Advice to tweaking my DM copy - Add my website or not?

23 Replies

I'm tweaking the copy of my next direct mail campaign and I'm wondering if I should add my website on the postcard.

Here is my copy without the postcard:

*****************************************************

I noticed you own the property at {house address} in {city}. I

am a local investor and would like to provide you with an unconditional

premium offer on your property.

It is critical for us to stress that there is never any commitment when you call

us. Even, if you are just simply curious. We buy As Is, Where is, Any

Condition, and have the ability to close on your time-table without any

stress!!

Interested? Please give me a call at 240-412-2372 to find out more. We

are prepared to buy your property for cash and at no out of pocket cost to

you what so ever.

Even if you are not interested in selling at this time, call 240-412-2372, so I

can help you determine the value of your property.

Sincerely,

James Green III

**************************************************************

I just noticed that I didn't say "Hi {first name}".

All suggestions welcome, especially what has worked for you.

Thanks

James

@James Green adding a website adds credibility it's not necessary but you can. I've had sellers contact me via website off the postcard. I just put it on there to show I'm real and credible. As for the rest of the postcard, it's too wordy. If it were me, Get rid of any sentence or phrase that isn't a call to action. You want them to call you!!! You can explain all of that over the phone when they call. You need call to action. You only have a few sentences to grab someone's attention. That wouldn't grab my attention. Just my 2 cents. Hope it helps!

James:

I would not include your web address on the postcard. No offense, but your site needs a lot of work. You should consider getting a site from investor carrot (the best sites in the business) and also start doing remarketing on your site. Here are the changes I would suggest in all caps:

I noticed you own the property at {house address} in {city}. I

am a local investor and would like to provide you with an unconditional

FAIR offer on your property.

It is critical for us to stress that there is never any commitment when you call

us - EVEN IF YOU ARE JUST CURIOUS WHAT OUR OFFER WOULD BE. We buy AS-IS, IN Any Condition, and have the ability to close on WITHIN YOUR TIMEFRAM without any

HASSLES OR STRESS!!

Interested? Please give me a call TODAY at 240-412-2372 FOR A NO-OBLIGATION, FAIR OFFER. We

are prepared to buy your property for cash and at YOU WILL NOT HAVE ANY out of pocket cost - NO CLOSING COSTS, COMMISSIONS OR FEES. 

WE'VE HELPED COUNTLESS SELLERS BY BUYING THEIR HOME AND WE WANT TO BUY YOURS.

Sincerely,

James Green III

james - we have bought tons of houses in waldorf and southern md and would like to work with you. I filled out the form on your buyers site. Please send me deals as you get them. We can close extremely fast. We will buy 200+ homes in DC, VA and MD this year. Good luck!!!

@James Green I agree with pretty much all of what @Brad Chandler said. I will disagree with this sentence "even if you're just curious what the offer would be." You're not an appraiser, an agent, or anyone that's there to tell them what the house is worth. You are there to buy houses. You want to appeal to motivated people not tire kickers who will waste everyone's time. Make the postcard as if you are talking to a motivated seller, not someone who wants to see what you'd offer. I've never bought a house from someone that didn't have some kind of motivation

@micheal quarles I am in the process of ordering yellow letters from your site(I saw you mention the coffee stain one before so i decided to use that one). I am a newbie also and i have to wait to submitt my order on monday because i was unsure as to how to properly complete my order. Should I use your post card when i send out my second round of mailers or is there a particular order you do for a mailer campaign?

Folks, need to be careful about your advertising making representations, "I can buy" "Have the ability to close quickly" even "I Buy" if you don't have the ability to actually buy in your name. That's just ammo to get sued by a ticked off owner that gets hung by a wholesaler.

Michael has the ability to buy and close I'm sure. 

Review your advertising, make sure what is literally said is true, not some bit of semantics with wiggle room with your far fetched justifications as that is not how Truth in Advertising is viewed. It's not how regulators view it either.

I know I can't get newbies to have your ads run past an attorney, I can't get many to have their contracts reviewed I don't think. But, anything you put in writing, ask yourself "How is a judge going to view this?"

Advertising does not need representations or implied warranties, so don't go there unless you have the stuff to actually back it up yourself. :)    

 @James Green I am new, just disclosing up front, but I have heard, indifferently on the website issue. I had the same question and spoke with a few wholesalers doing direct mail marketing. Some said they don't want their website on postcards (letters the absolutely did). The thought was that they wanted calls, not people going to a site, then potentially not calling or signing up.

However, some wanted the site. If you have a very good converting site, then hopefully you won't lose people. I did not visit your site, but someone mentioned it could use some updating.

@Michael Quarles Again, while I am relatively new to wholesaling, I've read a lot of posts where Michael contributes, and his advice has been amazing. Coupled with the fact that he just presented his card that is not on the site is hands down top notch. Unless I missed it, I did not see a URL, but the text capturing is ingenious...even my grandparents text now.

Michael - What are your thoughts on having your site / URL on postcards?

@Bill Gulley I sent you this as a PM, but realized it's best to post here, maybe others had the same question:

If you don't mind me asking, if you do NOT have the ability to do the things you mentioned from Michael's post card, how would you word it?

This is one of the biggest things I'm struggling with as a relatively new wholesaler....I do have the ability to close quickly, with cash, etc.

However, I'm always thrown off on how to talk to motivated sellers, say through my bandit sign campaign, that call about a property that I DON"T want to buy. I flat out tell them up front that I won't be purchasing, but rather that I will be marketing to investors that I am deeply connected with (this is true), for a slight profit (via assignment or double close). I also NEVER do this if they are facing a foreclosure (say 2 weeks until the date, and mislead them that their house is going to be a guaranteed purchase). If they give me 30 days, and I can negotiate a good price, I should be able to sell it.

It just kind of throws me off, because up front it's "I'll buy your house", then it's "I won't but I'll market it", but I have to deliver enough value for them to see the potential in doing that.

Anyone with feedback, posts to read, etc. would be much appreciated!

Originally posted by @Bill Gulley :

Folks, need to be careful about your advertising making representations, "I can buy" "Have the ability to close quickly" even "I Buy" if you don't have the ability to actually buy in your name. That's just ammo to get sued by a ticked off owner that gets hung by a wholesaler.

Michael has the ability to buy and close I'm sure. 

Review your advertising, make sure what is literally said is true, not some bit of semantics with wiggle room with your far fetched justifications as that is not how Truth in Advertising is viewed. It's not how regulators view it either.

I know I can't get newbies to have your ads run past an attorney, I can't get many to have their contracts reviewed I don't think. But, anything you put in writing, ask yourself "How is a judge going to view this?"

Advertising does not need representations or implied warranties, so don't go there unless you have the stuff to actually back it up yourself. :)    

That would be particularly alarming if you are aware of "wholesalers" who have been sued based upon deceptive advertising practices.  Is that what you're basing this on?  Or the theory that this could happen?  I'd find that very informative if you have examples of it.  Now, if these folks enter into a contract, and we're talking about CONTRACT law, I can see some issues for concern (in regard to wholesaling).  I'm just not aware of any investor ever being sued for their postcard ad copy.  @Michael Quarles have you heard of this?

@Steve 

@Steve Christensen undefined

Seems the issue is not having the ability to perform as advertised or as contracted. Fix that, use a transactional lender. You borrow the full amount, it gets "paid back" at settlement. 

@Dev  

@Dev Horn undefined

Opinion based on experience, there are thousands of cases about false and deceptive advertising, is one of those cases a wholesaler, I don't know, but I'd bet many cases deal with real estate, what I didn't mention was "bait and switch" that may apply as well.

I didn't say making such claims was the guided missile that blows wholesalers out of the water, but that it is ammo, pretty good ammo, IMO. 

About 3 months ago a wholesaler posted about getting nailed in Florida by regulators, that came about from his advertising. 

I bet you saw Brian Gibbons' post of the Ohio REC. The State's attorney speaking to the ability to perform. This can fall under "Capacity To Contract" that is not just limited to age or mental state, it also goes to ones ability to perform the promises made, their intent to perform as stated in the contract. 

A common phrase in a sale contract "Buyer agrees to buy and Seller agrees to sell...." is that really what we have going on here when we assign contracts? There wasn't even the intent of the wholesaler who signed as a buyer to carry through with the terms of the contract. Where does that put us in the "Meeting of the Minds" area?

For those interested in studying about contract law as opposed to assuming here is a good source:  http://jec.unm.edu/education/online-training/contr...

Assigning a contract is not illegal. The issue is having the ability, the capacity to perform as agreed, meeting of the minds, knowledge of the parties, implied warranty of written contracts, the jurisdiction and what is commonly practiced. Wholesalers have a very steep hill to climb by implying they are buying, IMO. Ask your attorney :)

@James Green @Steve Christensen here is a script that @Bill Gulley  posted one time that does a great job of disclosing your intentions and what you do. If your intentions are to assign a contract and never actually close,it is best that the homeowner knows exactly what is going on upfront. Most likely they will not care but its best to let them know. Below is the script:

Early on after introductions and finding why they are selling, their motivation, what they are trying to solve, ask simple questions.

Jerry, tell me, do you care who buys your house? I assure you, the answer will be no! They don't care. If anyone did (never happened to me) remind them of fair housing laws.

So, while I am interested in buying properties for my investments, if we agree to a fair price, you'll sell it at that price, is that right? Jerry says yes! Okay, great!

(Time to pay a compliment)

Jerry, overall the house looks good, from the out side the (whatever) looks (really nice, good, fair) I can see the possibilities for this being a good investment!

(I don't care if the place is falling in, something has to be good about it or you shouldn't be there! Tell the owner something they already know as a good investment feature.

Any prudent seller will pay attention to your interest in them and in their property. Careful, show too much interest in the property and they see dollar signs! Show interest in them and they are more likely to work with you.)

Jerry, the way real estate transactions are done, is that we do a quick inspection, we (have already or will) pull(ed) up comparable sold properties and we can find a fair price that we agree on. Is that okay with you? Jerry says sure.

After we get a standard contract signed, that's when my work really begins Jerry. By law, there are some seller's disclosures any seller needs to provide to any buyer, but as an investor I'm not as concerned about such things like a homeowner would be. But, we need to follow the laws.....right? And Jerry says "Oh yes, it has to be legal"!

Jerry, after we agree to a fair price, that is when I really go to work. I need to do inspections, I may need to line up contractors, make material lists and other things, but I can do my part pretty quickly. At that point, you can see where I have already invested my time, efforts and money in our deal, you can understand that, right?

Jerry says something like "well, yes, but that's your business". You're right Jerry, it's not your fault that I'm in business......say that with a wink and nod, jokingly or with a sigh.

Jerry, a few moments ago you told me that you didn't care who bought your property so long as you get the price we agree to, that's very important to me. Here's why;

I already know this can be a good investment property, I'm interested in buying it, but until all the inspections are done I can't say that any property fits my investment needs, but I also don't want to walk away from any agreement I make. That's not the way I do business!

To give you the best price I can means my assessments must be on the money, I don't want to waste your time or mine. I will have time, effort and money invested in our contract, and the work I do, just as other investors do.

Investors actually work together, if a property is on the market and it doesn't fit what they need, they will tell other investors. It's a big advantage for everyone.

Jerry, that means that when we reach an agreed fair price, regardless of any problems discovered, the seller saves marketing time and their holding costs are less.

For you, it's like having a stack of back up contracts at the same price, the chances of closing can be much greater dealing with investors than picky home buyers. You get your price and you don't pay any commissions.

Investors that work together trust each other, another investor will spend less time considering an investment property if most of the work has already been done for them.

Jerry, time is money for all of us. My time, effort and money will be paid by the investors I work with, if I let them buy it, that is, if I don't buy it first as I plan on doing.

It's an assurance that neither one of us are wasting our time and money.

I'm sure you see the advantage of working with me, Jerry. Is that acceptable to you, to be assured of selling your property at the price you agree to?

Done! Move on. Your position is fully disclosed. There is no smoke here, no partner lies, no weasel clauses, just the property being accepted after usual and customary inspections.

You explained your business position. I have also told people I can't feed my dog by just looking and contracting on properties! No one works for free. (Well, except for me, LOL)

The seller agrees to what he said he would do, sell to anyone at his price!

That also means, those other investors need to be known to you! Know your buyers, what they want, what they will do, otherwise, don't take a seller's property off the market just to go beat the bushes!!!

Now, go and do good! :)

@John Hixon thanks for the script. I actually let the seller know I will be assigning the contract to my financial partner, when I go line by line over my contract. I explain what "and/or assigns" means. I then ask "you don't care who closes on the property as long as you get your money right?" Which has always produced a Yes.

Thanks again!

@James 

@James Green undefined

And all wholesalers;

"Partner" is not a good term to use, and claiming one doesn't get you off the hook in a contract. In law a business partner who allows another to enter into a contract can still be responsible, they may not use minor objections like "I don't like it". 

That's because you, being their "partner" are expected to know what is and is not acceptable with your business partner, having the authority to contract for or in your partnership. 

It can also come to surface that you don't really have a partner............where does that lead you?

Signing in the name of an entity with undisclosed "partners" still reverts to the issues mentioned above. Signing individually with undisclosed "partners" gives you nothing to hide behind, you're responsible to buy. 

Weasel clauses such as "with partner approval" can also backfire, there is no partner, so you're dealing in bad faith if not outright fraudulently. 

You can't use an excuse that is or should have been apparent, like the carpet needs to be replaced and would cost too much. Need something more like "your HVAC system is about to go out, it's in poor condition" from an inspection by a qualified inspector.

Now, the proper way to close a transaction begins with a copy of the sale contract. First question, is it a valid contract? If it was made in the name of an entity, where are the by-laws or operating agreement, the authority for the person executing the contract? If that contract is assigned, that changes nothing as to the validity of the original execution of the contract, so, where is the authority and who was the partner signing off on your deal?

If you sign individually and refer to a partner in writing, the closing agent may then need the partner's signature since there appears to be someone else floating around out there that has an interest in the contract and property. Who you gonna call to be your partner?

Your contract must be valid from its inception and through the assignment to the end buyer. 

I suggest that wholesalers drop the "partner" talk, that's just guru junk, ensure you have a clear "meeting of the minds" when contracting. My "script" as it was called was a conversational way of explaining what was being done, why it was done, being justified, without implications of bogus partners, use that approach.

And James, I think you meant to say your seller says no to that question. Be aware of who is to pay for the title search and title insurance, that can determine where you go for settlement. 

Good luck :)