Real Estate News & Commentary

America’s New Remote Workers Are Moving—Here’s Where

Expertise: Landlording & Rental Properties, Real Estate News & Commentary, Real Estate Investing Basics
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Remember the good old days of early COVID? I’m pretty sure I had a relative tell me in April 2020 that we were 10 days out from solving the coronavirus problem. That same relative is, indeed, still pretending to this day we never had that conversation.

Alas, I digress!

This is an article for people who want to rent their properties to remote workers, and this is an article about where those remote workers moved between April and October in the wake of the pandemic.

Why Real Estate Investors Should Care About Remote Workers

But first, here’s why I have been putting out a ton of content around remote workers and where they are likely to land:

  1. NPR is reporting 14–23 million people will be moving because they are no longer tethered to their jobs.
  2. I think this is a very important tenant pool that can help you transition out of Airbnb (because your city’s laws changed or because you are tired of doing Airbnb) without having to sell the furniture.
  3. I personally have seen a lot of success with this model in Denver and Colorado Springs, because that's where I work as a real estate agent and landlord with people looking to rent by the room, sublet, medium-term rent, house hack, etc.
  4. And finally, I believe that certain places are likely to be much more attractive to remote workers because they are cool places to live/vacation/wait out COVID. (That’s right! I’m talking about you, Colorado.)

Related: Remote Workers Are Relocating—Here’s How to Attract Them as Tenants

OK, Erin, we get it. You’re passionate about Colorado. But where are the facts? How can you back this up?

Where Are People Moving Amid COVID-19?

Good news: Bloomberg backed this up for me, reporting the following cities are seeing the highest influx of people from April 2020 to October 2020:

  1. Austin
  2. Phoenix
  3. Nashville
  4. Tampa
  5. Jacksonville
  6. Charlotte
  7. Dallas
  8. Denver(!)
  9. Charleston
  10. Seattle

Related: Top 5 Features Remote Workers Look for in Rentals

And WalletHub reports that the best states for working from home are:

  1. Delaware
  2. Washington
  3. New Hampshire
  4. Colorado(!)
  5. Georgia

Did you notice which location showed up on both of those lists? Colorado!

The Bottom Line

Some major factors for remote workers leaving their location and moving to yours are cost of living and also lower tax rates. I think there is a little more to this, though. We know the cost of living in both Seattle and Denver is fairly high, so surely quality of life factors in there, as well. Places people are leaving are places that are just becoming way too expensive for your average person to live (ahem—New York and San Fran).

Related: The Ultimate Guide to Getting a Rental Property Ready During COVID-19

Since you may be wondering if this is temporary, rest assured. Per a survey of executives by EisnerAmper:

  1. 60% of respondents will let staff continue to work from home, and
  2. 55% are more likely to hire out-of-state employees.

What that means to me is that this trend is not only here to stay but also growing. In the next one to five years, a lot of people will want to experience different parts of the U.S. for months at a time before deciding where to live now that they can live anywhere. And you, as a real estate investor, can make a lot of money by being the property that caters to this crowd by getting in front of them with your 30+ day, furnished rental.

Questions? Comments?

Join the discussion below.

Erin Spradlin co-owns Erin and James Real Estate. She loves working with first-time homebuyers or sellers because it is fun to help people realize their dreams and loves working with investors because she's a fellow spreadsheet nerd. In addition to working with clients on buying and selling real estate, Erin Spradlin also runs Denver Women Invest, a monthly female investing group (email her if you want in!) and educational classes on Airbnb investing and buying or selling your first home. In keeping with many successful real estate investors, Erin and James Real Estate believes strongly in giving back to the community. For that reason, they donate a portion of their commission to a charity of their client's choosing on every single transaction.
    Tyler Grein from Buda, TX
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Hi Erin! Thanks for the great info in this article! With Denver being in the top 10 cities with the highest influx of people this year, are you seeing these people gravitate towards the downtown area or more towards the outskirts of town?
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I personally believe that a lot of people will want to be in cities (and other people) when this ends, but not everyone feels that way... so, I can't confidently say, but I do think you could get a great deal on a condo right now and then turn around and rent it out for quite a bit in the future.
    Eric Daub from Greeley, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Something that I've noticed is how many people are commuting up to an hour and a half to work. I live and am employed in Greeley, CO and can't help but to notice how many people travel over an hour to get to Greeley for work. What takes me further aghast is how many of their friends are traveling all the way to Denver. I think the path of progress is pointing outward to areas like Eaton, Kersey, Nunn, Fort Morgan, and as far north as Cheyenne. So from an ebb/flow stance, I'm looking to start investing in Cheyenne. If I were working remotely, I'd want to be in the mountains.
    Jordan Moorhead Real Estate Agent from Austin, TX
    Replied about 1 month ago
    We're certainly feeling this in Austin this year! Migration was already happening but it got supercharged.
    Paneez Kosarian
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Jordan, which parts of Austin are growing the fastest? Based on my research so far, area 9 & 11 are the best bets for 2021. Would love to hear your thoughts about other fast growing areas that would be good for investment. I am a CA based investor :) Will be flying to Austin tomorrow to look at properties.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Austin is #1... which is confusing to me, because I've been to Denver. :)
    Desiree L. New to Real Estate from Bradley Beach, NJ
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I lived in Denver for 3 years. I can see why Austin is #1.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Whattttt?? Get out of here with that.
    Colin Simon Investor from Boulder, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Denver is a craphole that I am so happy to have moved out of
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    LOL. And Denver is happy you left.
    Luka Milicevic Rental Property Investor from Nashville, TN
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I didn't see a list of places they are leaving. My guess is San Fran, Palo Alto, and just about every other place in California tops the list. If employees can work for tech companies in TX, or TN it's an instant pay raise on two fronts: Taxes and cost of living! Nashville is attracting a ton of tech talent with the amount of jobs moving here. Amazon was a huge one that showed Nashville has the ability to attract really good tech talent. Austin of course has been on a tear with tech companies leaving California. I was quite surprised to see Seattle on the list. The cost of living there is insane and boy does it ever stop raining?????
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    San Fran and NYC are being hit the hardest by people leaving. You'll see that in multiple recent stories. I think Seattle and Denver are very similar and attract very similar types of people- which is why you see Denver's prices following Seattle's pricing trend. I'll be interested to see how Colorado Springs follows as well, since it is a slightly different type of person. What does Nashville offer?
    Lynnette E. Rental Property Investor from Tennessee
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Nashville has moderate weather, just very light snow storms in the Winter and mild Summers, usually in the 70's. There are no state income taxes. The community has lots of activities indoor and outdoor and food scene. Its a very accepting community as far as diversity goes. However, they are not accepting of destructive activities. The state passed a law that if one is rioting they spend a mandatory 45 days in jail and loose their voting rights. They actively prosecute anyone who destroys stuff in the riots. So that ceased in TN pretty quick. The state as a whole is very community-like. When there is a disaster like a tornado, generally within a week they announce they do not need any more donations except maybe time to help with the clean up of debris. The state of TN has one of the best state park systems for outdoor activities. Fishing, hiking, kayaking, etc are easily available. A lot of the middle and eastern parts state is forested. *West is more desert.
    Casey Powers Property Manager from Las Vegas, NV
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Click the link to the Bloomberg article. Shows top 10 "losing" cities also. City // Cost of living rank Hartford, CT 39 New York City, NY 1 San Francisco Bay Area, CA 3 Chicago, IL 22 Cleveland, OH 118 Norfolk, VA 111 Boston, MA 8 Detroit, MI 66 Cincinnati, OH 147 Pittsburgh, PA 64
    Andrew Syrios Residential Real Estate Investor from Kansas City, MO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I'm surprised to Seattle on that list. It would seem that people are tending to move from the major urban centers, particularly the coastal cities (New York, San Fran, LA, etc.) to the more affordable "secondary" cities, i.e. Charlotte, Austin, Phoenix Nashville, etc. (Although Dallas probably shouldn't be considered secondary.) I wouldn't be surprised to see this trend start to move into so-called "tertiary" markets relatively soon as those "secondary" markets start to get more expensive.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Yes. This is why I'm all in on Colorado Springs. I think as a secondary city with good access to a major city (Denver), it will do well.
    Heather Cannady
    Replied 20 days ago
    WA has no state income tax and hosts many Amazon operations (major hiring blitz last year) and other companies that were still hiring through the pandemic.
    Robi Schreckhise Real Estate Broker from Charlotte, NC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    This is an amazing article! I love seeing that Charlotte, NC is on the list. Reports have been showing our influx of residents moving here per day has increased 30-40%!
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Wow! What's in Charlotte? What's your opinion on why people are flocking there?
    Robi Schreckhise Real Estate Broker from Charlotte, NC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    We are the second-largest financial hub in America right after Wallstreet. We have thriving tech, sports, medical and education industries. It is a meddling pot of all races and peoples and has a very strong job market. The medical and banking industry especially pulls a lot of young professionals to live and work here. We just took over the spot for the 15th largest city in America. Taxes are great here for small business owners and the housing market is affordable compared to some other large metros. And the cherry on top is the nature and greenery. In most places, it is as if they built the city inside of a forest. The trees in some of our neighborhoods are over 200 years old. It's a city with a suburban feel.
    Debra Cheney from Los Angeles, California
    Replied about 1 month ago
    LOL! "meddling pot" of all races
    Robi Schreckhise Real Estate Broker from Charlotte, NC
    Replied 28 days ago
    LOL I totally missed that! Good eye!
    Allen Amani New to Real Estate from Honolulu
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I've been considering Charlotte as a place to invest. You just convinced me to visit lol. Thank you.
    Robi Schreckhise Real Estate Broker from Charlotte, NC
    Replied 28 days ago
    Do it and let me know what you think!
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Wow. You are making me want to visit. I also love a diversity of economy (so one business can't leave and tank the city) for an investment, and it sounds absolutely beautiful.
    Robi Schreckhise Real Estate Broker from Charlotte, NC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    You certainly should! You won't regret it but I would wait until things go back to semi-normal so all the restaurants, breweries, and local attractions will be in full swing!
    Gerald Hand from Flower Mound, Texas
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Given the fallout of the previous few months of anarchy in some cities, most notably Seattle, I find it dubious to have any list that would include it as a haven for people escaping COVID. The balance of Washington is somewhat believable though, but overall interesting read.
    Guy Parisi
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I'd have to know more about how they compiled the data, but my guess is that there is a different from "City" and "City metro area". Seattle is a beautiful area to live (Washington in general) and it has a lot of major employment draws and very good weather. I think the reality is that even if people don't like to live in Seattle proper, they really like living in the surrounding area (which may very well be considered "Seattle" by this study). Regarding the "overun with junkies..." comment: eh... I think its about the same as other major cities I've been to. I've lived in the suburbs around Seattle my entire life and the city never felt any less safe. I've seen far more aggressive pan-handling in other cities (Atlanta, I'm looking at you).
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Agree with Gay totally. Denver is starting to have an issue with people experiencing homelessness as well, and it's not great, but I am hard pressed to cite an American city that has handled that extremely complicated situation well.
    Brent M. Investor from Hayward, California
    Replied about 1 month ago
    My buddy, a highly paid tech professional, just sold his Seattle home and fled from there with his family for Cincinnati. He says that the block his home was on -which saw maybe two homes turnover in the last decade has had five people sell and leave since summer. He describes a formally nice place now overrun with junkies, criminals and lawlessness.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Oh boy. That sounds like hyperbole.
    Michael Baum from Olympia, Washington
    Replied about 1 month ago
    It absolutely isn't hyperbole. It is a stark reality. Seattle has decriminalized many crimes. Property crime is up 300% in the city. The police can't respond to simple break in's any more. The defund police movement in Seattle is being driven by the city council who has voted to cut the police budget and officers. Seattle has lost 200 officers since the summer. It is only getting worse. I am positive that the "Seattle" area is surrounding cities and not Seattle proper. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpAi70WWBlw
    Deanna Lopez-Medina
    Replied 28 days ago
    Sounds like NYC :-(
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Yes, but nevertheless, Seattle is on the list. I personally don't feel like people are going to avoid cities long term. I think people miss people/restaurants/culture and will return to hotbeds for that.
    Yvonne H. from Mooresville, North Carolina
    Replied about 1 month ago
    This comment cracked me up! Nashville IS a hotbed of culture, far more than San Francisco. Ever heard of a little thing called Country Music :-) ? Same with Austin. You can't have a great culture & arts vibe when new, young artists can't afford to live there. That is exactly why Charlotte, Nashville, and Austin are top contenders for young people. They love the "anything can happen here, the world is mine". Opportunity, potential=new culture. Ask any young person who is interested in the arts and applying for college--where do they want to go? I guarantee you over half of the responses will be a city in the south. Nashville, Austin, or Savannah. Those are our new culture hubs.
    Ryan Kelly Realtor from Austin, TX
    Replied about 1 month ago
    If there was a 10-lane highway from San Francisco to Austin, it would have a traffic jam! That's what 2020 has felt like this year. Austin has already been growing at a very strong clip for the past 20 years, but as @Jordan Moorhead stated, this year has been supercharged. The median home price in Austin in November was up 19% over November 2019.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    That's absolutely crazy, but great news for investors in Austin. We are having a lot of that in Denver and Colorado Springs, and the subsequent complaining about outsiders... but I feel like it's very flattering to live somewhere that everyone else wants to be.
    Ron Trinh Accountant from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Erin helped me find a place in Colorado Springs this year and I freakin love it. For all the reasons mentioned above, working from home here has been a great experience thus far and the wife and I are committed to furthering our real estate journey out here.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Ron! Thank you for the shout out. I am glad to hear you and Erica are liking Colorado Springs, and from your photos I can see you are getting some time in at Fox Run and Bear Creek.
    Ron Trinh Accountant from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied 21 days ago
    Can't get enough!
    Paul Karagas
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I own rental houses in Pueblo, CO, about 50 miles south of Colorado Springs, and zillow shows only 33 places available for rent as of today. I get fb inquiries and emails/phone calls even though I haven't listed a property for over a year. These people have been calling from Denver, CO Springs and out of state.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Yes, I think you can look down the entire front range and see what happened and what's coming. I don't invest in Pueblo, but I've been tempted. (Also I think Security and Widefield are very interesting and also are probably getting a lot of rent right now.)
    Michael Haas Realtor from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Wow - lots of hate for Seattle here! We're still seeing massive inflows of new transplants to the city and (especially) surrounding areas. Our wage to house price ratio is still more favorable than San Francisco, New York, and even Denver. If you don't just look at prices, but look at median wages as well to see how much the average worker can afford in the city, you'll see that Denver is more overvalued than Seattle is by that metric. I'm not sure how the study defines cities, by I'd assume they're looking more at metro-areas than distinct city boundaries (as Seattle is actually a very small city geographically). It is true that the downtown core of Seattle in general, and condos in particular, have not fared well under COVID restriction. Don't believe everything you see on TV. Yes, there are occasional protests and even riots in Seattle, but "anarchy" isn't even close to an accurate description. The mountains are still calling up here.
    Michael Baum from Olympia, Washington
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Sorry Michael. I know that the entire area isn't overun, but I don't go into Seattle for anything. Not shopping, or sports, or anything. The last time I was there I was accosted by some homeless outside city hall. I am disabled using a cane so they thought I would be easy pickin's. It has nothing to do with COVID. It is all the politics of the city. This all started long before COVID.
    Chad McLeod
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Seattle is great. Notice how the people who talk about how bad Seattle is never actually LIVE in Seattle? I’m guessing the vast majority haven’t even visited here. Yet they want to speak like they know what’s going on because they watched Fox News. Hilarious. I actually live here, so I know what’s going on. Anarchy? LOL uh, ok. No need for facts when you can just spout bullsh*t and hope people take it as gospel, right? I guess I should start blindly complaining about Birmingham, AL, Dallas, TX, etc. Sorry for the rant, and I appreciate your article because you actually cited facts, but this site is a far cry from what it used to be. More real estate, less political crybabies, please.
    Michael Baum from Olympia, Washington
    Replied about 1 month ago
    You are right, I don't live in Seattle. I live about 60 mi away in Olympia. I used to go there on a regular basis. No longer. No BS, no gospel, no Fox News. Seattle has serious problems and they aren't likely to be fixed anytime soon. No, the whole city isn't overun, but you can't ignore that nearly every park in Seattle is a homeless camp. I would go on but what's the point.
    Rob Burns Flipper from Jacksonville, FL
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Chad, I guess the rest of us just don't think it's normal when lunatics occupy 6 square blocks of a city, overthrow a police station and firebomb a courthouse for 100 days straight. And yes I have family in the area.
    Chad McLeod
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Good for you, Rob. Still trying to figure what that has to do with real estate? It had zero effect on me and 99.99999% of people who live in Seattle. But I’m proud of you for watching the news. I guess based on your logic I should come into every article that mentions Jacksonville and talk about all the negative things mentioned about that city. You want to talk about “6 blocks” in Seattle but neglect all the crime in JAX? Gee, I wonder why?
    Walter F. Specialist from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Haha. Good response chad. This has just turned to Twitter at this point.
    Chad McLeod
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Yeah, it’s become ridiculous. I guess in fairness I shouldn’t expect dazzling wisdom in the comments section, but I also think we as members should get to expect more from the site. The worst for me is when people write articles that are obviously political in nature. I’m sure as hell not paying membership fees to read other people’s political rants on an RE investing site.
    Chad McLeod
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Ok, at least you’ve actually been to Seattle. That’s more than most of the whiners on here can say. And I will grant you that there are a lot of homeless in the park on 3rd and James, but it’s most certainly not “nearly every park.” I’ve lived here since 1998. Lived in 6 different neighborhoods. Graduated from college here. Worked in Downtown Seattle, SoDo, Bellevue, etc. I currently work just south of the stadiums and take the bus in every day. One of my bus stops is *GASP* at The Mission! With real life homeless people walking around outside!!! I have had no issues in 6 years. Then again, an issue to me may be different than an issue to you or someone else. I’ve had a few people ask for money, food, etc. Big deal. Happens in every city and, yes, even in red cities that people on here want to act like are some kind of utopia. My point is the ONLY reason people want to bitch about Seattle is because they are conservative. Seriously?? Grow up. I’m not even sure why people are self-absorbed enough to think other people on here care about their politics in the first place, but whatever.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    No hate from me! If I was ever going to leave Colorado, Seattle would be top of my list.
    Isaiah Thompson from Norfolk, Virginia
    Replied about 1 month ago
    There's a lot of people moving to Southern Virginia as well, I've seen a lot more New York and D.C. license plates driving around Virginia Beach the last few months. I'd also be interested in seeing a list of places where people already have a secondary/vacation home, and are now making that their permanent residence.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Agreed. It'll be interesting to see how people adjust behavior post-covid. We definitely have, and have been pleasantly surprised to find we like the slower pace in Colorado Springs and the small town feel of it. I never thought we'd leave Denver, but now that we're here, we love it. THAT SAID, I feel strongly people will return to the cities. I, for one, miss dining in the company of strangers.
    Amri Jane
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I'm interested to learn more about laws surrounding these month rentals. How would things like evictions work if it came to it?
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I think that's something that is still being worked out. I imagine the lease situation is similar to that of a long-term lease. That said, these are usually white collar renters that have not been as impacted by the virus, and therefore, it has not been an issue for us yet.
    Tim Parker Investor from Bremerton, Washington
    Replied about 1 month ago
    We live across Puget Sound from Seattle and have renters who moved from Seattle because rentals are less expensive and our quality of life is higher (we have no police independent zones).
    Kyle McKiernan Real Estate Investor from Chico, CA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Isn't it amazing that all these people are moving to red areas/states. 8/10 on that list are conservative areas of the country. Now you can argue that the city itself may be more towards the middle or to the left (like Austin and even Dallas) but they're in red states. Liberals get over crime, trash, drugs, homeless, high gas tax, high property tax, state tax, and then move to these areas around the country that are ran so well and end up being red but then vote ( EXACTLY the same).....Democrat and destroy those cities/states. It's a joke.
    Walter F. Specialist from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    What’s your point? Red states take more federal dollars than they contribute and blue states contribute more to the federal pile than they take. Take your politics somewhere else.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @kyle mckiernan - the good news for the country is that they probably won't stay red for long. :)
    Sherief Elbassuoni Realtor from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Seattle is still far better than many other Cities. Sure it has some problems like homelessness. That said, (the investment opportunities, appreciation, friendly land-use policies) the greater Seattle area offers, far outweigh any negative issues. I love the Greater Seattle area, invest in Seattle, and plan to keep doing that for the long term!
    Rob Burns Flipper from Jacksonville, FL
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Good luck with that.
    Walter F. Specialist from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    You seem to be fun at parties. Merry Christmas.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @sherief elbassuoni, Absolutely! I totally agree. Seattle is gorgeous, has an amazing food scene and very, very cool people.
    Gene Cook Residential Real Estate Broker from Penn Valley, CA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Politics aside... here to report on some Northern California trends. Demand in the smaller recreational areas has really gone up. All of the Tahoe basin is seeing very high demand as is the whole Sacramento and foothill regions. I live in a gated community in the foothills between Sacramento and Tahoe. In the summer of 2019 we had the usual mix of lakefront homes (our community includes a small 300 + acres recreational lake) listed and about half sold that season. This last summer every single lakefront home listed sold and there are currently none for sale. That is most probably unprecedented in this community which was built in the late 60s. Most of the demand is coming from the bay area which has long driven the Tahoe region market with demand for vacation housing . Now the trend appears to be a higher percentage relocating full time from the bay area and working remotely. Don't think this trend across the country is going to change anytime soon.
    Rob Burns Flipper from Jacksonville, FL
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Our rule of thumb is when the West coast or north east crowd moves in, it's time to move out. It's only a matter of time before they bring their policies with them and destroy that area too.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @rob burns - Do we mean their policies of making cities very beautiful/attractive and cool, which then results in housing prices to appreciate, diversity of industry to come in and happy citizenry? Are those the coastal policies that are leaving you trembling?
    Walter F. Specialist from Seattle, WA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Well said Erin.
    Carissa Holmes New to Real Estate from AUSTIN, TX
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Thanks for the great info, Erin! I'm hoping to pick your brain (as well as anyone else's worth picking :)) on Jacksonville. I was excited to see it ranked #5 - my husband grew up there and his family is all still there so it's one of the markets I'm considering for a soon-to-be made investment. Jacksonville is massive (land-mass wise), are there particular areas that are driving this and/or areas that you think are best for single family or duplex buy and holds? On a related note, how much do you expect (relative) things to change when Biden takes office? I'm very new to all of this but it's seems like that could be impactful although I don't fully understand the potentials. Thanks again!
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @carissa holmes Thanks! So, first things first, I don't think President Elect Biden is going to change much. There is a conversation about him removing the 1031 structure for people with an income of $400K or more per year and also a $15K credit to first time homebuyers, but I think President Elect will have a lot to manage when he comes into office as he tries to right the ship from the past four years. For that reason, I don't think he will change too much real estate wise. I literally know nothing about Jackson, but I will tell you that Colorado Springs is also a fairly large land mass. For that reason, I tell my clients to stick close to the downtown and the west side, where the mountains are. For you, it's probably stay close to water or whatever the attractive geo is. You can pay off everything in real estate except for location, so buying near something attractive is smart. All that said, do you think Jackson may have any climate change issues in the immediate future? I don't invest on the coasts, and would actually be more likely to invest in the midwest because of what is happening to the coasts... I know that topic is a bummer, but I think people will leave the coasts and head inland.
    Renier Walters New to Real Estate from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Great article. I am one of those tech people that moved from San Diego to Colorado Springs over 5 years ago due to the taxes and high cost of living and have remained remote ever since. As much as I wanted to live in the mountains I needed to be close enough to an airport for occasional travel to HQ. Denver (Tech Center and surrounds) was a little pricey so we looked in the Springs and have been here ever since.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @renier walters That's so great to hear! I hope you like Colorado Springs. I grew up down here, fled immediately, and have returned because I think the investment opportunity is better here than in Denver proper. I was reticent to come back because I'm not religious, military or conservative, but I've loved living here. Colorado Springs is so beautiful, the hiking is fantastic and it has a charming, small town feel.
    Monty Henson
    Replied about 1 month ago
    This is not really a new model in Austin where I have fellow REI that have run temp housing rentals to working professionals for years. One of my colleagues that has been doing it the longest has a wait list. He is also been focused on micro-living model for the downtown area. However that was before this year's pandemic, when lots of urban living folks looked to the burbs because nobody is working in offices downtown or uptown. Micro living in segregated units in the burbs may be best model for the future because of this pandemic and future pandemics. For example, in August 2019 available office sub-let space in Austin was about 700k sqft. In Sept 2020 available office sub-let space was approaching 3M sqft. I know two people that work from home now that each person's company had an entire floor of Class A office space overlooking Lake Austin. They shut it down and stopped paying their $80K/month rent in February, 2020. Moreover, I live NW Austin, down the street from Arboretum Area of Austin and not far from the Domain. I lost count of all of the restaurants (local and chain) and small shops that are gone for good. In Texas a 30 rental avoids having to collect sales tax and hotel tax. One note of caution my REI colleague has found his best temp housing tenants are working professionals that come in and out of town for projects working with UT, Samsung, NXP, etc, many were foreign nationals that could not get a lease or did not want a lease because they were only here 6-8 weeks. Pandemic has changed that. To respond to Amari Jane's question above: "I'm interested to learn more about laws surrounding these month rentals. How would things like evictions work if it came to it? " Depends on your location and jurisdiction. Pandemic has changed that too. Be selective on who your allow to be a temp housing guest. My experience is middle aged males that are unemployed or underemployed are the worst offenders and headache. In Texas forcible entry and detainer suit (eviction) is filed in JP court and it is pretty quick process. For a temp housing or STR lease I have a contract that I use that states the person is a "house guest" and has no rights to establish the temp rental as their residence even if they receive mail there. So my "guest house" rental agreement does not require 30 day written notice to move out, or a time to cure any default or other typical terms and conditions of a standard landlord/tenant rental agreements. Warning, service animal and emotional support animal bogus scams against landlords are on the rise. Best practice is to never say "NO" up front or you will be in violation of Federal and State Fair Housing Acts to deny a service animal (is certified) or emotional support animal (required no certification) and be on the wrong end of a very expensive lawsuit brought by HUD or your State's anti-discrimination authority. Rather after a reasonable accommodation request is received ask for proof of the need (direct need or nexus) and ask the letter for need comes from one of your State's licensed professionals not some web-based out of State outfit. Any property damage is still responsibility of person seeking the accommodation for the animal and landlord may seek exclusion if animal becomes a nuisance to the property or other guests or other animals.
    Patricia Hoffman Investor
    Replied about 1 month ago
    Have you tried this company Pet Screening? They provide all the screening for you and find out if the animal is really a support animal at no cost to the landlord. If it is a support animal, the service is free to the tenant. https://www.petscreening.com/
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    @monty henson - Agreed that this model has always existed, but it has always existed the way VRBO always existed before Airbnb showed up. It was a missed opportunity and not top of mind for many investors. People need to hone in on this demographic, as remote workers in the medium term rental space are going to be a major player in the future.
    Troy Gandee Real Estate Broker from Charleston, SC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I'm a broker and investor in Charleston. We're seeing a ton of young professionals relocating to Charleston from larger MSAs at the moment. We're also seeing a lot of folks at the executive level preemptively moving to Charleston prior to retirement. It's been really interesting to see.
    Joe Bertolino Developer from El Dorado Hills, CA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I have always said that in the unlikely event that I ever moved out of CA then Charleston would be on my short list. I spent a lot of time there in when I was in college and its a great small city.
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I think it makes total sense though. If you are no longer geographically limited by work, why wouldn't you flock to a place with great culture/weather/etc.?
    Tim Mcbee Contractor from Charleston, SC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    We have a major spike in custom build requests in Charleston SC and Brevard County Florida. Literally our clients stated that they moved due to Covid restrictions.
    Joe Bertolino Developer from El Dorado Hills, CA
    Replied about 1 month ago
    The NV side of South Lake Tahoe is getting a large influx of Bay Area transplants.
    Katarina Schuette Real Estate Agent from Charleston, SC
    Replied about 1 month ago
    I am definitely seeing this in Charleston, SC. Most of my buyers lately have been families from New York, New Jersey, and California looking to move here for warmer weather and to get out of the city. New construction can barely keep up and values have skyrocketed.
    Benjamin Lenz from Walnut Creek, CA
    Replied 30 days ago
    Of course it’s true that Covid has allowed remote workers to leave more expensive cities like SF and NYC, but they’re leaving because they can’t take advantage of the amenities that these cities are renowned for. What do you think is going to happen when they’re are able to open up again? I’ve been to many beautiful places in the U.S. but there’s a reason that Northern California has the most expensive real estate in the country. Iconic cities aren’t going anywhere in the long run...
    Erin Spradlin Real Estate Agent from Colorado Springs, CO
    Replied 30 days ago
    AGREE.
    Steve Frye Real Estate Agent from Nashville, TN
    Replied 29 days ago
    I can speak to Nashville as a long-time resident and former Finance Executive who is now working as an investor friendly Realtor and Investor in my own right. Cash-flowing directly in Nashville for long-term rentals is at best a break-even proposition but it's a good play for long-term appreciation since this city is going to continue to grow and expand for a long time. Great city to live in. We do have a Democratic Mayor but Republican Governor so it's an interesting balance of those two drivers. Lots of transplants over the past 10 years has led to a city with a lot of interesting things to do and a terrific and growing food scene. Lots of outdoor activities and great parks. I get a lot of request for house-hacking properties from clients and there is a HIGH demand for rental space in the city. For more cash-flowing properties, I usually work with clients on areas within an hour of the city core. Areas like Clarksville, Columbia, Springfield, Dickson, Tullahoma, etc are great markets.
    Barry Cohen Lender from Washington DC
    Replied 26 days ago
    I just saw on the news today, home prices are rising by 12-15% in Arizona. Makes sense now.