Commercial Real Estate

3 Metrics Crucial for Finding Amazing Apartment Building Deals

Expertise: Business Management, Commercial Real Estate, Landlording & Rental Properties, Real Estate Deal Analysis & Advice, Mortgages & Creative Financing, Personal Development, Real Estate Investing Basics
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How do you know if an apartment building is a good deal? In this article, I give you the 3 main indicators and rules of thumbs to find out.

You’re interested in apartment building investing, and you see a bunch of multifamily properties for sale on Loopnet. Maybe you’re even (yikes) thinking of making an offer. But how do you know if the asking price is reasonable? And if it’s not, what price makes sense?

The 3 Main Ratios for Valuing Commercial Real Estate

There are 3 main ratios for estimating the value of an apartment building. Here they are:

  • Capitalization Rate (a.k.a. the “Cap Rate”)
  • Cash on Cash Return
  • Debt Service Coverage Ratio

Let’s talk about each in turn. I’ll cover what they are, how to use them, and what value to look for in a good deal.

10-unit-apartment

Key Indicator #1: The Cap Rate

In order to know the fair market value of a building, we need to know its “cap rate” and its “NOI.”

The NOI is the net operating income, and this is the income after all expenses but before debt service (i.e. the mortgage payment).

The cap rate is a multiplier that is applied to the NOI to determine the value of a building. It’s like saying that the building can be valued at “10 times its net operating income.”

The cap rate is the rate of return if you were to buy the building 100 percent in cash. You probably wouldn’t do that, but this is the standard way to measure the returns and value of a building.

Cap rate is such an abstract concept that an example is in order.

Imagine you have an ATM machine that makes $100,000 per year for you after all expenses (your cost to lease the space, to pay someone to maintain it for you, repairs, etc). So the NOI of this ATM machine is $100,000 per year.

You then talk to a group of people who are interested in acquiring your ATM machine. You ask them, “What would you be willing to pay for this ATM machine?” One buyer might say, “One million dollars,” and you ask him how he came up with this number. He says that if he buys your ATM machine for $1M and it produces $100,000 in income, then that is a 10% cash on cash return on his money. And this sounds like an excellent investment to this investor.

Another investor ups the offer to $1.1M. The ATM finally sells for $1.2M. This would produce an 8% return to the buyer if he paid in all cash.

In mathematical terms, the cap rate is a ratio consisting of the NOI divided by the price (or value) of the property.

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In the case of our ATM machine, the cap rate is 8% ($100,000 divided by $1,200,000).

If you’re in the market of buying ATM machines, you could quickly compare one with another by using the cap rate. If the prevailing cap rate for ATM machines is 8%, then you can quickly calculate it’s fair market value if you know its income.

Related: Don’t Think You Can Do Your First Apartment Deal? Then Read THIS.

Applying this to commercial real estate, let’s say our broker brings us a deal and tells us that “buildings in this area typically trade at an 8 cap.” This means that you can use a cap rate of 8% to calculate the fair market value of a property in this area, like this:

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Suppose the marketing package you get from your broker shows a net operating income of $50,000. Applying an 8% cap rate, our building should be worth $625,000:

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The cap rate is useful for determining the fair market value of a building because buildings in the same area tend to share a similar cap rate.

In general, the nicer the area, the higher the prices and the lower the cap rates, typically 7% and under. Conversely, properties in not-so-nice areas have lower prices and therefore have higher cap rates.

How do you determine the cap rate?

Glad you asked! The cap rate requires knowledge of the NOI and sales price of comparable properties in the area. The best people who know about both of these are commercial real estate brokers and appraisers.

Start by asking the listing agent what the prevailing cap rate is for buildings of this kind and in this area. Use that cap rate. If it gets more serious (i.e. you’re going to make an offer), then get a second opinion from several other brokers. Better yet, call an appraiser; it’s their business to value buildings every day, and they’ll be able to give you an unbiased opinion.

What cap rate should I look for?

The rule thumb is to purchase properties at a cap rate of 8% or higher in our current market environment. Note that this is only a rule of thumb, as cap rates can vary from area to area.

Also be aware that for the cap rate to give you an accurate value, you have to base it on ACTUAL financials. Many times you see a marketing package advertising the deal at a 9% cap rate (great!), but then you discover that the expenses are low.

Well, shoot, what value is the cap rate if the expenses aren’t accurate?

That’s why I advise that you use the “50% Rule” for expenses: Assume the actual expenses are at least 50% of the reported rental income. Use that figure and you’ll get closer to the truth.

Let’s talk about the second key indicator, the cash on cash return.

Key Indicator #2: Cash on Cash Return

Cash flow is king, and the cash on cash return measures how much cash you’re getting back each month based on how much cash you invested.

The cash on cash return is the cash flow after ALL expenses (including debt service) divided by the total cash invested.

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So if our annual cash flow after expenses is $20,000 and we put $200,000 into the deal, then our cash-on-cash return is 10%.

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Is that a good return?

Related: How I Bought a Multi-Million Dollar Apartment Complex at the Age of 26

It depends on your investment criteria, but you should look for properties with at least a 12% return after you’ve “stabilized” the property.

“Stabilized” means that it has an occupancy of at least 90%.

This means you could buy a deal with only a 5% cash on cash return in the first year, but your target is at least 12% after you’ve filled up all the units.

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Key Indicator #3: Debt Service Coverage Ratio

This is a ratio most often used by banks to determine the risk level of the building if they were to grant a loan to you. The debt service coverage ratio (DSCR) measures the ratio of net operating income to the amount of annual debt service you need to pay. Typically, banks look for a debt coverage ratio of at least 1.25. Here is the formula:

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Assume that the net operating income is $50,000 and that the annual debt service (principal and interest) is $40,000. Then the debt service coverage ratio is:

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Since we’re above the bank’s minimum debt coverage ratio of 1.25, then 1.3 looks OK.

You should look for deals where the DSCR is at least 1.5, which is more conservative and is more likely to keep you out of trouble.

Conclusion

Now you know the 3 main indicators for figuring out if an apartment deal is a good one or not. Stick to these 3 metrics, and it will help you narrow down the field of deals and give you a margin for error.

BUT having said that, these 3 metrics (and the rules of thumb) are a bit of an over-simplification of the process of evaluating apartment building deals. That’s because if you buy a value-add deal, for example, where the vacancy rate is low or expenses are high, your 3 indicators may be low, but it may still be a good deal overall. In other words, if we’re going to evaluate a “value-add” deals, we may have to break our rules of thumb for the 3 key indicators.

Any questions about these evaluations? Where are you in the process of finding an apartment deal?

Let me know your questions, comments, and experiences below!

Michael Blank is a leading authority on apartment building investing in the United States. He’s passionate about helping others become financially free in 3-5 years by investing in apartment building deals with a special focus on raising money. Through his investment company, he controls over $30MM in performing multifamily assets all over the United States and has raised over $8MM. In addition to his own investing activities, he’s helped students purchase over 2,000 units valued at over $87MM. He’s the author of the best-selling book Financial Freedom With Real Estate Investing and the host of the popular Apartment Building Investing podcast Apartment Building Investing podcast.

    Naveen Desai Real Estate Professional from San Francisco-East bay, CA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hi Michael, Thanks for making the terminologies easy to understand. The words are usually Intriguing and your examples make it clear and simple. Thanks. N.
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Naveen!
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Naveen!
    Steve Vaughan 10X Napper & Landlord from East Wenatchee, Washington
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks for writing this, Michael! The main commercial value determination metric of market cap’s use I think is very misunderstood. People will apply the crude NOI/Sales price ratio to ‘determne’ the cap on their prospective purchase and ask the forums if it’s a good deal. Without knowing the market cap – what cap rate similar assets in their area have sold for recently – nobody will know if it’s a good value or not. Then there’s accurately determining your cap based on true NOI and what that looks like. Different story LOL. Great info. Keep up the good work!
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Steve … Next week’s article will go in more depth about evaluating deals since it’s not always as easy as cap rate and NOI … thanks for your feedback!
    Paul Miller Investor from Afton, Virginia
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hi Michael – thanks for sharing this. Just starting the process of evaluating multi-family deals and this helps.
    Celso Cardano
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Michael, great article. Just for a point of clarify, on #2 Cash on Cash return, assuming the property has already been stabilized and if we did a cash out refinance, does the total investment ($200k) now change to the new refinanced amount of money left in the deal or do we still use the original amount invested? Pls clarify, thanks…
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Celso, yes, you would use the amount of cash/equity that is left in the deal after the refinance. Thanks!
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Celso, yes, you would use the amount of cash/equity that is left in the deal after the refinance. Thanks! Reply Report comment
    Kenneth Haynes from Portland, Oregon
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Awesome article Michael. Thanks for posting this. It gives good clarity to the terms and how they are used. I’m looking forward to your next article.
    Rajeshwar Raj Investor from Hawthorne , Ca
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great Article…. This article gave me a better understanding on what main factors to look at when looking at Multi Family Units.
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks!
    Peter Mckernan Residential Real Estate Agent from Newport Beach, California
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hey Michael, Great article that is simple and basic to follow for new commercial investors, and investors that haven’t been looking for deals for awhile. It is always good to bring it back to the basics.
    Karan
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for sharing this informative blog. These days, having knowledge of real estate is a must. Keep sharing such informative blogs related to real estate market.
    Donny Widjaja Investor from Pflugerville, Texas
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Thanks for all great articles. I learned a lot from them.
    Melissa Siqueiro from Laveen, Arizona
    Replied over 2 years ago
    This just scratches the surface of Michael’s analysis knowledge! I’ve done a few of his seminars and his syndicated deal analyzer- all great. Thanks for this post- good review!
    Michael Blank Rental Property Investor from Northern Virginia, VA
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Thanks Melissa, I appreciate the kind words …
    Kate Stephens Rental Property Investor from Ventura, California
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Great article and clear explanation. Thank you
    Tracey Williams Investor from Columbus , Ohio
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Hi Michael, Thank you for taking time to share your knowledge with us. You made it very clear and simple and that is exactly what am looking for. On my way to my first MF. God bless you. Tracey
    Aaron Mazzrillo Investor from Riverside, California
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Thanks for the debt service coverage ratio explanation. I’m dealing with this now on a large loan and I didn’t quite understand the formula.