Do you allow pets?

18 Replies

I am debating allowing pets into the apartment complex I own. I am curious of what other people do and if anyone feels passionate one way or another.

Hi, I had an initial policy of no pets, when I had two cats and a dog. That changed. I put a no pets clause in the lease with saying without specific written consent and an additional deposit. That's where it is now. I limited dogs to 20 pounds, that keeps out dobermans. Some small breeds get fat and go over, but I never really weighed on. Cats must be declawed. I'm not so much for that, but a cat closed off in a room will dig under a door to try to get out and shred the carpet. Someone wanted an aligator, no! A snake, No! And a parrot, that was a very cool bird, yes! Nothing exotic, or that causes ANY disturbance. I would also require that the animal must be carried out of the building and not allowed to walk out! A dog will just let it rip when he is out of his space! Good luck, Bill

Clearly if you can avoid it, that is the way to go. If you by chance are really busy and are keeping your units full, no reason to rent to someone that has animals when you could easily just rent it to someone else that doesn't have animals the next day.

But that may not be case. If you have a handful of units that you just cant rent, you may have to bite the bullet and accept pets just to get it rented. Of course with additional deposits/pet fees and a solid looking application.

How many units are in your complex? When it comes to animals, mainly referring to dogs, the more tenants there are that can potentially be affected by the animal, the worse. Such as maybe continuous barking, intimidation, perhaps they are not cleaning up after the dog, etc. And worse case scenario, another tenant attacked by the dog. If you lose one tenant just because of another tenants dog, due to all the possibilities I mentioned above, than it wasn't worth it allowing the dog.

So clearly there are a lot of factors to consider. It really all boils down to your past experiences and what you learned from them. A landlord could have plenty of pet friendly units and have no issues simply because hes been in the business for years and knows what to look for and what to avoid.

Brandon,

I do allow pets up to 20 pounds which eliminates your larger more destructive dogs. Of course that is not saying that little cat/dog won't do A LOT of damage because they can/will. I do charge a separate deposit for pets along with an additional amount per pet/per month. I make a habit to routinely inspect the house inside and out to make sure there little pet have not gained 50+ pounds all of a sudden, or done any damage.

I allow pets in anything with hardwood and tile only or old carpet that I will not replace. I do apply the same general rules about weight limits.

I'm a newbie, so take this for what it's worth, but what I've been doing is screening out people on the phone if they have a dog that's on my insurance carrier's dog breed blacklist. But I have a single family house. I can say from past apartment living situations that listening to someone else's dog freak out every time a door in the building opens gets tiresome.

I had one person who had sea turtles in a 40 gallong aquarium. I was a little uneasy about that because they can carry salmonella. As it happened, he ended up not applying for the house.

yeah, I am more worried about the noise than the destruction (but both are concerns). I don't think I'll have a real hard time filling units without allowing pets, so I'll probably hold to that policy for a while.

Anyone else have any thoughts?

A noisy dog keeps hoodlums out....as long as it isn't the hoodlums' dog.

I don't allow them. Have allowed cats in the past and their urine smell goes right through the hardwood floors. They even spray in the electrical outlets. Its almost impossible to get rid of the odor no matter how big your additional deposit might be.

:oops: I thought everyone paid BirdDogs for bringing them deals, not charged the extra!!!!!! :oops:

I allow dogs in houses with fenced yards.

I don't own apartments, but I think dogs in apartments might be a bad idea. 2 problems: there is no yard, so lazy tenants must get up early in the AM to potty walk the dog and they must come home from work to potty walk the dog. Not that I don't trust my tenants (yeah, right)

All tenants see the approved dog and think they can get a new puppy without asking, because their neighbor has a dog.

The plus to accepting pets is that you know what is in your unit. You get to meet the dog before accepting the tenant, and you get a pet fee or deposit.

I like refundable deposits because it motivates the tenant to try to prevent damage. Otherwise, they think all damage is pre-paid.

However, my pet fee is non-refundable for the first 12 months. Then it converts to a refundable deposit. I'm in a recreational area with lots of short term tenants who lie and claim they are planning to stay. If they know it is going to cost them an extra $300 to leave in 3 months, they move on to a different landlord

I don't have a size limit. I have a list of breeds I won't accept. Dogs and cats must be adults; no puppies, no kittens.

I meet and interview the dog before accepting the applicant. Dogs must be clean and well cared for and have at least a moderate semblance of manners.

I'd rather have 200 pound mastiff sleeping all day in my house than a 3 pound toy poodle peeing behind the sofa.

Larger breeds tend to be calmer and easier to house train. Actually, not any different to house train, but dog owners are more likely to make an effort when the accident is 8 gallons than they are when a pee spot is so small you can't see it. Dogs don't train themselves; someone has to focus their attention on house trainig for a couple of weeks.

Originally posted by P NW:
I allow dogs in houses with fenced yards.

I don't own apartments, but I think dogs in apartments might be a bad idea. 2 problems: there is no yard, so lazy tenants must get up early in the AM to potty walk the dog and they must come home from work to potty walk the dog. Not that I don't trust my tenants (yeah, right)

All tenants see the approved dog and think they can get a new puppy without asking, because their neighbor has a dog.

The plus to accepting pets is that you know what is in your unit. You get to meet the dog before accepting the tenant, and you get a pet fee or deposit.

I like refundable deposits because it motivates the tenant to try to prevent damage. Otherwise, they think all damage is pre-paid.

However, my pet fee is non-refundable for the first 12 months. Then it converts to a refundable deposit. I'm in a recreational area with lots of short term tenants who lie and claim they are planning to stay. If they know it is going to cost them an extra $300 to leave in 3 months, they move on to a different landlord


I lived in walk up apartment for years and someone moved in on the first floor (right next to the entry/exit door for the building) with a very excitable dog that was obviously not trained at all. I don't know if it would have driven me to move out but it was so irritating to have that thing start barking when coming in the front door, or have it jump all over me if the owner happened to be leaving the building at the same time as me. I also lived in another place that was worse. The woman next door would leave the dog alone in the apt. for long periods of time and it would bark for 10 or 20 minutes straight if there was a loud noise. A couple times I dropped a dish or glass on the floor in my own apartment by accident and the dog would hear it from next door and start yelping.

Responsible tenants with pets are better tenants usually than those without pets. I try not to take dogs but do if desperate. Interview the dog at the site because prospective tenants can't find many landlords that will allow pets. Ask what their "careplan" is for the pet during the day etc. If they don't have a good answer don't rent to them.

Just wrote a check for over $1000 to buff and recoat 1550 sq. ft. of lovely antique heart of pine flooring that a tenant confined too much.

I have a Dalmatian and she weighs in at 60 pounds and she lives on refinished wood floors. No damage in 7 years.

It's all about the owners...not the pets.

I only own SFH's, they all have hardwood floors. I've found that MOST tenants have dogs and/or cats. So I paint the hardwood floors, let the dogs go nuts, then just repaint it when I have a switchover. Floors look great and is cheap/easy to do. Thank you to MikeOH for the tip! :o)

For my condo, I simply go by the HOA CC&R's, which state 2 pets max (fish and birds don't count), and no dog over 20 or 30 pounds.

For our rental house, we allow 1 dog (possibly 2) since we like to attract nice normal families in that property, and many nice normal families have a dog (yeah, many jerks own dogs too, but it's THEM we don't want, not the dog)! Our current nice normal family have a small dog and a bird.

For both properties, we simply collect an extra security deposit to cover the pets. One former tenant in the condo had 2 cats and it wasn't any problem at all. The place looked like a model home after they left.

Instead of SIZE of dog, I'm more concerned with AGE of dog. Puppies, regardless of breed can be very destructive because they like to chew and aren't always housebroken. In contrast, we have a 4 year-old 65 pound boxer that doesn't cause any damage in our house whatsoever. Now our 2 year-old daughter... well, that's ANOTHER story! ;-)

However, all THAT being said, if you have an apartment complex, I assume there isn't a great deal of space for a large dog. Anything bigger than say a beagle, needs some room, like a decent sized yard to run, play, and stretch their legs. Keeping a large dog in small apartment without anything more than a balcony or patio is cruel, IMHO.

As a professional carpet cleaner who has cleaned over a thousand homes and apartments, I can tell you that other than too many kids (which you can't overtly or legally do anything about) pets will do the most damage to a residence. But all dogs are not the same. Little chiquaquas and other small dogs aren't much of a problem.

I would, however, not advise allowing wives over 300 lbs! Whoops! There I go again! :-)

TC

If you have 6, 12,18 units and you allow one dog per unit,,,your quickly running a pet motel.

You get ONE barking and they all have to chime in,,no matter how much owner says they NEVER do. They dont know what happens when they are not home.

Not all dogs get along with all others.

Agreed on asking owner for plan of care while they are gone all day.

Kids are easier to babysit than pets,,least they grow up and potty train,,pets NEVER do!!!

Apartments are best no pets,,,single family houses,,,maybe!!

Many dogs are quiet when the owners are home, but bark at everything that moves when they are gone all day at work. Subsequently, the owners end up thinking the neighbors are being picky. That's why in our town home complex, we would put a recorder out and let it run, then play it back for the owners.

Try running a biz from home, on the phone with custies with some mutt barking at every bird that flys by!

TC

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