Log In Sign Up
22 Doors After “Starting from Negative” w/Billy Dha Kidd

22 Doors After “Starting from Negative” w/Billy Dha Kidd

48 min read
The BiggerPockets Podcast

As a Guest you have free article(s) left

Join BiggerPockets (for free!) and get access to real estate investing tips, market updates, and exclusive email content.

Sign in Already a member?

Billy Dha Kidd is better known for his rapping than his real estate skills, but both careers are worth celebrating. Billy’s early life was anything but comfortable — growing up in El Salvador, he was used to no running water and no electricity. He likes to say that he didn’t start at zero but started at negative one-hundred. Billy’s family immigrated to the United States when he was 10 years old, moving first to California and then later to Nebraska.

As a teenager, Billy began rapping as a way for him to express himself but found he loved the craft. Rapping allowed Billy to fill his time with something positive, instead of taking the wrong path many of his friends were on. His rap taught him sales skills, business skills, how taxes work, and most importantly, how to make money.

Reading stories of generational wealth, Billy was compelled to start investing in real estate. He got his first deal, learned a lot about the BRRRR strategy, and continued to put his knowledge to work. Now, he’s sitting on twenty-two doors between eighteen different properties. He gives credit to simply taking responsibility for his outcomes, instead of blaming others or the system around him.

Click here to listen on Apple Podcasts.

Listen to the Podcast Here

Read the Transcript Here

Brandon Turner:
This does the BiggerPockets Podcast, show 542, where we sit down with Billy Dha Kidd, The Lord of the Land.

Billy Dha Kidd:
You could look at it the other way or this way, it’s all mindset, honestly. People say they’re waiting for the economy to change or the real estate market to change in order for them to jump on. And literally they know what needs to change is their philosophy. Their mindset is what needs to change. Nothing else matters once you do that. And so change your thinking. And once I changed that thinking, everything around me changed. I stopped blaming the government, I stopped crying about taxes or the market., I took responsibility.

Brandon Turner:
What’s going on, everyone? It’s Brandon Turner, host of the BiggerPockets Podcast, the show where it’s our mission to lead you down the path to financial freedom. We do that by bringing on expert investors and taking them through tactics, the mindset, the mistakes that led to their success so that you can take the next steps toward living your dream life. And of course, here with me is my cohost, Mr. David Greene. David Greene, what’s up, man?

David Greene:
Welcome, Brandon. I also want to add that if anyone is new here on this podcast, they should check out the Ultimate Beginner’s Guide. It’s a great little ebook, a quick read. And the best part, totally free. You can find it at biggerpodcasts.com/UBG for Ultimate Beginner’s Guide.

Brandon Turner:
That’s sounded like a quick tip. Was that the quick tip for today?

David Greene:
It was pretty quick. It was the quickest quick tip I’ve ever given.

Brandon Turner:
All right. You are not known for being torth. So we’ve got David “Verbose” Greene today. And our guest, again, today is Billy Dha Kidd. He is a musician, a hip hop artist, an Instagram celebrity, we’ll call him that, and really, all around cool dude who’s done some awesome stuff in real estate. Owns up to 22 units right now, closing on a few more shortly, financial freedom… Quit his job a couple years ago, also does a construction company, has a bunch of other cool stuff, a management company, all this cool stuff. You’re going to learn about it today.

Brandon Turner:
And what’s so cool about today’s interview is, he’s just so darn relatable. He didn’t come from a ton of money. He came from actually what he calls, not starting from zero, but starting from negative to get to he is today. And so it’s one of those shows that’s inspirational and educational all wrapped in one. So that said, before we get to it, I’ve got a couple of quick things that cover first. In case you missed the announcement, I think I announced it a couple weeks ago maybe, I’m not sure when it was. Anyway, in case you didn’t hear, I’m going to be taking a sabbatical from the BiggerPockets Podcast indefinite.

Brandon Turner:
I don’t know when I’ll be back, but my last episode’s going to be end of this year. I still love you all, I love BiggerPockets, I love everything. But we’re going to be bringing in some more hosts to help. But I’ll be back again to sub in here and there, but I’m going to do some focus on Open Door Capital and my family, and maybe get myself some better surfing time in. So, in case you’re wondering where I am after the New Year, that’s where I’m going to be. But anyway, more on that if you go back and listen to episode of 537, where David and I talk about some of our favorite books. I just wanted to give you guys a heads up in case you didn’t hear that episode.

Brandon Turner:
I’ll put more of that information on my Instagram as well, @BeardyBrandon, and we’ll go from there. David Greene, anything you want to say before we jump into today’s interview with Billy Dha Kidd?

David Greene:
I really liked that Billy took a lot of things in life he did that we probably wouldn’t consider successful. They weren’t unsuccessful, he just did things that didn’t get the result he wanted. And he accumulated lessons from those “failures,” which he applied to real estate investing, which he has been very successful at. And that is a very encouraging concept for people to grasp, that because you tried something and it didn’t work out, it does not mean it was a waste of your time or that you failed. You very well learned things through that endeavor that will actually click into place when you find the right thing for you. So keep trying new stuff.

Brandon Turner:
There we go. Great advice today. The second quick tip from David Greene. With that said, let’s get into today’s interview with The Lord of the Land, Billy Dha Kidd.

Brandon Turner:
Billy Dha Kidd, welcome to the BiggerPockets Podcast, man. Good to have you here.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Man, same. Thanks for having me. It’s been a while that we’ve been going back and forth on Instagram, so I’m pumped. So let’s do this.

Brandon Turner:
Yeah, me too, man. It’s been fun to see you on Instagram and chat with you, but I don’t know your story, so I’m going to dig into it today. So why don’t we start at the very beginning? What’s your background? Where’d you come from? How’d you get into this world of real estate?

Billy Dha Kidd:
My name is Billy. I go by Billy Dha Kidd, which is D-H-A K-I-D-D AKA BDK. I also started branding, Lord of the land is what I want to start branding for landlord stuff because I’m investing-

David Greene:
Instead of landlord, that’s funny.

Brandon Turner:
I like it.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, pretty clever, right? People always say that they started from or zero from nothing, and I always like to tell people that I wish I would’ve started from zero, I started from negative 100. I was born in El Salvador. I grew up with no running water, no electricity. I remember my mom had to start a fire like a camping trip, basically, to cook for us. So poverty, violence, and then some domestic violence with my stepfather back then. And so my mother decided to leave for the US for a better life in hopes of one day also bringing me and my sister along with her. She left us with my grandma out there and among other aunts that were helping us take care of us.

Billy Dha Kidd:
There was basically some physical and mental abuse going on, my mom started hearing about it here in The States at that time. So about three years after she had left, she came back, got us and brought us to the US. I always also like to say that it wasn’t by choice. I was 10 years old, brought us to the US. We lived in Santa Ana for a few years. Once I got to Santa Ana, man, I remember I felt like I had made it. We had carpet, so I felt like I was a king. We had a running toilet, so that was amazing. It’s like the little stuff that we take for granted here. I remember we used to live in a two bedroom apartment and one bedroom was for me, my sister and my mom while the other bedroom was for another full family.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And at times, we even rented the living room just so we could be able to afford the rent, basically. Moved back and forth. We went to Oakland, I remember, at one point. I’m a Raiders fan.

David Greene:
Oh, you were in my hood, Billy.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Oh, was I?

David Greene:
I’m in Oakland all the time. Yeah.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Nice. That’s amazing. And I’m a Raiders fan. But at that time, the area that my mom had moved to was a little too much, basically, the crime and everything.

David Greene:
Which part of Oakland was it? East Oakland

Billy Dha Kidd:
I don’t remember, I’ll be honest with you. I just remember we heard gunshots on one of the nights, and it was only like a two week stay that we did and we came right back Santa Ana. And then my mom decided to move to Nebraska after talking to an aunt that we had here. And in Nebraska, rent was cheaper, everything was cheaper. So she found the perfect world, you could say. So we moved out here, no family. My aunt actually ended up moving probably within the year that we moved here, so no family. So as a single mother, seeing her struggle like that, it was the fire that I had, you could say.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And I never really had anyone to give me advice. Obviously, I couldn’t call a father, a male figure to give me any advice. If anything, I’m the one who gave my mom advice, because at 18 years old, when I was trying to fix my credit, I had to help her fix her credit. And even buying my first house at 24, then that’s when she ended up buying her house because I put her through the process. I never really had any guidance with that. But once in Nebraska, then we also had a little bit of help, food stamps and Section 8. It seemed like poverty was always there around us, if that makes sense.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And to make things even worse, while I was in Nebraska in high school, then I started hanging out with the wrong crowd, alcohol, drugs, parties, skipping school, just doing dumb stuff. And I think a lot of it was from not high having a father figure, which obviously it’s easy to blame that. But now that I look back I didn’t have to do half of the stuff that I did. But obviously, when you don’t have guidance, then it’s easier to do it. That’s when I fell in love with hip hop, was around that time. And I remember hearing some Spanish [Sharp 00:08:17] well and it made me think, “You know what, I can do that too.”

Billy Dha Kidd:
I started free-styling at parties. And then I remember I bought my first studio time when I was 16 years old. So really music is what saved me. At that time, there were some peers that were getting locked up while they were doing crazy stuff. I was taking my struggles and my pain through the mic, so it was like therapy for me. And that’s when I recorded my first album. And that first album, I actually got signed to a major distribution deal through Universal. It was probably the best thing I did, now looking back, but at the time it was the worst thing because they ended up basically taking my album.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And at the time, I had to put all my savings that I saved from working at fast food. Plus, I had to borrow money from friends, family, and I even took out my first credit card, which it helped me because that’s how I started my credit, it was with a $500 credit for my first album. I recorded it. I made 1,000 copies and I hit the streets with those 1,000 copies and I just started selling them here in the Midwest. Again, the label never did their part. So since they never did their part, that’s where I realized, “You know what, I need to step up,” and I started my first LLC.

Billy Dha Kidd:
So after all that, it was a great thing. I remember MySpace was big at the time, and that was really the only promotional. Otherwise, I had to hit the streets with CDs. A couple thousand CDs at 10, 15 bucks a pop, that was a nice little come up at that time. But it taught me a lot, it taught me taxes, it taught me accounting. And so I was able to copy and paste the process to my next ventures after that.

David Greene:
I would venture to propose that your experience with that entrepreneurial, small business endeavor you took off with gave you a foundation that all the knowledge you learned about real estate had a place to settle into. I don’t have a great analogy for that, I’ve just seen it so many times that people who, let’s say you just went from fast food straight to real estate. When you learn things about real estate, you don’t know how to classify that information or what to do with it, and so they fail. Versus when they had a job or an opportunity or an experience in life that gave them some kind of a foundation in how business worked, income, expenses, management. When they get into real estate, it clicks. They’re like, “Oh, I just get it.”

David Greene:
Maybe similar to how like the wrestler white belt going into jujitsu class has a massive advantage over the basketball player. It’s not the same, but it gives them a foundation to build on. So for people listening, I think that’s a really big piece to take from what Billy’s about to talk to us about, that’s why you got to keep doing stuff, you’ve got to keep moving forward, you got to keep taking action, because you never know. Even if that one thing didn’t make you explode, what you learned there could contribute to later. I have a couple questions for you here, Billy. The first one is, tell us what your portfolio looks like today.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Right now, I am at 22 doors. They’re all single families. Duplexes has been my niche that I’ve tried to grow. Right now, I’m working on a flip. I did a flip last year and I got a rental that I’m about to get under contract.

David Greene:
So how many total?

Billy Dha Kidd:
22 total.

David Greene:
Okay. 22 units or properties?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Units, doors.

David Greene:
Units. And then over how many properties is that?

Billy Dha Kidd:
18. So there’s a few duplexes in there, but most of them are single family.

David Greene:
So you’ve got some experience with knowing what to look for, seeing what goes wrong, as well as managing the assets, which is, in my opinion, what shows like ours and other shows don’t get into enough. We’re always talking about how to get that deal, but then once you get it, what’s that line in the Joker, “I’m like a dog chasing cars, I don’t know what to do with it once I catch it.” That’s a big part of real estate. First off, let’s hear about your first deal, and then we’ll ask you about how you’re managing these doors you have under control.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Sounds good. The first deal, the agent that I had at the time helping me, I was brand new and the agent that was helping me basically almost gave up on me because I was so, “Oh, I want this much, I can only spend this much.” I had it all lined up. And now looking back, it’s like, “Okay, I understand.” And they weren’t really investors friendly, but they worked with me and we got a few, probably like three, four doors that we work together at that beginning stage. But the first house, 50 grand is what I found it for. They wanted originally 80, and from 80, I offered 75.

Billy Dha Kidd:
I always tell people always offer less, that’s always the asking price. Obviously, what they’re asking is not what you’re going to give. And then there were some roof issues that the house had, so I started a roofing company a year and a half before that. And so that really helped me get into this deal like, “Oh, hey, I know a roofer.” So basically we took over the house, we did the roof, and now it’s worth probably 150.

David Greene:
And that was in Omaha?

Billy Dha Kidd:
In Lincoln.

David Greene:
Lincoln. Okay. All right. So with that deal, what drew you to it?

Billy Dha Kidd:
So with the music and then the construction company that I started, basically, I started noticing that it’s like, “Okay, I need something for the future.” And that’s where I started learning about generational wealth. And that is why I try to stay away from flipping. I do some flip, if it’s a great deal, I’ll do it. But that was like the drive behind that. And like I said, since then, it’s been a great path.

David Greene:
And you bought that with money saved up from working in fast food?

Billy Dha Kidd:
When I was a teen, I used to work fast food. And when I was 18, I started a job at a call center. And in that call center, that’s where I actually worked for 14 years; aging myself now. But I worked for 14 years there, and that was my last job, almost going on two years now.

David Greene:
I’m curious, what did you learn at that call center that you now use in your business that maybe other people don’t?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Great question. Customer service. It was over the phone, obviously, a call center, but I learned customer service. And before it was a customer service, it was a telemarketing firm. I was literally in the middle when the government cracked down on telemarketing, I’m sure you guys remember hearing about it. And so the company pivoted into customer service at that time. So sales and customer service. And honestly, man, I’ll tell you right now, at that time, I talk about it on my book, I was happy like, “Oh my God, the longer I can keep a job, the more I’m better in society,” if that makes sense.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Mom was proud. The wife was actually on the opposite end. She would basically go out and find a job every year or two. And I was like, “Oh my God, you’re crazy.” That’s what I talk about in the book because the book is called The Power of Being Uncomfortable. And now looking back, I wish that I would’ve quit after a year or two of being in that firm and maybe go get a job at a property management company. And then after that, maybe go get a handyman job because that would’ve taught me more that I would need to know now, if that makes sense. Society did that to me, the longer you could work at a job, the better you’ll be, I guess.

David Greene:
Were these outgoing calls or were these incoming calls?

Billy Dha Kidd:
100% outgoing at the beginning. And then after that, they were customer service. I moved up as a manager, so it was a little bit easier for me after.

David Greene:
There’s people that make the argument that everybody in a country should be required to join the military like they do in Israel because it gives you a perspective that you wouldn’t get just at whatever your family happened to expose you to. And I think it creates a collective like, “I am a part of something bigger.” I really feel for anyone that’s going to work in sales or something like real estate investing where there’s a sales component that you have to be reaching out and hunting. That might be a better way to put it, someone has to hunt what they want.

David Greene:
They should work in a call center, because I can imagine having a cold call people and figure out how to make this conversation not awkward, how to adjust your tone to cater to… There’s probably a lot of soft skills that you learned in there that help you now where your competition’s like, “I don’t know. I don’t want to call them. What if they’re mean to me?” So can you share just a little bit about how that affected your mindset with a ways that you can now reach out to people where you see others struggle with that?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Oh yeah, for sure. Even starting with my CDs, I wasn’t scared to go up to somebody and be like, “Hey, best CD you’re going to buy out of right now. Where you’re at right now in the area, best CD you’re going to buy.” I wasn’t scared of doing that. I would post up at a Walgreens, a local Walgreens in Omaha, just the areas here, Denver, and I would just literally play my music through my van. I had to wrap that van. So yeah, I wasn’t scared to do that because of that job. It’s the same with real estate. When I talk to some of these sellers, those skills come to mind, there’s some certain questions…

Billy Dha Kidd:
For example, if I was selling a t-shirt, for example, I would going to be like, “So, do you want to buy it?” It’d be more like, “Okay, so what color do you want? Hey, what size are you?” Those are the little stuff that I learned in that call center that has definitely helped me now.

Brandon Turner:
That’s cool, man. All right. I want to jump back into your story a little bit. You got that first property out there in Lincoln. Is that where all your properties are at, is Lincoln?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah.

Brandon Turner:
Okay, cool. And Lincoln’s a cheaper market. You said 50K, I think it was that first one?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, for sure. Yep.

Brandon Turner:
That’s awesome. All right. So let’s talk about how you built that. Because no matter how cheap the market is, I don’t care, buying 22 doors is a monumental feat. And most people listening to this show are probably like, “Shoot, I can’t even get my first deal.” How did you do that? If you could talk broad, how did you go from that first deal to owning all these properties now, 18 some properties and buying more? How’d you build your team? How’d you finance them? How’d you find them? Tell us about that.

Billy Dha Kidd:
The first few were just through the MLS. Actually, I want to say up to probably 10 doors, it was just MLS. I wasn’t doing anything special. My brain had just shifted at that time, like I said, wanting to build generational wealth at that point. Basically, I just started looking through Zillow, nothing special. So anybody out there listening, start with Zillow, start with Realtor, all those websites that you can go to. You could even put down the numbers that you want to spend and hit a quick search and you could find some deals. A lot of times also what I did is I followed the house that maybe I wanted. So I always hit the follow, the like, or whatever you want to call it.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And then there were times where maybe the deal fell through for whoever was going to purchase it, and a few months later, I got a notification saying, “Hey, this house is back on the market.” So now I would go in there as soon as they came back, knowing that, “Hey what? These people are probably more than likely going to lower the price. They want to sell it quicker now that it fell through.” That’s actually helped me a couple times. Yeah, I didn’t do nothing special until later on, which was the beginning of last year, then I started putting up banded signs and then I started hitting up some real estate meetings, wholesalers. I just started telling people, “Hey, I’m an investor.”

Billy Dha Kidd:
I came more out of the shell, if that makes sense. I became The Lord of the Land at that point.

Brandon Turner:
The Lord of the Land.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yep. Honestly, just letting people know that you’re an investor will get you. And then from there, I met an older investor that was selling one property that had a portfolio. I would let him know, “Hey, once you get ready to sell the other ones, let me know.” So that’s really how I did that. And then last year, I got the eight doors. Eight doors, I want to say, last year alone, just off of that.

Brandon Turner:
Wow. That’s awesome, man. What about financing? Were you saving up down payments for all these? Are you doing any other credit strategies?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I’ve been doing the BRRRR method a lot. Thanks to David Greene. I read your book too on that and it’s a great book. I started doing BRRRR. And honestly, the biggest thing I see that even with that strategy that stops people is the refinancing part. “Oh, I got to take this long.” But what I’ve been doing that worked for me is talk to different bankers. Once you get that no, going back to my job. It’s like you get that no, it gets you closer to that yes. And when one banker would say, “Oh, sorry. Yeah, we don’t do that.” I would go to the next one and the next one, until I start finding banks that would actually work with what I wanted to do. And that’s how I did that.

Brandon Turner:
That’s great, man. All right. The BRRRR strategy, can you explain that for those who maybe are new to the show or haven’t heard that word, BRRRR before? How does that work? And maybe giving us example of one of your properties, how it’s worked for you.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, for sure. I’ll actually do the very first one. So the first one, it was a wholesaler that was selling it. I bought it for 45, so that’s the first, the BRRRR the B, buy. I bought it for 45K and I want to say they were asking like 55. Again, throw some numbers out there and you’ll be surprised how many times that’ll work. So I offered 45, they took it. And that house, the next is the R the repair, which that house needed, in my mind or the numbers that I wrote down and that I came up with, it needed like 20,000 of repairs is what I gathered.

Billy Dha Kidd:
But at the end, I want to say, I ended up spending 10 to 15K. And the reason behind that is when I walked in there, I was like, “Okay, this is a great deal. I’m going to ha leave this house brand new,” is what I thought. Well, with my construction company, my guys guided me and they were like, “Why are you putting a brand new LVP flooring on this if we could refinish it?” So I was like, “Okay.” And in my mind, I’m like, “Because I got the budget.” So I did that. I went along with what they told me.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Another thing was the windows, I was going to replace all brand new windows. And they were like, “Hey, these windows work perfectly fine. “One of my guys was like, “Let me show you what I can do.” The next day I came back, he had cleaned it up, re-cocked it, did all this little stuff that honestly, the window looked brand new, threw some paint on it. I was like, “Okay.” So that’s one thing I like to tell people, is just because you have that budget, if you could stretch it out like that, then that’s even more money on the back end.

Brandon Turner:
You know what’s the interesting point? I don’t think we’ve ever talked about it on this show, but talking to other people, like your contractor with ideas, instead of just like, “This is my scope of work, I created it. I am The Lord of the Land today. You have no say.” That’s how, that’s how most real estate investors approach their scopes of work. But I love the idea of talking with your contractors and asking their opinion, “What would you do in this case?” Now, keep in mind, a lot of contractors are just morons and they’re going to do something stupid and They’re going to waste a lot of money, but not always.

Brandon Turner:
And I would say most of the time, they’re good people who are going to give you a good idea. For example, the reason I say that is because sometimes I’d have contractors that would just like paint over every outlet because it’s just faster to paint over the outlet than it is to take the outlet off. There are cases where they will want to save time and money and make more money for themselves. But, we just don’t know what they know. And so, relying on other people, such a great tip, I’m glad you brought that up.

Brandon Turner:
Now, let me ask you about the lending thing. A lot of people do struggle with the BRRRR strategy. Everyone loves it and they want to get in there and they want to buy the property and refinance it, and then, “Oh no, the appraisal doesn’t come in high enough.” That’s one of the biggest fears. I’m wondering if you’ve ever encountered that, and how you make sure that your value at the end of the project before you refinance it, how do you make sure that value is where it needs to be?

Billy Dha Kidd:
And that’s the thing, Brandon, that no matter what you’re doing with the property… Again, I’m a contractor myself, I own a construction company. And what I always tell my clients is this, “You make money when you buy, not when you sell.” And I feel like that’s the biggest issue with the contractor and flippers or investors overall, because when they come and let’s say they do the scope of work and we give them the number, it’s like, “Oh wow, that’s a lot. You’re not a cheap contractor,” for example. And it’s one of those things where it’s like, “Yeah, but you bought wrong.” So I always like to tell people, “Hey, you make money when you buy not when you sell.”

Brandon Turner:
Yeah. That’s a really good point. I’m going to throw this to you as well, David. David, as the author of the BRRR book, how do you deal with things like the appraisal is not high enough or even just any just general tips on lending in this case since you’re also a lender?

David Greene:
The first thing I’ll say is, in Long Distance Investing, I talked about exactly what Billy says. I actually don’t put a lot of confidence in my own ability to design the interior, it’s just not something I’m good at. As Brandon would know, the first thing he ever told me when we met was, “You need to lose weight and dress better.” I’m not good at looking good.

Brandon Turner:
I did not say that.

David Greene:
He always denies it-

Brandon Turner:
You always say that. I’ve never said that.

David Greene:
… but I have the memory of an elephant.

Brandon Turner:
I said I don’t wear pajamas. Don’t wear pajamas, that’s all I said.

David Greene:
That’s a nice way to put up it, but that’s neither here nor there. What I’m saying is, I would go to my contractors and say, “Look, here’s what I would like to do. What would you do differently? Or what colors do you think we should use?” And if they’re like me, you can tell, “I really don’t want to be the one to tell you,” okay, I’m not going to rely on you. But many times they’re like, “Well, all my other clients are doing boom, boom, boom, boom.” “Oh, awesome. I’ve got a whole menu. I could just pick what I like.” And so I think Billy, that’s a great piece of advice you said.

David Greene:
Don’t try to be the person who knows that realm when the contractor works in that space every single fricking day and they know what is… And they also know what’s on sale. They’re like, “Well, if you go that tile, it’s going to cost this much. But Home Depot, I was just there this morning and they have this one for much cheaper.” Now, when it comes to the lending, here’s what I would say. Even though the refinance will repeat as the last step, but refinance is the last practical step in the BRRRR model, that doesn’t mean you address it last. You actually want to start with the end in mind and start there first.

David Greene:
So what I’d tell people is, get pre-approved before you ever even go buy the house with the cash or the hard money loan or whatever you’re going to do. Don’t just hope that when you get to refinance, you can get a loan. If you’re somebody who makes oodles of money and has no problem getting a loan, you can just go to a bank and say like, “What could you do for me?” And oftentimes, banks, if they see that you’re very well qualified, you have a ton of cash in your account, they give you perks.

David Greene:
And I’m saying banks like Wells Fargo, Chase, somewhere. You can just walk right in and get a loan. That’s your best option. If you’re all the rest of us in the world that aren’t in that situation, I say you should go to a broker. Now, what brokers do is they go to all the other banks, and most banks don’t have… I shouldn’t say most, many banks don’t have brick and mortar locations. Like my company, wherever brokerage. So you would come to us and say, “Look, I want to get a loan. What would I have to do?” We would look at your financials and then we would go find the bank for you that does it, and then we’d bring you your options. We’re like, “Look, this bank is offering this rate with these terms. This is what we can do for you.”

David Greene:
And we collect all the documentation the bank’s going to need. And again, just like people thinking that the scope of work is something they’ve got to figure out on the rehab, the lending is not something you should have to go from bank to bank, to bank. Man, I used to do that all the time myself to find the one that would give me the loan. Now, I just go to a broker who has relationships, and not all brokers are the same, some work with two banks, and that’s all they want to deal with. Our brokerage has like 50 or something because our vision is that investors come to us and say, “I need a loan,” and it’s our job to go figure out how they can get it.

David Greene:
So that is the advice I would give there, is, start with that, figure out what type of loan you could get, understand the numbers, and then bake that into what you’re looking for with your deal.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And it goes back to what I said earlier that if that bank tells you no, go to the next one and the next one. Once you find one too, what’s nice about it is now I have relationships with a lot of these bankers, I put a bid actually on a million dollar apartment complex here in Lincoln, I didn’t get it, but just knowing that the banker had my back and he had shown me what the numbers were going to like made me feel better. Like, “Hey, you know what? I can do this in the future for sure.” So it’s that relationship that you build with the lender that’s important.

David Greene:
Very true.

Brandon Turner:
All right. So you’ve got these 22 units now and growing portfolio. How are you managing this whole empire?

Billy Dha Kidd:
At first, it was just me going in there, painting, doing whatever I had to do. Then the showing. So I was a one-man army, but one thing that I have been trying to do best now is treat it like a company. So from there, my wife actually just quit her job during the summer of this year, so she took over the management portion of it. And then with the construction, then I have my crew. In the future, even with that management, she’s already looking at getting her broker’s license.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Here in Nebraska, you need your broker’s license to run a management company for others. So now we’re looking into that. Here in a couple years, hopefully we’ll open up shop for that. So really just all around in the real estate world, if that makes sense, with the construction management and everything else.

Brandon Turner:
You said, “Treat it like a company.” I love that phrase. What does that mean to you? What does that mean to treat your rental property management like a company versus like what most people just do, being a landlord?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah. Really, just basically stepping outside yourself and realizing that this thing is going to go faster if you get the right people around you. And that was the biggest thing for me is realizing, “You know what, I’m over here doing a one-man show.” And honestly at first though, you have to do that. I always tell people, it’s that Mamba Mentality like Kobe, you have to hustle, hustle, hard work. There’s a lot of people that are like, “Oh, let your money work.” But I feel like the working smarter comes after the hard work. You can’t skip that first step. You have to hustle, hustle, work hard, then go to the next step, which is working smarter. And I feel like that’s how you build an empire.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Once you start working smarter, you graduate to that next level, then you could build that big empire from there. So that’s where I’m at now is looking around like, “Okay, I have the right people on my team, now I just need to be focused on growing this thing even further,

David Greene:
Brandon, didn’t you have a good analogy of a plane taken off to describe this, working hard and then transitioning into working smart and leverage?

Brandon Turner:
I have no idea what you’re talking about.

David Greene:
That’s how many brilliant ideas you have that you don’t know. It’s like asking Floyd Mayweather, “Don’t you have a Lamborghini that’s brown?”

Brandon Turner:
I put together a book outline one time called Lift, L-I-F-T. And it was all about… I guess, I do have one, I don’t remember at all what I said.

David Greene:
That’s funny that I know you a lot better than you do.

Brandon Turner:
I know, you know my knowledge better. The idea was, one, building a plane, most planes never take out the ground. You have the right pieces, you have the right velocity, you have right a lot of things. And so when you have all the stuff lined up, lift is not like magic, it’s just the result, it’s just the end result of doing the right processes ahead of time. And in reality, when a planes takes off, it’s almost effortless, it’s easy. It’s just natural love of the world, it lifts because that’s how the world works. And I think when you run a good business, it’s like lift, it’s like you’ve achieved lift because of the things that you set up to do. So I guess that was the idea.

David Greene:
The part that I took from it was in the beginning, like what Billy was saying, it’s massive effort when you’re are on the runway. You’re like, “All systems go, burning a ton of gas.” You feel that, Ugh, you’re in the plane when it’s taken off. And then if you hit hard work, the plane will start to ascend. And when you hit 10,000 feet or whatever planes calls that you kick it into autopilot, it doesn’t take nearly as much work, it’s smooth. And that’s when you’re working harder. Is that Billy what you have felt your business has done you?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah. Exactly, for sure. And then I think shout out to Collin, one of the analogies I got from him, local investor here in Omaha, he said that one of his mentors said, and just to tie everything up how you guys were talking about the end result, and one of the things he spoke about on my podcast was he said, “Hey, my mentor told me to write down my eulogy, basically my funeral speech.” And he’s like, “Work backwards from that.” And that hit me hard. That hit me hard, I was like, “Wow.” So going back to what David was saying with lending, for example, make sure your numbers are already ready to go and then work backwards from that.

Billy Dha Kidd:
So I think in general in life, if you do that, if you look at that speech, I guarantee you, you’re going to take massive action, you’re going to work hard than the normal person that wouldn’t write that speech.

Brandon Turner:
True story, it’s about reading your eulogy or whatever you like, a guy named Alfred Nobel, the guy from the Nobel Prize, he was the, I don’t know even an inventor, but the inventor basically of Dynamite and blowing things up and led to the death of tons of people. Anyway, one time he picked up the newspaper and there was an obituary in there of him, himself, that said, he was called the merchant of death, and it was that he had died. Well, somebody got it wrong, they screwed up and they thought he died. And so they wrote this obituary for him in the newspaper and he read his own obituary and he realized that his legacy was going to be one of being the merchant of death, having killed people.

Brandon Turner:
And so he changed his entire life around, turned it around and started promoting peace, hence the Nobel Prize, which we have today. So just a cool anecdote about when you look at the end of your life, what do you want to be known for and what’s that?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Exactly. And it’s all mindset at the end of the day. Literally I knew that when I was working that job, I wanted freedom. I wanted freedom, that’s the reason why I was hustling, selling CDs. Honestly, I could have quit my job then because I already had numbers and it’s about taking calculated risks too. I already had my numbers worked out and saying, “Okay, if I sell this many CDs every week or every two weeks, if I do this many shows, then that means my bills are paid.” But I still didn’t take my shot yet, I was waiting again with the calculated risks.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Then I start my construction company, I could have also quit then. And then now with the real estate, obviously now putting it all together, all that was worth it, and it’s all mindset. I hear that a lot with you guys with the lawn mowing, for example, the $50 task. Well, that $50 task made me a multimillionaire. And the reason why I say that is because every time I would hit that lawnmower, there was something like the smell, just the hearing the birds. And I had my headphones on listening to a podcast, listening to you guys, listening to any other interviews that were out there, listening to an audio book. And that literally every hour that I did, every week or two or whatever, changed my life and it was all mindset.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And so I always like to say, you could look at it the other way or this way. It’s all mindset, honestly. People say they’re waiting for the economy to change or the real estate market to change in order for them to jump on, and little do they know what needs to change is their philosophy. Their mindset is what needs to change. Nothing else matters once you do that. So change your thinking. And once I changed that thinking everything around me changed. I stopped blaming the government, I stopped crying about taxes or the market. I took responsibility. And the crazy thing about it is that it was these little life concepts, and I call them ABC concepts.

Billy Dha Kidd:
The reason why I call them ABC concepts, because they’re simple, for example, make your bed. I’m sure you guys have heard that book. It’s like, how easy is that? But not many people can do it. And once you start doing those little things or magic of thinking big, miracle morning, the 5:00 AM club, I can go on and on, it’s easier said than done. Many read those, but they don’t follow through, and so that’s why I wrote my book too, was to help inspire people, to motivate them, to take action basically.

David Greene:
I think that’s something Jocko Willink has figured out really, really good, is that life is all about momentum. And he starts his day off by waking up at 4:00 AM. Disclaimer, I don’t wake up at 4:00 AM, I’m not pretending to be Jocko. And he works out. And his theory is that, if I start my day with a workout, I have now built positive momentum. I now want to eat something healthier for breakfast. And now I’m going out of a workout and a good meal starting my work day when my competition is probably in bed or just now getting up or hitting the snooze alarm. So now I’m getting a head still art that I’m jumping ahead.

David Greene:
And now when they finally get to the office, I’ve got a 30% lead. So now I’m even more encouraged to just go for the kill. And he just makes sure if he starts his day off right, he will build momentum throughout the day, which will build momentum throughout life, which will open up all the doors Jocko has. He’s now producing clothing and he’s selling supplements, and his consulting company, I think he charged $100,000 an hour or something like that. I looked into having him speak to my mastermind and it was pretty expensive. He’s got all these great things that are going in his life because of momentum, which is really what you’re talking about, Billy.

David Greene:
It’s hard to just say, “I’m going to go buy 22 units.” It’s much easier to say, “I’m going to start making my bed. And now I’m going to make sure that I planned my day the night before so I know what I’m getting into today.” And as you build that momentum, these tasks that seem very difficult for someone listening right now become easier. To me, that’s what I’m taking out of what you’re saying is, you have absolute control over what you think like you said, you quit blaming people, and the small steps that you take. And if you just get those two things, right, how it typically works out, is everything else lines up for you.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, I totally agree. And I can’t remember what book this was from, but even there was a book that basically said about how this billionaire woke up and he wouldn’t get out of bed until he had a tear of joy of being thankful coming down his cheek. And that hit me hard because at that time… And that’s the thing, I’ve always been thankful for everything. People always say money isn’t everything, but it’s like, it is, when you see the stuff that I’ve seen, you need money. To retire my mom, I want to have money to retire her. And they always say, “Oh, I’d rather be happy riding the bus basically than having money.” And it’s like, “I’ve rode the bus, and I used to ride the bus to school and it wasn’t that happy.”

David Greene:
Not when there’s crime on the bus.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Exactly. Yeah.

David Greene:
And I agree with you. That philosophy is so oversimplified, it’s easy you to say that until your kid gets sick and you need money to help him. And then what happens is they’re going to other people who have been working hard and saying, “Can I have your money?” So I’m not saying don’t ask for help if you need it, but just that philosophy… There’s that old story of the ant that worked all summer and stored food away versus the grasshopper that played all summer and then when winter came, the grasshopper had to go to the ant. I really like what you’re mentioning there.

David Greene:
What I want to ask you, Billy, when it comes to managing the assets that you’ve got, what have you found has been the hardest part you weren’t expecting? Is it managing the rent collection? Is it expenses that you didn’t think were going to pop up? What’s your biggest hurdle or struggle that you’re facing with these 22 units you already own?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I think it’s planning, and not that I didn’t plan, but I think the hardest part of it is how these people get up and leave, and they leave a mess, if that makes sense. And when I was right there and then, it had to be me picking it up and me doing everything. Thank God, now I have the systems in place that take me away from that, but I think that was the hardest part is how these people think that it’s a robot that goes in there and just picks up everything and cleans it up for the next tenant. But also, me being the nice guy that I am, I feel like a lot of people took advantage of that too.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Basically, I learned the hard way that I had to have that business mindset, and I did, but I was too nice. So now having systems in place and policies written down, which is important too, a lot of people think, “Oh, I have it in my head. These are my policies.” And it’s no, you got to write them down type them up. And you’d be surprised how easy that is to send to your lawyer when you need it for an eviction, for example.

Brandon Turner:
Is there anything, Billy, that you would say has been, not just in the management, but just overall, what’s been the biggest challenge to get to where you are today in terms of the 22 units you now have, what’s been the biggest hurdle that you’ve had to overcome?

Billy Dha Kidd:
As far as real estate, I think the biggest hurdle was that, was me thinking that I had more control doing everything myself, and little did I know that things would get done faster when I started bringing people in my team and people that I trusted and get things done, and even better than I can. I would type up a paper and there’s people that can make it look nicer than me and send it out faster than me, as easy as that is, it does take time. So I think just not having those systems in place at the beginning. Mentally, I thought I did, but now looking back, it’s like, “Okay. And if you want to grow this thing to 50 units, then you got to have those systems down and policies in place.”

David Greene:
Brandon, what have you found in your business that how what Billy’s talking about here, where you got to have systems in place and when they were developed, what advice do you have for people that are getting started now and don’t necessarily need a system, but will the future do?

Brandon Turner:
I look at it like, everything that I do, I want to be a quitter. I want to quit and I want to never have to do that job again. And so everything from answering the phones, if I never wanted to answer a phone again, then what would I have to do so I never have to answer a phone again? That’s a system. That’s how I create every system is, if I never had to do this again, but they needed it done perfectly well, what does that look like? So sometimes it’s a checklist or a process or a piece of paper or an online documents, it’s something that just works so I don’t have to do that thing again.

Brandon Turner:
I always say, I don’t always say this, but I’ll say, the systems is a mindset. It’s like a mindset of systems, it’s the way that you think. I think in systems now, I don’t think in actions. So when you start from that and you start making systems about little things like answering the phone or how you’re going to screen tenants, “Oh, the screen tenants, this is what we do. It’s a 10-step checklist, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10.” All of a sudden that becomes a system now that in the future, even if you do it yourself, you’re not going to outsource it yet, you now have a system that you can follow every time and then improve it next time, “Oh, I forgot to ask about job history on this tenant screening. Okay, add that to the system.”

Brandon Turner:
Now, two years later, three years later, when you no longer want to do that, it is really easy shift that over to a virtual assistant or a local assistant, or somebody else to handle it because it’s been refined and perfected by you. And so again, I would just say the best thing with systems is just to start making systems right now to train your mind, to think that way. What about you David?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I was just going to say, I think when you build a business, no matter what type of business it is in a franchise model, I think that’s where you have that handbook. And you could just hand it over and sell it to whoever, and it’s going to be the same thing over and over. So I love that you said that, Brandon.

David Greene:
I think that’d be a great way to look at any business is, how would I franchise this?

Brandon Turner:
What do you mean by that?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Basically, for example, we’re looking at the management company that we’re going to start here with my wife, and our goal as well is for her to lead the office, be in there, but get out of it. And in order for her to do that, we’re going to have to build it like franchise. So what by I mean that is all the systems that we’re going to have in place, ae could start this company anywhere in the world after Lincoln, Nebraska, we could go to California, Texas and follow the same procedure, kind of like Burger King or all these other companies, they just pop up out of nowhere.

Brandon Turner:
There’s a really good book out there, it’s called Built to Sell by a guy named John Warrillow very much on this mindset, this thought. The idea of the book is how to sell your business, but what I loved about it was more how to create a business that is sellable. And that’s more important. In other words, how to create a franchisable type business, which any business of the world could be, that you can get out of, you can stay into, it just makes it easier. Anyway, just book recrimination for everyone, Built to Sell by a guy named John Warrillow, really good. Anyway, David, what you were going to say on that?

David Greene:
What I was saying is if you disciplined yourself to consider that any endeavor you take on, you’re going to have to franchise, it would really, really tighten up the way that you do run your business. There’s always in my head what I experience in life is there’s this struggle between it’s faster if I do it myself and it’s better if I get someone else to do it, and it takes discipline to build a system that somebody else can execute. And that’s why very few of us do it. But as you become successful, which is the goal like what Billy’s learning now that he has 22 units, I’m sure, is the fast way I’ll go do it myself, leaves you spending 16 hours a day running as fast as you can to do everything, and then you hate what you earned.

David Greene:
So you’ve accomplished your goal, you’re like, “Finally,” and then you wish you wouldn’t have had it. It’s that Wolf by the Ears thing, I can’t let it go, because it’s going to bite me, but I also I’m safe if I just keep doing it myself.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And to add onto that, I think it reminded me of the question too that you guys asked me of what has been the hardest part, it’s also changing that mindset because where I’m coming from, we had to do what we had to do. So that mindset is huge. You have to really evaluate yourself once you hit a certain level and say, “Okay. I can’t worry about coupons at Burger King anymore like I used to back then, now I can afford whatever, if you want to Triple Whopper, or whatever you want.” And so it is shifting that mindset. And so I just wanted to add on to that awesome

Brandon Turner:
Awesome, man. Well, this has been phenomenal, we’re not quite done yet. I want to shift to the next segment of the show, but before I do, I’m just curious, where do you see yourself headed in the future? What do you want your portfolio look like, growing your business look like, what kind of real estate you’re going to buy, where are you headed?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I definitely want to look into syndication in the future, that’s definitely something that the more I learn, again, it’s mindset and it’s being thankful where you’re at. I’m very happy where I’m at, and what I’ve noticed is that everything I’ve wanted has happened so far, if that makes sense. So now that I’m looking at doing syndication, maybe somebody who reads my book or listens to this podcast or my podcast or whatever, they might bring me a deal. I’ve learned that the law of attraction honestly, has worked a lot in my life. That’s how I have my Benz now, and that’s how I have my house now. It’s a new built home and it wasn’t me… Obviously, it started from working hard, but like I said, I graduated to working smarter.

Billy Dha Kidd:
And then now I’m writing new goals down. Writing goals is super important. Actually, what I do is I have an iPhone and on that iPhone, something maybe this helps somebody out there, that’s the first thing I see in the morning. And obviously, you’ve heard the opposite. But the reason why that’s the first thing I look at in the morning is my screen is basically my goals. So as soon as I wake up, I read my goals to myself, from finances to family, to faith. So I have it all written down. And that’s the first thing I see in the morning, and then at night. And again, I’m big on working on yourself.

Billy Dha Kidd:
There’s days, we’re human, there’s days where I don’t hit my run, man, I feel it. That week, mentally, it’s crazy for me. So if you do everything mentally, I think the world will bring whatever you want to the table. And so that’s where I’m heading next is I want some units, but honestly, otherwise if I just hit 100 doors, single family and duplexes, I’ll definitely be happy too.

David Greene:
I’ll add one caveat to what, or maybe not caveat, but I’ll add an extension of that philosophy that Billy just said. Here’s why I think that’s the smartest thing anyone listening can do. Most of us look at life from a narcissistic perspective, what do I want and how do I get it? And so we look for an opportunity and we try to say where is the thing I want? How do I go take it? The way the world works though, is nobody cares what you want, they care what they want. All of us are narcissists in that way.

David Greene:
And so what happens is we have a thing we want and we go out there and say, “How do I find a person, a system, a software, a something that will help me get what I want?” The wise people are the ones that say, “I’m going to figure out how to make myself what other people would want and be the answer for them.” And then the world just comes to you. Everyone comes and says, “Billy, show me how to do this thing. Can you buy this deal? This person needs to sell their house.” Whatever it is that you’ve made yourself good at the world will bring it to your doorstep.

David Greene:
But it’s not this esoteric, weird, the secret type thing going on, it actually makes a lot of sense, it’s that everybody looks at the world and says, “How do I get what I want?” And if you’re the person that’s good at giving people what they want, it will come to you. And that’s why so important that we have systems, because the more things we have in place to manage what we’ve already accumulated, the more of ourselves we have free to go and accumulate more. Anything you want to change about that, Brandon, or add on?

Brandon Turner:
No, I think that’s pretty solid, man. I think that’s really good. I just want to shift over and head to the Deal Deep Dive. All right. We’re going to dive Deal Deep Dive today with Billy Dha Kidd. All those Ds, the alliteration are coming back.

David Greene:
I see what you did there.

Brandon Turner:
Thank you. We already started, I think-

David Greene:
Don’t mention it.

Brandon Turner:
That was what I was looking for. We started up earlier, I believe, with the deal I asked you about earlier, but let’s continue that. Number one, in the deal that you have, what property is this and where was it located?

Billy Dha Kidd:
This one was a single family home in Lincoln, Nebraska, and like I said, I got it from a wholesaler for 45,000. And I think earlier what I was mentioning was my budget was 20 grand. Well, after shortening up everything, now that we’ve refinished the floor instead of putting LVP or fixing the windows, instead of putting brand new windows, I want to say I cut that in half 10, 12,000 instead. And so once I got that place rented, I actually ended up refinancing it for $10,000 more than what it was. So now I took that money and repeated it.

David Greene:
You might have just covered the whole deep dive in one statement there.

Brandon Turner:
That’s awesome. Oh, anything particular you did for negotiation to get that deal?

Billy Dha Kidd:
It was the 55K is what they were asking. So really just talking, man, communication. That’s key, just talk to these people. They’re humans and they want to sell as bad as you want to buy.

Brandon Turner:
I love that you said that, they want to sell as bad as you want to buy. Sometimes we think of a real estate transaction as us against them, and there’s this anger against the two sides, but we all have the same goal. They didn’t list the house for sale because they wanted to keep it, it’s because they want to get rid of it. So if you can solve their problem, make it easy for them, yeah. What about lessons? What did you learn from this deal overall?

Billy Dha Kidd:
The main lesson was not overspending more than what you have to for sure, but also, I think just being the first BRRRR that I did, the whole process itself was just lovely. And I validated that David Greene was right at that point, so it felt nice getting that money back. And like I said, repeating it right after.

David Greene:
Why don’t you start a hashtag of that, Billy? I love that, David Greene, I’m sure David Greene was right.

Billy Dha Kidd:
I’ll do that.

Brandon Turner:
You bring up a good point though, and that is sometimes you just have to validate this theories, these things you hear on the podcast, you have to just go out and get it done before you really internalize it and be like, “Okay. Yeah, it does work. I’m going to make my life about there. I’m going to do a bunch of stuff.” Which is why David and I are always encouraging people, get that first deal. It doesn’t have to be a home run, don’t lose money, but it doesn’t have to be a home run. Get in the game, validate that, “Yes, this does work, I am making money now. Now I’m going to figure out how to make it better.”

Brandon Turner:
And so don’t overthink this stuff, everyone listening, just get out there, find some good properties and you can do exactly what Billy here did, build up a good portfolio and have a cool business, quit your job.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, I totally agree. And I’m glad that you brought that home run because it’s one of those things where people think that you have to do this massive thing in order for you to get financial freedom. And it’s really not. 22 doors, if you think about it, is not a lot, but because I bought them right is why it is a lot. So again, just make sure you guys buy right at the beginning, that’s where you make your money.

Brandon Turner:
Awesome, man. Well, with that said, that’s the end of the Deal Deep Dive. Why don’t we head over to the-

Speaker 4:
Famous four.

Brandon Turner:
All right. These are the same four questions we ask every guest every week. So Billy, number one, do you have a current favorite real estate related book or all-time favorite real estate related book?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I’ll go with all-time favorite, you can’t go wrong with Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Definitely again, ABC Concept, once you hear it, it’s like, “Oh my God, I’ve been thinking of this, but now he put words into it.” And I’ll do a shout to you, Brandon, because I also did the audio version of the property management book that you did with your wife, that’s a great book. Honestly, one of the things, well, one of the many things, it’s not I just picked one thing out of the whole book. One of the many things that we do with me and the wife, we go out for dinner after the whole BRRRR process is over with and it’s rented, refinanced, and that dinner tastes so much better than any regular dinner. So try that.

Brandon Turner:
I love it. I love it, man. All right. Next question.

David Greene:
What is your favorite business book?

Billy Dha Kidd:
For that one, I’ll say Think and Grow Rich. I don’t know if it’s a business book or not, but that book just changed my life, not just my business, but my life in general. So Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

David Greene:
I was thinking that books like that, and we mentioned one in the favorite books that Brandon and I have, The Richest Man in Babylon, that word rich got thrown around a lot back when those books were written. But nowadays, rich has a different connotation and I think we prefer the word wealth now. And I’m sure in for 50 years, wealth will be looked at negatively. It’s just an important to look past the gut feeling you get when you hear something and try to understand what is the point that the person’s trying to make, because that book Think and Grow Rich, I’ve heard so many massively, like the Tony Robbins level success in the world, all come back to saying how much that book affected them. So you’re in some good company.

Billy Dha Kidd:
I agree. And I actually, that’s one of the books that every January, I start my new year with listening to that book. So I listen to it once a year for sure. And every year, there’s something I pick up too.

David Greene:
All right. When you’re not buying units in Nebraska, what are some of your hobbies? Are you still making music?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Yeah, for sure. And that’s what I was going to say, once you get to this level where you just enjoy what you do, because I do from the construction to now writing my book, my music, honestly, I don’t even consider anything hobbies, I just do what I do. And if there is a hobby making that money, I think that’s a good hobby to have, right?

Brandon Turner:
Yeah. There you go. Awesome, man. Well, last question for me. What do you think separates successful real estate investors from those who give up, fail, or never get started?

Billy Dha Kidd:
I think action. That’s the main thing, action. These people that don’t do anything is because of that action. The Power of Being Uncomfortable, again, that’s the title of my book, and in that book, I talk about that, that it’s all about action. And it doesn’t have to be massive action, like we said, any little action that you do. And once you do it, the crazy thing is I used to be scared of that first house, or the first BRRRR, or whatever, and even now, I was scared of doing the podcast. There’s always that fear factor that you have, but once you do it, the crazy thing is after you do it, you look back and you’re like, “Wow, I could do it again and again, and again.”

Billy Dha Kidd:
And that’s the magic of that is, let go of that fear and just do it, and I guarantee you that you’re going to look back and say, “Oh, wow, I should have done this sooner.” A lot of the guests that we have on our podcast, we ask them, what’s the one thing that they regret, and is that, that they should have done it sooner.

Brandon Turner:
That’s so good, man. So good. Well, with that said, I think it’s time to get out of here. I guess, David, you got your final question and then we’ll close up shop.

David Greene:
Last question of the day, where can people find out more about you?

Billy Dha Kidd:
Billydhakidd.com, and it’s Dha, D-H-A-K-I-D-D.com. If you leave me your email, I’ll stay in contact with you. Instagram, @billydhakidd, and then you YouTube, and The Minority Report Podcast also, anywhere podcasts are available. So hit me up, I’m on Instagram, I’ll definitely write back if you write me.

David Greene:
Okay. Awesome.

Brandon Turner:
Love it. Well, David, you want to get us out of here?

David Greene:
Brandon, any last words?

Brandon Turner:
No, that’s all I got.

David Greene:
All right. This is David Greene for Brandon “So Good” Turner signing off. Your beard is so perfect, it looks like a black chin strap.

Billy Dha Kidd:
Mine or Brandon’s?

Brandon Turner:
Are you talking about Billy’s or mine?

David Greene:
Yours, Billy. No, Brandon doesn’t look like a chin strap, Brandon looks like a bird nest.

Brandon Turner:
Just to say, I’ve never been complimented from you all my beard, but Billy, nice beard.

David Greene:
None of us can hit that level of brilliance, man. Brandon’s beard is the David’s Michelangelo. It should have its own podcast and you should make an Instagram page for your beard. Literally you have BeardyBrandon and you have BrandonBeardy or something, BrandonBeardy.

Brandon Turner:
I’ll do that.

David Greene:
Just take a picture with your camera where you just get the beard at the beach, and then have a post from your beard like, “Needed some downtime today from propping Brandon up for so long. Showing the way”-

Billy Dha Kidd:
Different styles for different areas?

David Greene:
Nothing like getting some salt in my hair at the beach.

 

 

Watch the Episode Here

Help Us Out!

Help us reach new listeners on iTunes by leaving us a rating and review! It takes just 30 seconds and instructions can be found here. Thanks! We really appreciate it!

In This Episode We Cover:

  • Building wealth even if you started with a disadvantage
  • Developing sales skills and using them when buying and selling properties
  • Generational wealth and why it means more than just getting rich
  • Finding deals both on and off-market for the BRRRR strategy
  • The biggest hurdles that come with owning a large rental portfolio 
  • Creating a sellable, scalable business so you work less and make more
  • And So Much More!

Links from the Show

Books Mentioned in this Show:

Connect with Billy Dha Kidd: