My tenant hasn't signed the renewal lease yet

9 Replies

I dropped off the renewal lease about two months ago, his current lease ends the last day of this month. His father who is elderly and cannot drive is living with the tenant who is on the lease. The house is in good repair (this is my first rental property) and I take care of issues promptly like the washer that broke, I bought a new one, I changed the toilet when it stopped working, I paid a roofer to put a new roof on, I paid a mason to repair the front entrance stairs. I called the leasing agent who got the current tenant in and he said that my asking rent was very reasonable and he could get a new tenant in no problem.

The current tenant (his first year) always pays on time and takes care of the place. I told the tenant that I have to know soon and he said he will let me know if he will renew the lease in a day or two. 

Any suggestions? I self manage this property so I deal with any thing that comes up, but I use a realtor to find tenants.

I would say something to the tenant (text or e-mail-wise) similar to: Please let me know when you would like for me to pick up the signed lease. If instead you plan on moving please give me your 30 day notice. Thanks. 

The end of the lease is July 31 which is less than 30 days. The two days from when the tenant said he would let me know if he will renew is tomorrow. In other words, if he does not renew then 30 days notice would be August 5th. I plan to call the tenant tomorrow, the second day and ask him if he is renewing. What's crazy is that when the tenant moved in he filled every room including the living room with bookcases full of books, he has the entire basement filled with his personal belongings, it looks like he is going to live there for ten years.

When you need the tenant to take action, always include a deadline and a consequence for failing to perform. When I offer a lease renewal, I give them a hard deadline by which it must be signed and returned. If it is not, they are automatically enrolled in a month-to-month extension at a higher rate. Once they see that higher charge, they'll figure out how to operate a pen again.

Thanks for the info. The lease the tenant signed when he moved in a year ago states that the lease ends July 31 (this month) and that if the tenant does not return the signed lease after 30 days when he receives the renewal lease then he is rejecting the renewal. Going by that, he has rejected the renewal. I had gotten a call from a landlord in the area that the tenant had applied for his 3 bedroom apartment. I told the landlord that I was surprised that he was looking elsewhere, I thought he was renewing. I called the tenant and he said that in a day or two he will let me know if he is renewing. I don't think the tenant ever read the lease or I don't think he cares? The father who lives with the tenant but is not on the lease doesn't want to move.

I agree with @Karl B. Communication is key to ensure you and your tenant are on the same page. Often, poor communication between landlord and tenants lead to issues that could be resolved easily. 

Hope that helps!!

Originally posted by @Nathan G. :

When you need the tenant to take action, always include a deadline and a consequence for failing to perform. When I offer a lease renewal, I give them a hard deadline by which it must be signed and returned. If it is not, they are automatically enrolled in a month-to-month extension at a higher rate. Once they see that higher charge, they'll figure out how to operate a pen again.

^^^What he said :-)

I do the exact same thing that Nathan mentioned above. 10% MTM Rent Premium if they don't give 30 day notice. Some will end up begging for a new 12 month lease the following month.

Thanks for the input. I texted the tenant this morning saying, 



Please let me know when you would like for me to pick up the signed lease. If instead you plan on moving please give me your 30 day notice. Thanks.

He came right back and said



Ill give you the lease whenever you next stop by

I now have the signed renewal lease with a small bump up from the rate of the first lease.