California - New to this and looking for pointers!

4 Replies

Hey everybody! I'm so excited to have joined the BP community.  It's truly amazing to see how many people are so involved.  So, as my profile says, I'm 19 years old, almost 20 (Woohoo!), and am wise beyond my years and looking for the best ways to get started in flipping homes.  Whether it is hitting the books and learning the legal aspects and terminology, finding a successful investor to mentor me, getting a job in the industry, or just simply learning how to fix up a property, I would love for all of you to shed some light on what it's like to start young and what the best moves to make would be.  

1. If it be reading books and taking courses, are there any in particular you would suggest?  Should I shoot towards a specialty certification in a certain field?  Are there any random subjects that are crucial that I haven't thought of yet?  Is school even necessary?

2. To begin my search for a mentor, are there certain places to look whether it's online or around town?  Should I just begin contacting the owners of realty firms?

3. Regarding an occupation in the industry, which would be the best learning experience?  Is there anywhere in specific that investors offer jobs or am I just overthinking this and have to get out there?

4. Are there any top priorities that I need to learn about fixing up property?  Maybe the importance of plumbing?  Electrical wiring?  Things to know about piping?

I appreciate any feedback.  Thanks!

@Adam Stone

BP is a treasure chest full of useful resources. You will find resources here from blogs to pod casts and forums. You can also send messages to members which is my favorite part of the website.

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Hey Adam,

I'm in the same  boat  as  you  are, just starting off and all, and would like to keep in touch. I have found others that are starting off and have found that a very practical way of getting a good central I fluency is being a real estate agent. My friend is one aND he gets a lot of face time with almost  everyone  you  will need to rely on as a investor. So if you  don't plan  on getting a real estate license and working for a group, then find an agent that is local. I have found d personally that real estate  agents are very approachable. Let me know if you  need help with anything.

This post has been removed.

Originally posted by @Timothy Rinehart :

Hey Adam,

I'm in the same  boat  as  you  are, just starting off and all, and would like to keep in touch. I have found others that are starting off and have found that a very practical way of getting a good central I fluency is being a real estate agent. My friend is one aND he gets a lot of face time with almost  everyone  you  will need to rely on as a investor. So if you  don't plan  on getting a real estate license and working for a group, then find an agent that is local. I have found d personally that real estate  agents are very approachable. Let me know if you  need help with anything.

 Good to hear from you!  Thanks for the advice, I was looking into working for a firm.  Keep in touch!

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