Feedback on becoming Mobile Notary (SoCal)

9 Replies

I am thinking of getting my notary license to begin a Mobile Notary side gig. The goal would be to earn some extra side cash to save and to network with other real estate professionals. The thing is i would like to see if there is an actual need among the real estate community. I would like to provide value to others but ive been reading some information that certain lenders/escrow companies are starting to require people to use their own, in-house notary.

Can anyone verify if this has been your experience? 

Based on your personal experience in REI have you used a mobile notary?

Any input on this is greatly appreciated. The course and materials to get license is going to run me about $4-500 and about 12 hours of study and testing. I have no issues with the cost or time but i want to make sure that i will recoup my investment. I am currently working as a Licensed Insurance Agent in SoCal.  I know that notary's are used for a variety of different reasons but one of my goals by getting this is to focus on meeting other real estate professionals. 

I looked in to it a couple years ago after using one my first and only time. There’s one true association website you want to go to and make sure you get the add on needed for financial/contracts. The guy I used said there’s good money in it s long as you’re available every time you to do a job. (Like appraisals it was randomly assigned to people that have a history of being available.)

I am both a mobile notary(Northern Cal) and have used them many times.  I acquired my notary commission by attending a one day course at a local adult continuation school. It was proctored at the end of the day and I found out about ten days later that I passed. I dont do as much as I thought I would but i realized the need in a rural area where my investment properties are.

Hi Gabriel,

I think it is a great way to make some side income.  Be prepared to work after 5 pm and weekends.  The mobile notaries in my area make about $150 per signing.  If you are targeting real estate professionals you will need to get familiar with loan documents and closing settlement documents.  In my case, my clients are very busy so using a mobile notary is something I always use.

I worked with a mobile notary for the first time today. I didn't even know they existed. I'm fascinated by the potential--my notary said that he not only makes a livable income but also has met so many investors through his job, it's helped him expand his investment property portfolio. It may take time to build up a clientele base, but based off the little knowledge I've gained today, I think it's definitely worth researching!

Originally posted by @Bill Brandt :

I looked in to it a couple years ago after using one my first and only time. There’s one true association website you want to go to and make sure you get the add on needed for financial/contracts. The guy I used said there’s good money in it s long as you’re available every time you to do a job. (Like appraisals it was randomly assigned to people that have a history of being available.)

Bill kind of like me getting signed up to drive Lyft.. LOL.. figured with my Tesla I have no gas.. and I get bored sometimes so I though maybe I give folks a ride around and socialize a little. .. but then when I read the fine print that I had to accept dogs.. that was a no go in Oregon they would be wet and smelly and muddy.. so my lyft career never lyfted off LOL.. 

on a side note.. one gig I like that is real estate related for those looking for extra money is that of a transaction coordinator realtors really rely on those folks and you don't have to drive anywhere  computer great scanner and some skills.. my wife pays her 400.00 a file.. and she closed over 30 files last year.. so that's just one realtor and her coordinator has many realtors I bet she makes well over 100k a year from her home.. ( now she is very good I want to emphasize that ) 

@Jay Hinrichs

Sounds like a job for me. Tell her I’m interested in learning and I’ll take $395. :-)

I looked in to and even signed up for Uber with my volt, like you figured I would be bored and driving anyway. 

Then I remembered “I have stuff” and if I get in an accident while driving for Uber somebody might be tempted to sue me and take my stuff. 

The good old days when I had less stuff and could do whatever I wanted. :-)

Originally posted by @Bill Brandt :

@Jay Hinrichs

Sounds like a job for me. Tell her I’m interested in learning and I’ll take $395. :-)

I looked in to and even signed up for Uber with my volt, like you figured I would be bored and driving anyway. 

Then I remembered “I have stuff” and if I get in an accident while driving for Uber somebody might be tempted to sue me and take my stuff. 

The good old days when I had less stuff and could do whatever I wanted. :-)

its funny I think about wet muddy dogs and never even occurred to me about liablity.. you think liablity and of course in vegas you don't have any wet smelly dogs..  just got to watch the drunks on the strip they don't barf in your car LOL 

@Gabriel Mendez I am in SoCal as well (Huntington Beach), and have been considering this as side work as well after speaking at length with the notary I used for closing on my last out of state deal.  This guy has used notarizing as his primary income for the past 20 years and was incredibly happy with his lifestyle.  He said startup costs (certification, etc.) are around $500, you need to carry at least 15K in insurance (his recommendation), and you should register with the NNA and RotaryNotary.  In the hour I was signing with him he received two texts of new jobs, and said he made $100-150 a job, but you could end up driving all over Socal chasing work.