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Logan M.
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  • Provo, UT
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Buy or Rent a Sewer Scope?

Logan M.
Pro Member
  • Investor
  • Provo, UT
Posted Apr 19 2024, 14:20

I have been having a few recurring issues in different rentals and I have been debating on buying my own sewer scope. I want a better idea of what is going on and it seems handy to have.

Does anyone out there have a sewer scope that they are happy they purchased vs rented?

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Nathan Faselt
Property Manager
  • Rental Property Investor
  • Iowa City, IA
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Nathan Faselt
Property Manager
  • Rental Property Investor
  • Iowa City, IA
Replied Apr 19 2024, 15:41

@Logan M.

Depending on your scale of units and issues

I would say buy a drain auger 1st if you don’t have one and that seems to fix a mass majority of our issues roots, grease, dipers, ect

Now you or a tech would need to learn to use the Machine, they can be dangerous but for us maybe about 2-5 % warrant needing a cam for deeper investigation.

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Replied Apr 20 2024, 07:45

Logan you seem like a great guy and real go getter.  But as you journey through life building a family, starting a business and acquiring wealth it is ok to have a list of things that you should not have to do and it is ok to pay someone else to do it.  Beyond the fact you need to know how to use it, know what you are looking at and and then have to clean it... it is ok to just punt that task to a professional.   If you have a problem pending... a camara won't mitigate your issue and a professional will want to scope it themselves anyway.  

And yes... I have used one for irrigation and water lines.   I am not a pro so not as handy as one would think.

Fun times!
Rog


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Logan M.
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Logan M.
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Replied Apr 22 2024, 08:28
Quote from @Nathan Faselt:

@Logan M.

Depending on your scale of units and issues

I would say buy a drain auger 1st if you don’t have one and that seems to fix a mass majority of our issues roots, grease, dipers, ect

Now you or a tech would need to learn to use the Machine, they can be dangerous but for us maybe about 2-5 % warrant needing a cam for deeper investigation.

 Great advice, thanks @Nathan Faselt

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Logan M.
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Logan M.
Pro Member
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  • Provo, UT
Replied Apr 22 2024, 08:30
Quote from @Roger D Jones:

Logan you seem like a great guy and real go getter.  But as you journey through life building a family, starting a business and acquiring wealth it is ok to have a list of things that you should not have to do and it is ok to pay someone else to do it.  Beyond the fact you need to know how to use it, know what you are looking at and and then have to clean it... it is ok to just punt that task to a professional.   If you have a problem pending... a camara won't mitigate your issue and a professional will want to scope it themselves anyway.  

And yes... I have used one for irrigation and water lines.   I am not a pro so not as handy as one would think.

Fun times!
Rog



 Your advice is always refreshing. I have a handyman do a lot of my work but sometimes I don't feel like that actually fixes the real problem and anytime digging is involved people want to charge a fortune. With that said, it doesn't me it can't be something that the right person wouldn't be able to take care of.

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Jonathan Bock
Tax & Financial Services
  • Financial Advisor
  • Bryn Mawr, PA
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Jonathan Bock
Tax & Financial Services
  • Financial Advisor
  • Bryn Mawr, PA
Replied Apr 22 2024, 08:57

@Logan M.

Check out pricing on Spartan's site really depends on your scale if you bring this in house; how much are you paying your current drain cleaner annually versus having your staff do this?  

https://spartantool.com/shop-products/

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Alecia Loveless
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#4 BRRRR - Buy, Rehab, Rent, Refinance, Repeat Contributor
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Alecia Loveless
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#4 BRRRR - Buy, Rehab, Rent, Refinance, Repeat Contributor
Replied Apr 22 2024, 17:27

@Logan M. Some things it’s just best to hire a professional for.

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Logan M.
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Logan M.
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Replied Apr 23 2024, 07:43
Quote from @Alecia Loveless:

@Logan M. Some things it’s just best to hire a professional for.


 Agreed!

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Ed O.
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  • Statewide, MO
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Ed O.
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Replied Apr 29 2024, 19:04

@Logan M.

One of the easiest checks to write is for drain auguring and sewer clearing. I'm fortunate to have a great, skilled outfit that handles those things for me. 

Early on in my career, I remember other investors speaking of the quick breakeven for a sewer snake. 

I asked a plumber at the time that was working for me, why don't you cable lines. He looked at me, stone cold and said, "with the herpes, hiv and god knows what else is in that sewer line, those other guys, for $65, they can have that money." 

I say this as no disrespect to the people in the trades - their jobs can be tough... only as a note to the risks of doing such work.