Personal Development

What Sets Apart Successful Real Estate Investors From Those Who Fail, Quit, or Never Get Started?

Expertise: Personal Finance, Personal Development
32 Articles Written
succeed-vs-fail

If you have listened to any of the 200+ BiggerPockets Podcast episodes, you have heard the famous question, “What sets apart successful real estate investors from those who fail, quit, or never get started?” This question is asked to every guest on the podcast, of which many if not all are in fact successful real estate investors. What I find fascinating is out of the 200+ episodes, you will hear all different kind of answers. So who is right?

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The answer is all of them. Oftentimes the answer you get is what the investor currently has to do to set themselves apart from those who fail, quit, or never get started. That target is constantly moving throughout the career and evolution of a real estate investor. What I realized is in my own career is the answer to that question has changed as my investing changed.

When you hear 200 different answers to the same question, you may be left thinking, “Who should I listen to?” This article will show you how to take the advice from all of the answers and use their wisdom at the most valuable time as you progress in your career.

Let’s look at some of what people say set the successful apart:

  • Hustle & Grit
  • Perseverance & Persistence
  • Passion & Dedication
  • Self Discipline & Self-Control
  • Networking & Relationships
  • Goals, Targets & Metrics
  • Continuous Learning & Reading
  • Your “Why”/Purpose
  • Systems & Procedures
  • Delegating & Leadership

So often when the person is asked, “What sets apart the successful investor?” their answer is focused on what they personally are working on in their own business to ensure their own success. This happens because it is at the front of their mind. The reality is all of the answers from all of the podcast guests are not only correct, but all the successful investors do them in some capacity.

People excel in different categories more than others. The list above is set in somewhat of an order. The order represents the evolution of an investor. Number one is what sets apart the successful when you are just getting started, but numbers 1-10 are what set apart the investor with a few more years under his/her belt. The trick is knowing when each discipline is needed and how much, when to add on the next and when to stay put. If you are a skilled entrepreneur, you will have a sixth sense for climbing this ladder while juggling these disciplines.

Related: 10 Simple, Everyday Things You MUST Do to Be a Successful Entrepreneur

What do all these traits really mean and how do they fit into your investing? Let’s talk about each, and I’ll share an example from my own career in each.

Hustle & Grit

This is the most basic starting point that is needed to get a real estate investment career off the ground and growing. Literally anyone has the capacity to utilize this very important discipline. Executing on it is hard and can be draining. When I think hustle and grit, I think of doing what other people aren’t willing or can’t do in order to set yourself apart. It’s about taking your hard knocks and getting back up. A very successful businessman once relayed some advice to me and said, “If you want to compete with the big guys, do something they can’t — something un-scalable, something only those willing to be in the trenches can do.” A great example of this would be door knocking. I guarantee you, an investor who walks neighborhoods knocking on 500 front doors a week trying to find leads will reach success faster than someone who looks on Zillow.

In the start of my career, I relied on grit. I had nothing else to give. I didn’t know much, I didn’t have much money, and I didn’t know people who had either or even that I should be looking for them. What I did have was hustle and lots of it. My partner and I worked 12 hour days, 7 days a week doing all the renovations on our rentals. We would drive around on trash night to collect scrap metal to pay for our needed materials we bought off Craigslist. There is no possible way we could sustain that or grow it beyond ourselves. But it worked. It got us going. We did what no one else would do in order to take the next step up the ladder.

Perseverance & Persistence

This is likely the most common answer to what sets the successful apart. The reason is this trait is likely one of the most frequently utilized over the entire career of a successful investor. Having perseverance is the act of never giving up. This could mean looking for deals, finding financing, or buying another rental after you just went through a terrible eviction. Oftentimes the successful have to persevere through the struggle that hustle and grit leave in their wake.

In our business, no one would lend us money back in 2011. We were in our early 20s with no W-2 income. We hustled, saved the cash, and started buying single-family homes to rent. It took us two years of repeating this process and persevering through the hardships to eventually land a cash-out refinance that started the exponential growth in our business. In real estate, things go wrong if you own one unit or 10,000 units — flip or wholesale. There is always something that will go astray. Those who are persistent and continue to solve the problems are those who continue to succeed.

perseverance

Passion & Dedication

Without a passion for what you are doing, you will quit. The path to becoming a successful real estate investor is too hard and takes far too much effort for you to complete without having any passion. To persevere through the hard knocks, passion for what you are doing is going to be needed. Without it, you will likely stay down for the count.

It’s hard to describe the passion I’ve always had for real estate. I remember during those beginning years of working 12-hour days in the Ohio winters in a house with no heat. The temperature would dip into the negatives. We would be at the house working before the sun was up. You would think on those mornings when my alarm when off, I would want to do anything but put on my cold, dirty work jeans. That makes sense, but because of my passion, I often woke up without an alarm. I would wake up from a dream where I was reviewing the needed materials I needed to pick up from Home Depot on the way to the property. I would open my eyes and be excited for what in the mind of almost anyone else would have been a horrible day to come.

Self-Discipline & Self Control

When interviewed on episode 124 of the BiggerPockets Podcast, my answer to the “what sets the successful apart” question was self-discipline. The reason I had this answer is because at the time, that was the step that was in the forefront of my own business. Our company had begun to make good money, we had large chunks of equity being removed from our rentals in cash-out refinances, and we were doing really well in flipping. That year, my net worth quadrupled, and I had made more money that year than the preceding 24 years of my life combined. It would have been really easy for us to say, “It’s time to buy fancy clothes, cars, houses,” etc. But instead, we stayed disciplined. We had a passion for what we were doing, and we knew if we stayed persistent and continued to hustle by reinvesting everything back into buying more property, we would see exponential benefits. We had the self-discipline to delay gratification to a later date.

When I was 17 years old, in high school working as a handyman on my nights and weekends, I bought an old 1998 Dodge Ram work truck. Seven years later in 2015, when we had made all this money and increased our net worth, we still were driving that same old Dodge Ram. Below is a picture of me and my business partner at a job site in 2015 with our old Dodge Ram that we drove until it couldn’t drive anymore.

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Related: The Unsugar-Coated True Story of What it Takes to Succeed as an Entrepreneur

Those with self-discipline have higher emotional intelligence and financial control, and they ultimately are more success in life and in wealth-building.

Relationships & Networking

Mentors, partners, lenders, cash buyers, motivated sellers — the list goes on and on. We see these relationship connections asked for on the BP Forums all the time. Any business will die without good relationships. However, when the successful investors say that relationships set those who fail apart from those who succeed, they are not telling you to go ask strangers to be a mentor, partner, etc.

The relationships they are referring to are relationships where value is exchanged. Relationships thrive when they are not one-sided. A great example of this is a newer investor looking for a mentor to help them understand analysis, renovation, and management. If the mentee simply asks, “Can you teach me analysis, renovation, and management?” the potential mentor will 99.9 percent of the time say no. However, the mentee could say something like, “If I knock on 500 doors per week until I find a lead, will you help/teach me how to analyze the deal to see if it makes sense from a renovation and management perspective? If we analyze it and the deal looks good, I will give you the lead to buy it if you show me how to write a contract.” This relationship will thrive because the mentee and mentor are both adding value. This can work in any type of relationship in business.

The investors who attribute their success to relationships are constantly trying to add more value than they take in their relationships.

In my own business, one of the many relationships I am grateful for is the one we have with our primary lender. This lender was the first bank to give us a chance back when we were first starting. Over the years, I brought local investor meet ups to this bank to drum up business for them. I have moved all of our business accounts over to their bank to help them meet deposit goals. I recommend this bank constantly. And most importantly, I perform on my loans just as agreed. After many years of building our relationship, this bank has lent us multiple millions to buy more property.

Without relationships, you will suffocate your growth and eventually burn yourself out.

Goal, Targets & Metrics

Imagine a plane flying at full speed high above the clouds. The radar, navigation, and all tracking electronics are off. The co-pilot says, “Where are we going?” and the pilot responds, “I don’t know, but were getting there fast.” You don’t want to run your business like these pilots.

Sometimes, in the beginning, it is necessary. Back when all you have is hustle and grit, often you find yourself working so hard that all you can really do is fly by the seat of your pants and hope you end up somewhere better than you were yesterday. As your company develops and you start bringing in relationships, you need to steady the plane and understand where you are going. Setting goals and defined targets for those goals using key metrics in your business is something the successful continue to hone as their business succeeds and data comes available.

I’ll be honest — we were flying by the seat of our pants for a while. We stayed in the hustle and grit phase longer than most. Once we began to develop, we started implementing accounting software, KPIs, goals, and targets.

Someone once told me you can’t improve what you do not measure. The successful investor can direct their business and see where it’s headed.

learning

Continuous Learning & Reading

Einstein said, “When you stop learning, you start dying.” This very idea is why many investors say continuous learning is what sets apart the successful investor from those who give up, fail, or never get started. This is even more true today than 20, 10, or even 5 years ago, as technology is changing things at a more rapid pace than ever. Successful investors understand that they do not know what they do not know. Because of this, they constantly are expanding their horizon.

In the beginning of an investment career, it is obvious you have to be learning. Where the mistake happens is when some investors have hustled, persevered through all the years of challenges, had the self-control needed, built strong relationships, and tracked their companies goals to the cent — but then they think they must know it all if they have done this well.

The investors who sustain success prioritize and never stop learning. Oftentimes this is the answer you will get from the investor who has great accomplishments but is looking for a way for their company to break through the ceiling in their next growth phase.

I learned most in the beginning through trial and error. Later, I began listening to the podcast and then audio books. Anytime I am driving, cutting the grass, or doing any other task that doesn’t take concentration, I typically have my headphones in expanding my horizons.

Your “Why”/Purpose

Your “why” refers to why you are doing what you are doing. Without this, you won’t make it through numbers 1-7. This is where passion is formed. Why would anyone in their right mind jump out of bed in the morning to work physically grueling 12-hour days, 7 days a week in the freezing cold while receiving no paycheck for 2 years? The answer to those types of questions is where you find the “why.” The successful investors set themselves apart from the quitters by using that reason as the fuel to succeed.

Like other things, I believe the “why” is a moving target that evolves with you as you develop. I know mine has. In the beginning, my “why” was to have enough money to pay for food, a place to live, and the ability to be safe. But then I quickly realized, “OK, I got the food, house, and safety.” So your “why” shifts. Later, my “why” was to provide a lifestyle to start a family on and build a foundation for long-term wealth. Once that was achieved, I realized what was really important to me was to be financially free.

I wouldn’t say I’m 100 percent there, but I know even if I take my foot off the gas and coast until I’m 30, I will likely make it there based on the relatively simple lifestyle I enjoy. So why would I bother to continue? We recently decided to add on a new business model and do syndications to buy large apartment complexes. Do I need to do this to reach my own financial freedom? Absolutely not. My “why” has shifted with me rising up through the human needs we all have. The reason is because my “why “ has new meaning and pushes me forward. I think financial success and spiritual fulfillment are two very different things. For me, spiritual fulfillment comes from being the best you can be while helping others do the same. I choose to continue to push on full steam and venture into syndication because I know that is where I can make the biggest positive impact on others using the skills I have.

Related: 6 Major Reasons to Invest in Real Estate (& How to Invest With Purpose!)

The investors who can look inside themselves and find this answer to why they can’t give up do everything in their power to solve their “why” and that sets them apart from those who are chasing money and inevitably fizzle out.

Systems & Procedures

The successful investors focus on creating a proven way and documenting it so it is not just another unpredictable event that will need to be addressed. We all have seen the investors who do not have systems. All they do all day is run around putting out the same types of fires over and over. They often have their phone glued to their face 70 percent of the day and never have time to grow the company.

In our company, we have a operations manual. That tells us how we do what we do. We use software to help simplify and direct operations. Successful investors differentiate themselves from the unsuccessful by putting these systems in place as their business grows. 

leadership

Delegating & Leadership

After the successful investor has learned to use all the preceding traits, they often focus on leading others to learn these traits and use them for the organization he/she has built. I believe this is one of the final ceilings to break through that sets the successful apart. They learn to lead. Once they earn the respect enough to lead, delegating is simple and the company will boom. The leader learns to build a team around them that trusts and respects them. They do this with clarity and empathy.

As our company has added employees and staff, I am learning how much I enjoy this part of a business. It’s rewarding to watch people who otherwise would have been strangers join together to follow a common goal using systems and procedures that have been set in place through years of hustle and perseverance.

What sets apart the successful investor from those who fail, quit, or never get started? A lot.

The reason you hear so many answers to this questions is because there are so many correct answers. Each answer will become true to an investor at different parts of their business. I have found they build on each other like a pyramid much more so than just completing one and moving on to the next. If delegating and leadership is the top of the pyramid and you have reached that that trait but you completely give up on the lower level of perseverance and persistence, that pyramid is likely to crumble and fall. I hope you all will take these traits and use them to set yourself apart from those who fail, quit, or never get started.

[Editor’s Note: We are republishing this article to help out our newer readers.]

What would YOU say is the most common reason investors fail, quit, or never get started? What truly sets apart successful investors from the rest?

Let me know your thoughts with a comment!

Jered Sturm is the co-founder of SNS Capital Group LLC. Starting in the industry 15 years ago as a maintenance technician for residential rental properties, Jered built on that experience to start a construction company that over a decade ago led him to begin purchasing investment property. Since his humble beginnings in the industry, Jered has quickly scaled his investments and now focuses on purchasing large apartment communities in the Cincinnati, Ohio market. While Jered's company has grown to own and manage over $30M in assets, they still focus on the core competency of buying, renovating, and maintaining investment rental property. Jered has been a featured guest on the BiggerPockets Podcast twice and has been contributing to the BiggerPockets blog since 2015. He looks forward to continuing to help others gain financial independence by sharing his experiences.

    Allen Herbert Investor from Baltimore, Maryland
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great Article!!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks, Allen I am glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for taking the time to comment.
    Colin Armstrong from Huntsville , Ontario
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    So much value! thankyou
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Awesome Colin. I am happy I was able to add value!
    Jerry W. Investor from Thermopolis, Wyoming
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Jered, Nice article, and I am impressed at how you have grown your company so quickly. There is a lot of work in doing real estate. Too many folks I know think it is just an hour or two a day.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for the kind words Jerry. Yes For me it’s more like 1-2 hours of planning just to take on the day haha. Thanks for the comment.
    Randy E.
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great article! I agree with the statement, “Those with self-discipline have higher emotional intelligence and financial control, and they ultimately are more success in life and in wealth-building.” My wife and I have practiced the art of delayed gratification for so long that we feel a little guilty for recently purchasing an RV. However, we’ve done well with real estate and are on the leeward side of the mountain in terms of investing and age, so as they say, “you’ve never seen a hearse pulling a U-Haul.” We’ve reached a point where it’s time to make some different memories.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Yep! There is no shame in enjoying the fruits of your labor. Congrats on your success.
    Sonia Spangenberg from Manassas, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    I do want to comment that as I looked at the list of attributes, the ones I struggle with jump out as condemning and initially cause one to question whether or not they can do this. But, I am finding that they should actually be personal challenges to find the “How” to improve ones self in that area by starting with small steps. We all have strengths and weaknesses on the list. Each can be as strengthening or debilitating to the big picture as the other. The goal is to work on the ones we are weaker at until they become a strength. Then move to the next weak area. Continuing the cycle for a lifetime of continuous improvement. ; – ) That’s my plan. I am recommending the Tools4Wisdom Planner 2017… 4.6 out of 5 stars $27.97 found on Amazon to help with the goal implementation process. Saw that mentioned elsewhere on BP and loved it when I looked at it. It’s quite a step up from the planner I have been using.
    Sonia Spangenberg from Manassas, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Jared, I also want to comment that your point by point discussion of each of the attributes was well done and often broadened my thoughts on the subject. Thanks, Nice job
    Randy E.
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great article! I agree with the statement, “Those with self-discipline have higher emotional intelligence and financial control, and they ultimately are more success in life and in wealth-building.” My wife and I have practiced the art of delayed gratification for so long that we feel a little guilty for recently purchasing an RV. However, we’ve done well with real estate and are on the leeward side of the mountain in terms of investing and age, so as they say, “you’ve never seen a hearse pulling a U-Haul.” We’ve reached a point where it’s time to make some different memories. Reply Report comment
    Cameron Garry
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hey Jered, Very interesting post , Thank you for this useful information. All points are considerable for successful real estate investor.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hey, Cameron I’m glad you found it useful. I will try to keep producing good content for all the readers.
    Jessie Niu from Columbus, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great info! Jered, I enjoyed every article of yours! Good job!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Jessie! It was a long one so thanks for taking the time to not only read it but to leave a comment. I appreciate them all.
    Julie Kern Investor from Kennesaw, GA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Love this Jered!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Hey Julie. Its good to see a familiar name on here saying they liked the article!
    Shane Jeanfreau Investor from New Orleans, Louisiana
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Read this article twice! Love it man and congrats on your growth!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Shane. I try to put together useful content, so I’m happy you enjoyed it enough for a second read.
    Carl Mcknight Wholesaler from Fresno, California
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    You nailed it Jared! So many people look at successful people in the world and see the end result of success and commonly think things like “they’re lucky”, and do not realize it takes each and every one of the traits you mentioned to get there.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Yep! It takes doing all these things to get in the way of luck. Thanks for the comment.
    Isaac Knight
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great article, love this Jered. Thanks for sharing you experience and knowledge.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Happy to do so Isaac, Thank you for commenting and letting me know these articles are helping others like I hope for.
    Pavel Yurevich Investor from Elgin, Illinois
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Wow! So much information! I can already tell that this is going to be one of those “come-back-and-read-again” posts for me. Thanks, Jered! Also, I want to express my admiration for the way you handled your life and your business. Many people could learn from that.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Pavel, Thank you for your kind words. I have been writing for BP for a while now and when I finished this article I thought if people could read only one of my article I would want it to be this one. The fact that you and others have enjoyed it and it hopefully has helped you makes writing this one and all the other worth it. I really appreciate you taking the time to leave a comment.
    Michael Dibetta Flipper from Santa Fe, New Mexico
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    On target! You took over where Kiyosaki left off. I will continue to breathe in the fresh air at bigger pockets. Thanks for the hand up. Wish me luck on my almost finished live in flip; $116k spent, $76k owed, Comps $140ish
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Wow, those are big shoes to fill following up Kiyosaki on a mindset type article! I appreciate the kind words for sure and I am very happy it has helped you. It sounds like you have a great start going. Keep up the great work, and thank you for the comment.
    Rosetta F. Investor from New Castle, Delaware
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Great article!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Rosetta I am glad you enjoyed it!
    Eric Christians from Fargo, ND
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Nice article to read on a Sunday morning drinking coffee. Reminds me of my Sundays when I would work a 10 hour day and consider it a short day relative to Monday-Saturday. Hustle & Grit definitely deserve to be first on the list!
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks, Eric I am glad I could brighten your Sunday morning! Thanks for taking some of your time to read it and leave a comment. I write these with the single goal to help others and comments like yours keep me writing. Glad I could take you back to the 10 hour a day glory days 😉
    Sonia Spangenberg from Manassas, VA
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Terrific read. This one should be read multiple times in one’s investing career and at various stages. Pragmatic, balanced, higher level approach to sorting through the huge variety of advice, especially for newbies. Brilliant article. It was reassuring to me. Thanks
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thank you, Sonia, your comment means a lot. I hoped this would be my most popular article ever because of how much value I think it can add to all investors. Even though it is not one of most popular comments like yours inspire me to keep writing. I am glad I could help you. Thank you for the comment.
    Jeff DeLeon
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Here, here! So true. Thanks for the good read.
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thanks Jeff I am glad you enjoyed it.
    Manuel Carrasquillo Real Estate Professional from Lancaster, Pennsylvania
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    This was truly a wonderful and insightful read! Thank you for sharing your experience .
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for the kind words Manuel. It means a lot that you enjoyed it and thank you for taking your time to leave a comment!
    oswin william
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Best blog I ever read about real estate business….Sure I will bookmark this portal
    Jered Sturm Investor/Syndicator from Cincinnati, Ohio
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Oswin Thank you for that. When I wrote this I felt like it was one of my best. It took me a while to write it out so knowing you liked it so much is a great feeling. Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed it!
    Jonathan Stokes
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    That is so informative and crisp, especially for people who are fearful of investing in real estate. There is a certain set of principals followed by successful investors, due to which they are able to close deals smoothly. Firstly, it is important to set a goal as to what you would want to achieve out of investing in real estate, apart from the money, of course. Secondly, one should determine his/her risk appetite and limitations for an honest evaluation of what they are good at. Thirdly, successful investors are really good at research and networking, which enables them to assess the potential of a particular project and subsequently locate interested buyers.
    Jonathan Stokes
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    That is so informative and crisp, especially for people who are fearful of investing in real estate. There is a certain set of principals followed by successful investors, due to which they are able to close deals smoothly. Firstly, it is important to set a goal as to what you would want to achieve out of investing in real estate, apart from the money, of course. Secondly, one should determine his/her risk appetite and limitations for an honest evaluation of what they are good at. Thirdly, successful investors are really good at research and networking, which enables them to assess the potential of a particular project and subsequently locate interested buyers.
    Jonathan Stokes
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    That is so informative and crisp, especially for people who are fearful of investing in real estate. There is a certain set of principals followed by successful investors, due to which they are able to close deals smoothly. Firstly, it is important to set a goal as to what you would want to achieve out of investing in real estate, apart from the money, of course. Secondly, one should determine his/her risk appetite and limitations for an honest evaluation of what they are good at. Thirdly, successful investors are really good at research and networking, which enables them to assess the potential of a particular project and subsequently locate interested buyers. Reply Report comment
    Grant Wise
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    My team at Grant Wise Real Estate really enjoyed the content of this article. Grant Wise Arkansas would love for anyone looking to boost their real estate business to contact us as well. Grant Wise Facebook Ads have proven to be an amazing tool for boosting sales!
    Edmund Chiang from Oakland Gardens, New York
    Replied almost 3 years ago
    Awesome article Jered and very inspirational. I especially liked how you fleshed out each trait. I think I’ve heard a lot of these before but I loved how you made it relevant to real estate. I greatly respect that your “why” is to help people and it is evident in all that you do. That is a good measure of a persons character!!
    Ezichi Oha Wholesaler from North Hollywood, California
    Replied about 2 years ago
    good piece of advice and i completely agree
    Darryl Putnam Investor from Mountain View, CA
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Jered, Thanks for writing the article that has been rolling around in my head for the last few months. You did a much better job than I would have done any way. 🙂 Truly enjoyed your thoughts and insights. And now I can take writing this off my to do list. Thanks again!
    Darryl Putnam Investor from Mountain View, CA
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Jered, Thanks for writing the article that has been rolling around in my head for the last few months. You did a much better job than I would have done any way. 🙂 Truly enjoyed your thoughts and insights. And now I can take writing this off my to do list. Thanks again!
    Martin Carstens Investor from Edmonds, Washington
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Jared, I enjoyed your article! Even more so, the second time around! Great points for anyone to think twice about. We all go down a different path, andy these points help, sort out the one we are heading down. As a sea going captain, I spend eight months a year at sea. When home, I non stop turn & burn on real estate. As I close in on number eleven SFR, I can tell you. Anything is possible! Thank you for sharing!
    Ivan Montanez from Jackson Heights, New York
    Replied about 2 years ago
    very well….insppiring. and logical.. thx for posting!!
    Allan Rosso Real Estate Agent from Brentwood
    Replied almost 2 years ago
    Episode 205 helped me develop a gameplan for a property I had been trying to decide whether or not to mess around with it for about a month now. First step: meet at the property with my inspector, and figure out how much it’ll cost me to get it inspected. It’s not your typical property, so it can be a little intimidating.
    Alma Arches Developer from Fort Walton Beach, FL
    Replied over 1 year ago
    Thank you!!! I’m taking all these traits and use them. I’ve failed but have not quit. I fell down and dusted my self back up full force. Real Estate is my true passion and I will do whatever it takes to reach my goals and beyond.
    Amber Porter from B, WA
    Replied over 1 year ago
    Appreciated the article. It’s always amazing how many opportunities can arise when you start heading down the path. My spouse and I have expanded our business/investments GREATLY over the past year by simply discussing ideas over a glass of beer or salad in a restaurant. Just putting heads together and thinking of new ways to do things over time led us to take some serious steps and act on them. You change the way you think and can build on those ideas.
    Charles Brown from Maryland
    Replied about 1 year ago
    Very good article! Great application and reinforcement of business fundamentals to the real estate business. I really like how Jered incorporated their actual experiences and approach to the topics. I will be referring back to this as I build my business!
    Dan Nguyen from Carrollton, Texas
    Replied 10 months ago
    Nice article. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.
    Wasay Kamran Waraich
    Replied 15 days ago
    Maximos real estate property portfolio provides detailed descriptions of all new brand properties. All the properties have been personally inspected by us and we provide a guarantee to take full responsibility for the features described. Maximos Real Estate offers properties that suit every budget and taste. Our professional team will help you with all the formalities at every stage of the buying process, which has recently become much more simple in Turkey than in most of other countries. There are no restrictions in transferring your property proceeds from Turkey to your native country. There is a freedom of international capital transfers.