve dealt with just as many bad ones as the good ones. In some cases, buyers have the options to pick the ones they prefer; in other cases just a hit or miss.

Last but not least, Roofstock advisors' excellent work ethics can’t compensate for their lack of knowledge of the local markets. On the other hand, lots of the sellers are institutional investors or local RE professionals, which inevitably shifts even more risks to newbie buyers.

This is a 1-star review for newbie buyers; 3-star review for seasoned buyers who know what to watch out for when evaluating deals; 5-star review for sellers, especially those who want to evade scrutinization from shrewd local brokers and failure-to-disclose-property-defects lawsuits.

Well, since I rate Roofstock 5 stars for sellers, why don't I just list it for sale on Roofstock? The simple answer is that the actual market rent ($900-965/mo) to list price ratio (ARV 120 -140K) would not be enticing to SFR buyers. The market rent Roofstock gave ($1025/mo) when I made the purchase was inflated btw.

What was the undisclosed permitting issue that the local flipper discovered from the public record?

Did you require the seller to complete the disclosure form prior to executing the PSA?

What due diligence did you personally do prior to executing the PSA?

Did you bring the permitting issue to the attention of Roofstock upon discovery?

What was the cost of remedying the permitting issue should you have chosen to do so?

Did you retain an attorney upon discovering the permitting issue in an effort to seek damages?

Why did you choose to sell the property vs keeping it as a buy and hold investment?

Why did you choose to sell the property to a wholesaler vs selling it on MLS?

What market was this property in and what was the purchase price?

@Jason Gines   Those are all great questions, Jason. I can certainly touch all of them in a long version of the story & analysis with ample details, but that would take me a while to write. No point to spend that much time if few people will read it. I'll answer your questions if more people are interested in learning the details. 

I notice that you comment on almost all Roofstock related posts usually to defend Roofstock. Are you affiliated with Roofstock in any way? Looks like there are investors that have established an advertising relationship with Roofstock, such as the ones who wrote Roofstock reviews on Listen Money Matters and The College Investor. 

Originally posted by @JC Wu :

@Jason Gines   Those are all great questions, Jason. I can certainly touch all of them in a long version of the story & analysis with ample details, but that would take me a while to write. No point to spend that much time if few people will read it. I'll answer your questions if more people are interested in learning the details. 

I notice that you comment on almost all Roofstock related posts usually to defend Roofstock. Are you affiliated with Roofstock in any way? Looks like there are investors that have established an advertising relationship with Roofstock, such as the ones who wrote Roofstock reviews on Listen Money Matters and The College Investor. 

I have no relationship with Roofstock other than as a customer.  I've purchased four properties utilizing Roofstock and maintain my own thread here on Bigger Pockets about my experiences with them and updates on the properties I've purchased through them.  There are posts seeking information on Roofstock regularly and I know that Bigger Pockets was an invaluable resource to me prior to purchasing my first property and continues to be so sharing my own experiences is a way for me to pay it forward.  You've made a lot of general statements about Roofstock without specifics.  I do not see how anyone can use your experience as a guide without specifics to learn from.  I'm not sure if you will receive ten responses requesting specifics at this time, but I would imagine that over time if you share specifics people that search for Roofstock both using Google and Bigger Pockets will be able to use a more detailed post from you about your experience to better guide them on whether they wish to use Roofstock or not.  

I would be interested in hearing more details, and answers to Jason's questions. I too have followed Jason's journey closely and found it to be very helpful information when dealing with Roofstock. I am in middle of writing a review myself based on my recent experience. 

Cliff hanger..... don't keep the good stuff from us. This is a community that thrives on information, details, and numbers. We gather to hear of others experiences, ventures, opinions, thoughts, and most importantly the details relating to them. With that being said I would also like to hear the details as I am already this invested in the story, but it might never happen because I am only request number 5. 

I’d be interested in learning the details and answers to Jason’s questions.  The more we all know, both pros and cons, would better aid in each of us coming up with our own conclusions and future decisi

I would like to know more details too. Not necessarily around roof stock but:

1. Why not sell via mls?

2. Why not correct code violations created by unpermitted work?

3. why not hold the property?

I realize that city may not issue and sign off on other permits until code violations are corrected (learned that the hard way).

Originally posted by @JC Wu :

I can post a long version to elaborate on the above-mentioned points if more than 10 people on BP are interested to know more. 

 You have your more than 10 people.  

Here’s the first half of the long story, focused on the permitting issue and this particular property. I can answer Jason’s remaining questions focused on Roofstock, the contractual terms, local broker’s insight, etc in a later post, probably in a few weeks, as this post is already verbose. I just used Jason’s questions as a template. The order of the questions has been rearranged for a better flow.

I have not reached out to Roofstock about this undisclosed permitting issue, because I don’t plan to seek recourse from them or the seller and there’s nothing left to be intervened. The reasons can be explained in details in the second half of the long story. Somebody from Roofstock relayed a vague message saying they’ll respond to my correspondence from a while back about a separate issue. I haven’t heard from them, they probably forgot about it, and I don’t feel like following up. It’s a thing of the past. I doubt it has anything to do with this permitting issue.

1. What market was this property in and what was the purchase price?

Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida. The seller bought the property in 2015 for 29K. I bought it in 2017 for 95K before taking into account the closing costs. The seller rehabbed the property, kept it as a rental for about a year and then sold to me. I sold it to the wholesaler in Feb 2019 for 107K. The property was built in 1956. Roofstock certified.

Here’re the market value estimates from different sources around the time I sold it:

Roofstock: 118K - 136K

Zillow: 134K

Redfin: 149K

The wholesaler’s (my buyer) Facebook ad comps: 150K

I entered the right market but bought the wrong property from the wrong seller. The Jacksonville market is pretty hot right now, and the property has appreciated quite a bit.

The 30K+ of loss I mentioned in the original post is the total amount lost from this property. I only accounted for about 5K of loss of profit from this permitting issue/sold at discount, but it could be anywhere between 5K to 40K. The other ~25K is related to tenant issues.

2. What was the undisclosed permitting issue that the local flipper discovered from the public record?

Full roof replacement. There’s a lot more to it, it’s not just about a roof. The ramifications that stemmed from it were complicated. The discovery of the unpermitted roof was the trigger.

Based on the property’s price history and market value trends, I speculate it was in a run-down condition that needed a complete rehab when the seller acquired it in 2015. A 4-pt inspection I ordered for insurance purpose seems to confirm this. The 4-pt inspection report indicated that all the major systems were updated around 2015. I checked the permit history of this property on the City of Jacksonville Building Inspection Division website. It only shows two permits for this property: “roof permit pulled in 1991” and “existing building (not sure what that means) permit pulled in 2001”. I assume permits pulled before 1991 aren’t on electronic record. The website doesn’t show any permit pulled in 2015. After seeing this, I immediately started to wonder what other work performed in 2015 was also unpermitted.

On top of that, I was very concerned about the quality of the rehab work the seller did based on my knowledge of the seller’s shady and despicable conduct. The seller isn’t an individual, it’s a company that engages in all sorts of real estate activities. The seller did some other work for me after selling me the property, which turned out to be a total disaster. Looks like they even brazenly lied in writing against their own words from previous emails to rip me off a paltry couple hundred bucks. Later on, I found out they appeared to be committing fraud and doing illegal stuff.

I believe the seller is a plague on the local community, especially since it isn’t an affluent region, lots of the residents live paycheck to paycheck, numerous people complained about being ripped off. A lot of those people are financially vulnerable and lack resources to go against the seller. The seller also appears to be gaining unfair competitive advantage through cheating while many of its competitors earn recognition through hard work and serving the community.

I tried to warn others and posted online a screenshot of a consumer alert a website issued against the seller. The seller’s attorney sent me a threat letter before. I’m not a contentious type of person, but when my rights get infringed upon, I stand my ground and fight back to the end. I might have to anti-SLAPP and even sue them back for malicious prosecution or malicious use of process depending on what happens in the future. I sure hope the seller knows about the Streisand Effect and doesn’t act egregiously in the first place.

My logic goes, if the seller went so far to rip me off just a couple hundred bucks and they scam people, it would make sense for them to hire the cheapest labor, cut corners, use the cheapest material for the rehab in order to maximize their profit from the flip. It would also make sense for them to not pull permits to save on the permit application fees and finish the rehab asap without delay. Who knows how long the rehab work they did to this property would last, and when it’ll start to fall apart. But I do know that, when it starts to fall apart, I could be hit with some big-ticket items.

In hindsight, I should have hired a local inspector to do a super comprehensive and thorough inspection immediately after closing. In that way, If anything alarming came up and was too much for me to handle, I could benefit from the Roofstock 30-day money back guarantee and sell it right back to Roofstock. I don’t know if this is really feasible in practice though, and I certainly do not recommend abusing it. I think investors should only go for it if they really have solid reasons, otherwise, it’s just not a nice thing to do. Buyer’s remorse setting in is not a solid reason, for instance.

3. What was the cost of remedying the permitting issue should you have chosen to do so?

It is possible to permit after the fact. If I provide proof that I didn’t know about the issue, I might not even get fined. Laws regarding permits are local and vary from city to city. The cost of pulling one permit is usually only a couple hundred bucks.

Technically, a permit needs to be pulled for almost any major repair, like reroofing, repiping, rewiring, replacing HVAC system. But from what I’ve learned, the city of Jacksonville is stricter with certain types of repair work than others. For instance, they usually do not enforce swapping out a water heater without a permit, but they tend to make a bigger deal out of a full roof replacement without a permit.

But here is the catch. I risk opening a Pandora’s box by attempting to obtain a permit for the roof.

A code compliance inspector from the city would have to inspect the unpermitted structure and sign off on it. If the roof wasn’t installed properly, I might have to rip the entire thing off and redo with a permit. The roof is fairly new with a remaining useful life of as long as ten years according to the Roofstock inspection report. In addition, what if I attract unwanted attention to the other parts of the property that I strongly suspect aren’t permitted?  

I thought about hiring my own inspector to check out the property first to see whether it could pass a code compliance inspection, and then decide whether to contact the city or not. Here’s the problem. The inspector wouldn’t know for sure unless the floor gets busted up and drywall torn through.

The city of Jacksonville usually doesn’t do a good job at enforcing permits. I read some BP post discussions to get a better idea on permitting issues. A podcast guest on show #47, who’s also a broker, wrote that he had heard many horror stories where a buyer calls the city to get an idea of the city's attitude towards certain unpermitted structures, and the city says on the phone that everything is fine and after they buy the property they get hit with all these costs and fines. Since the guy was a podcast guest, I suppose he’s an expert. My takeaway from that post is do not count on the city to cut me some slack when they actually find out.

What about resale? Well, without me having to disclose, my then prospective buyers quickly found out on their own and interrogated me about it, asking it be reflected as a discount.

4. Why did you choose to sell the property vs keeping it as a buy and hold investment?

From my answers to the previous questions, you can tell that remedying the issue is tricky.

What about don’t remedy it and rent it out?

Insurance companies feel differently about unpermitted structures, many of which do not cover unpermitted structures or personal injuries caused by unpermitted structures. For those that don’t cover unpermitted structures, if the insured can prove that he/she had no prior knowledge and was not being negligent, the insurance company might still cover it. This is a grey area. To further complicate the matter, many insurance companies use wide blanket statements in the policy, so they have wiggle room to argue in court instead of telling people what exactly they insure or don’t insure.

The roof is at the mercy of mother nature, which hasn’t been very merciful to Jacksonville in recent years. During the short duration of my ownership, Jacksonville was under the influence of a category 5 hurricane and a category 4 hurricane: Irma in 2017 and Michael in 2018. I can imagine during a hurricane, the tenants huddle under the roof while the roof gets battered. If the roof wasn’t installed to meet safety standards, and crashes down, severely injures or kills the tenants, and the insurance company denies my claim, I’d be screwed.

I emailed my insurance agent, asking whether my insurer would deny a claim in this hypothetical scenario, she emailed back and said, “To answer your question about SFIC approving or denying a claim, I really can’t answer that question. The necessary steps to follow would be that a claim is filed by the insured via a call to the insurance claims department and then an investigation would be conducted by an insurance claims adjuster who would then make a decision as to whether the claim would be paid or not.”

My potential liability is further increased by my decision of not putting the property under an LLC when I bought it.

What about don’t remedy it and leave it vacant?

I thought about leaving it vacant and wait for it to appreciate over the next one to two years and then sell. You’ll find quite a few online articles that depict a very rosy outlook for the Jacksonville market, forecasting double-digit appreciation for 2019.

However, I think leaving a property vacant for too long is risky. During vacancy, I have to incur some costs, such as property tax, property management fees, insurance, and possibly property damages from break-ins. The community rating is only 2.5 star according to Roofstock. Moreover, I feel that the market is at its peak right now. Some brokers and flippers I’ve talked to share my sentiment. Who knows when the next recession will hit. One thing is for sure, once I detect some telltale signs, it’d be too late to act.

In conclusion, if I couldn’t remedy the issue, couldn’t use it as a rental without remedying the issue, couldn’t just hold a vacant property for years, then the only logical option left was to sell, to just get it off my back.

5. Why did you choose to sell the property to a wholesaler vs selling it on MLS?

Sell on the MLS:

When the home gets listed on the MLS, it would likely get hundreds or even thousands of views. I'd risk attracting unwanted attention to this permitting issue, and then it's the Pandora's box scenario again. Some nosy people might even rat me out to the code-compliance folks. Imagine the city sends out a code compliance inspector and orders me to do all those invasive things to the property, while it's on the market. That can't be good. Also, a buyer might request the issue to be remedied, which could hamper closing.

Sell to wholesaler:

Selling to the wholesaler as-is was more discreet and no hassle with repair requests.

I put my contact info on the public record when I bought the property, so I received unsolicited postcards in the mail from local wholesalers. I just called about a dozen of them, figured out they use the same formula to run numbers, their offers came close, I picked the second highest offer (the highest seemed a bit shady).

Here’re some other pros of selling to wholesalers: no agent commissions paid, buyer pays all cash, buyer pays all closing costs, no financing contingency, short inspection contingency (the wholesaler actually just walked the property before making an offer and that counted as the inspection), quick closing.

The cons of selling to wholesalers:

They offer below market value -- the 70% rule.

Many wholesalers got a bad rep. They basically practice real estate without a license.

The wholesaler eventually assigned the contract to another buyer and the title company did a double closing. Basically, the wholesaler flipped the contract/PSA and charged the end buyer an assignment fee.

In retrospect, I should have gone on several Jacksonville wholesaler’s Facebook pages to find out whom they market properties to, then compile my own buyer list and directly contact those end buyers. I could probably have walked away with a couple thousand dollars more.

6. What due diligence did you personally do prior to executing the PSA?

This is the first property I bought from Roofstock, and the first property I bought in my entire life, so I was a brand new newbie. My due diligence can be divided into two parts: on Roofstock and on the property.

My due diligence on Roofstock:

I looked up the founders. My logic went, if the founders/leaders are legitimate, the company and employees should also be good. I found out that the Roofstock CEO went to Stanford. A close family member of mine also went to Stanford. I myself worked on a Stanford research team. Roofstock CDO went to LSE. My family member’s co-founder also went to LSE, then to Stanford. The Roofstock CDO worked at Merrill Lynch for years; I’ve been a Merrill Lynch wealth management client for years. My family member’s startup also serves investors, but from a different sector. Some of Roofstock’s VC investors even approached my family member for the next funding round. These are hardly any real connection, but I have the tendency of trusting people who share things in common with me. I believe everybody has that tendency more or less.

I’m not a trusting person at all, but I trusted Roofstock. I believed and expected Roofstock to possess a sense of honor, integrity, decency, and abide by a set of moral and ethical rules. If I didn’t think highly of Roofstock, I wouldn’t have bought a second property from them about a year later.

My logic also went, if Roofstock is legitimate, the providers they recommend or certify should also be good, especially since Roofstock claims on their website that “we’ve found providers you can count on,” “rigorous certification means you can focus on your investment strategy rather than due diligence.” I assumed Roofstock had done more than enough due diligence on the providers for me, so I did not do much on my part besides checking out a few online reviews, which turned out to be a grave mistake. Roofstock providers is a juicy story for another day. Again, I think Roofstock tries hard to find the best ones, but it’s difficult for any business, not just Roofstock, to simultaneously juggle that many types of providers in that many states in that many communities. I gotta give Roofstock credit for finding the goods ones I’ve worked with though.

My due diligence on the property:

I checked out amenities around the property on Google Map. Grocery stores, day care centers, parks, restaurants, shopping malls, distance to downtown, major highways, etc. I checked Zillow and Redfin for price histories. I also checked citydatadotcom for the demographics of the population, the average income, and a bunch of other things pertaining to the local community as a whole. I went on homedisclosuredotcom to check for hazards, noise level, criminal offenders nearby, etc. And of course, all the documents in the Roofstock diligence vault. The Roofstock closing coordinator actually emailed me all the docs in a zip folder saying, “Please see attached a zip file of all the documents from the Diligence Vault.” Docs included are inspection report, house canary value report, insurance quote, but no disclosure form. Not embedded in the PSA either.

At the time of purchase, my biggest concern was actually the registered sex offender neighbor. The lease I inherited indicated there was only one female tenant. I was concerned about her safety and whether the resale value would be adversely affected by a neighbor like that. It turned out the sex offender was the least of my concern. It also turned out the tenant had unauthorized occupants living with her all along. Apparently, I fixated on the wrong issues.

As a rather clueless newbie, it never occurred to me that I should check permit record. Seller didn’t mention it, neither did Roofstock. Nobody reminded me to check. It kinda just slipped through the crack. I suspect there are other things I should have checked but didn’t know to check, and still don’t know to check. Maybe I dodged some bullets without even knowing about it by cashing out on this property.

I eventually realized that the onus of due diligence ultimately falls on the buyer, although it looks like failing to investigate permits is a common form of malpractice committed by buyers' agents for MLS transactions. I definitely should have done extensive research on the seller. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the other property I bought from Roofstock will remain good to me.

Writing reviews brings me closure, but more importantly, I hope by sharing my experience, you newbies out there can avoid paying some tuition. It’s not fun to be the one going through all that, and it certainly could have been a lot worse.

To be continued……..

Keep in mind that exiting any property after only owning it 1.5 yeas will virtually gurantee a financial loss. unless it appreciated a bunch.. also in many markets there is no permit for a reroof. 

@JC Wu

Thank you for sharing more details on your experience. It is useful to know that Roofstock does not verify if all work is permitted on the homes they sell, at least in this particular instance.

Just an observation, but you seem like someone who might benefit a great deal from using a real estate agent if you plan to invest in RE in the future. I don't always recommend using an agent, but it sounds to me like you could benefit from having someone to help you determine what is and is not a material defect in the property, and help guide you in making these decisions. It is commendable that you care about the safety of your tenants and neighbors, but it sounds like you spend a lot of time worrying about what could go wrong with your investments. Find a good agent, and let them eliminate some of that time and stress for you! Just my two cents.

@JC Wu I don't care if work is permitted, I care if it is done right.  Have you had a competent roofer check the roof?

You have made a number of assumptions that may simply not be true. You are presuming the "seller used the cheapest labor, cut corners and and used the cheapest materials." You don't know that.

When I hire a contractor I expect them to pull permits. Do they always do it. I doubt it. A licensed roofing contractor I trust completely, put a new roof on my personal home.  I don't know if he pulled a permit or not. Your seller may not have know either.

You can see the quality of the finish work on the job and you received an inspection report. If that was satisfactory then why are you concerned? I think you are making a big deal over a little issue. 

@Ned Carey   I'd rather be over cautious than not to be cautious enough, especially since I'm a newbie and the property is ~2700 miles away. When I make decisions, I only care about the worst case scenario and whether I can handle it or not, which involves asking "what if" questions. 

Roofstock inspection reports aren’t created equal. The report for this particular property is only 13 pages long including all the pics, not very detailed. Some Roofstock inspection reports are over 100 pages long. 

My then prospective buyers cared about the roof permit and factored into their offer amount. 

"The city of Jacksonville usually doesn’t do a good job at enforcing permits." 

- On the contrary - For instance, no AC contractor can have more than 5 open permits, so they like to get the permit, inspection, then closed so they can add new business. The City is really good at looking at permitted work.  

Appreciation for Jacksonville for 2019 should be a bit less than double-digit, then cool down next year as we enter a recession (2 quarters of successive declines in GDP). I believe the market is perfect for buy, fix and flip, I sold all of my rentals at the end of last year, so I got top dollar for those we held before the Great Recession. Its all a cycle. 

@Jeremy Z. Keen observation. I came to the same conclusion. I've made connections with some great local RE professionals. Property managers, brokers, realtors, contractors, flippers, wholesalers, even cops. I plan to hoard on cash, wait for the market to crash, overcome my fear of global warming, re-enter the Jacksonville market with the help and guidance from those awesome people. I'm sure my next deal there will be better. 

Originally posted by @JC Wu :

@Jeremy Z. Keen observation. I came to the same conclusion. I've made connections with some great local RE professionals. Property managers, brokers, realtors, contractors, flippers, wholesalers, even cops. I plan to hoard on cash, wait for the market to crash, overcome my fear of global warming, re-enter the Jacksonville market with the help and guidance from those awesome people. I'm sure my next deal there will be better. 

curious why Jacksonville of all places. ??? and if your hoarding cash why not invest in notes that bring the same if not more return than rentals.. while you wait for the impending crash..  

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