Six days before leasing signing, ceiling caves in!

122 Replies

Originally posted by @Waylon Zook :

@Jim K. Did you forget that you are supposed to find a handyman and pay him [email protected] and call in order to home depot and pay with your credit card? Always buy materials and never pay anything upfront!

Dont forget to ***** that it took 3 days longer than estimated and when you get down on the floor and look at the texture the new does not perfectly match the old.

Oh and buy him a $9 burger and fries for lunch.

12 o'clock and the forum post of the day goes to.Waylon. I suspect 5% of the BP crowd reading your post understand what's between the lines, but I laughed my *** off. Thank you.

"It's called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it."

George Carlin

Nothing some nails, sheetrock, tape and textured paint couldn't fix. We often fix things ourselves on our own rentals. Major things we hire out and we have good relationships with plumbers, electricians, etc.  We had to turn over a 1200 sq. ft. unit this weekend so we could fill for Monday. A painted want nearly 1800 to paint. I did it in about 4 hours, 2 coats and then tenant loves the unit. 

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

Picture it...Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, home of old houses with serious problems and the people who live in them. At the end of October, the bathroom sink upstairs springs a leak. The leak flows across the tile floor and into the crack between the hall and the bathroom. It slowly soaks all the joists and the heavily-textured plaster ceiling downstairs. The house is empty, waiting for the tenants to move in on the first of November.

Oh Rhett, Rhett, whatever shall I do? Wherever shall I go? The tenants are scheduled to move in, their lease is up at their old place, where are they supposed to stay? Where am I supposed to find people to fix this quickly? WHAT SHOULD I DO???

Seriously, I'm extremely curious what those of who don't do any of the work in your own places do in this situation and under this time pressure. I know that you all believe your time is too valuable for this. "Work on your business, not in your business"...so what's your solution? Find a handyman willing to do this repair and pay him whatever he wants to get it done chop-chop? Call up your regular plaster repair contractor? How much money are you willing to pay to fix a hole in a dining room ceiling of this size? How much of a hit is your war chest going to take?

I feel for you. Been there plenty of times. Think logically and non-emotionally before doing anything. Hard to do, I know, but it helps a lot; at least for me it does.

@Mike Adams Love it. A little DIY, some elbow grease, and a lot of networking.

I do alot of my own work as well... more so in the beginning. I have purposefully transitioned to contracting out as the number of units grow and they are long distance. I think it is in every investors best interest to experience this early in their journey. Training and experience will help to minimize overreaction when faced with unexpected road blocks. There is NOTHING impossible to solve in these types of scenarios.

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

Where am I supposed to find people to fix this quickly?

This is a trick question. You should have people that you can count on for emergency repairs.

Let me tell you a dirty trick I learned during these years in REI, from the contractors I have hired. The first time I saw it, I caught those guys by surprised showing onsite, based from the scope of work that I gave them the drywall was supposed to come down, it was supposed to be a gut job.

Liquid nail and screw the drywall over the existing ceiling, a fresh paint and call it the day. 

Good luck.

You knew about this yesterday, Nov 1 is move in day.  Have a weekend in between with Halloween as well.  I might not be the person you are asking this question to but I simply get one of our crews to handle it.  1-2 Day job.  

@Jim K. you must understand that you are a unicorn right?  If no one has told you this, sorry to break it to you, but you are a unicorn.  Now, I have never met you, never had a conversation with you but from your postings here you are indeed a unicorn.  

Your say you are a handyman but you are very knowledgeable about a lot of aspects of real estate investing, including handyman stuff (renovations).  That said, I am sorry to report to you that not everyone has your skillset.  For example me.  I am a licensed builder in MI but I could in no way handle this project myself.  If I was forced to deal with this alone it would cost me far more time and money to get this done right then it does to call my crew.  

This is why I encourage other investors (in fact, just today in another thread) to be nice to their contractors and go to the site and meet them if they only have a 1 or 2 homes etc....build up a relationship because when you need them, you need them.  

You, of course, don't know this because you are a unicorn and simply jump in and handle it.

But for us mere mortals, or simply for those who chose to concentrate on another side of their business VS doing maintenance and turns even if they have the skill, no need to shame them (me included).  

I applaud you for jumping in and getting that work done.  As someone w/o that skill set I find if amazing.  Well done!.  But for those who view their business different and would rather have their contractors handle it so they can deal with other parts of their business, that is great too.  All different.  

I know I wish I wash handy around the house but understand my shortcomings.  Won't play in the NBA nor fix holes in ceilings.  

For you, well done, I look forward to the finish photos!

@Jim K. finally your insane instance to not do RE the right way has come home to roost. Hoisted by your own petard!

You have walked a razors edge every day that you put off having your Core 4 in place and now you have suffered the consequences. If you had just listened to David this whole unfortunate situation could have been avoided. He is a podcast host you know. 

If you had your go-to agent they would be able to sell that house to the tenants and get you into a new one.  

The PM would have seen this go wrong, probably the night before the renters moved in, but they still would have called you and asked what to do. 

The contractor would work with the PM, while both billed you for their time. 

The lender would help you get a HELOC on your house to pay for repairs and then maybe leverage that into some sort of velocity of money situation.

ohh wait... I've just found out it isn't the Core 4 anymore, it is the 20 Must Have Team Members 

F*@k I don't have the time or energy to keep this going any longer. That sucks. At least it isn't a smooth finish...

@Jim K.

I’ll be right down to give you a hand, I think Pittsburgh is only 6 hours from Easton.

There’s a guy on here that once criticized me for doing my own work, despite the fact that I’m a contractor. I won’t name names..

I applaud you for doing your own work, as I do and always will until I can’t. No one cares about your own properties more than you. And it makes me laugh when I get homeowners and investors alike that would rather make a call and spend $100 to have a $4 toilet flapper replaced than figure it out themselves. I’m glad I’m here to teach my kids this stuff. School is teaching them all kinds of stuff they will never need to know.

Kudos to you sir Jimmy K!

@Jim K. I just had the same thing happen, although not before the tenants moved in. It was an AC overflow issue in a bedroom. Cost a few hundred to dry out and $1500 for the ceiling (removed popcorn in the whole bedroom). I thought it was a roof leak at first so I was happy with a minor AC issue.

Hopefully you can get it done before they get in there.

@Jim K.

I recently just moved out of field work and strictly in the office now. I also moved across the country from NJ to AZ and still run my NJ projects. It was a tough transition since my go to was to just fix it myself but now I have people

To handle issues like this. I had a similar issue but not as bad. A shower was leaking and you could see the wet spot on drywall below. So I sent a handyman over to fix it.

I have Contractora and handyman whom I can call and backups if they aren’t available. I make collecting contacts and never ending process.

It Seems like you enjoy doing the work snd want it done right which is perfectly fine. But for me I had to make it my full time job finding contractors for a couple of weeks. Interviewing, trying out, checking out work sites before I found a couple good guys. Not sure about Pittsburg but in jersey I may have paid $350 for that drywall repair with one of my

Handyman. And it would Have taken him 2-3 days snd not full days either. He could have used quick set mud or a blow dryer or heater for mud to set up quicker.

You enjoy doing the work so that’s what

You plan to do. For me I don’t want to so I make sure I have people available to handles issues th at may arise. WorT case scenario I’ll take guys off one of my active projects and tell them to spend a day or two fixing that. It’s all about the team. The more and better members on the one has to better off they will be.

I also tried a new guy on that leak I spoke about and had to move on with someone else. He didn’t work out plus tries to charge me an arm and a leg. So for me it’s trial and error and just spending time on the phone.

But it’s def possible to work on your business and take care of issues quicker then I could myself working in my business!!

Originally posted by @Mike Adams :

Nothing some nails, sheetrock, tape and textured paint couldn't fix. We often fix things ourselves on our own rentals. Major things we hire out and we have good relationships with plumbers, electricians, etc.  We had to turn over a 1200 sq. ft. unit this weekend so we could fill for Monday. A painted want nearly 1800 to paint. I did it in about 4 hours, 2 coats and then tenant loves the unit. 

Mike...do you really nail your sheetrock in? And how does this story about painting the 1200 ft unit that you knocked out in four hours work? So that's laying out floor protection, doing trim, doing ceilings and wall (2 coats), and cleanup in 4 hours? Smell a lot like the fish that got away...

Originally posted by @Wes Barnes :

@Jim K.

Can I ask you what Insurance company you are with?

I would make a claim with my insurance, let them pay for it.

American Modern. And you would screw over the incoming tenant?

Originally posted by @Andi Ndini :

Let me tell you a dirty trick I learned during these years in REI, from the contractors I have hired. The first time I saw it, I caught those guys by surprised showing onsite, based from the scope of work that I gave them the drywall was supposed to come down, it was supposed to be a gut job.

Liquid nail and screw the drywall over the existing ceiling, a fresh paint and call it the day. 

Good luck.

No tape, no corners, no mudding?

Originally posted by @Bruce Woodruff :

I wonder if @Jim K. is doing another one his 'let's discuss this' threads...? Which are quite enjoyable by the way.....

What is a core 4?

Bruce, your Core 4 team is a concept that David Greene, co-host of the main Bigger Pockets podcast, believes in. 1. Deal-finder (usually an agent), 2. Property Manager, 3. Contractor, 4. Money man (usually a mortgage broker).

No, this is a real-world problem that I'm seeing a lot of oversimplified solutions to that would lose a lot of people a lot of money.

Originally posted by @Scott M. :

You knew about this yesterday, Nov 1 is move in day.  Have a weekend in between with Halloween as well.  I might not be the person you are asking this question to but I simply get one of our crews to handle it.  1-2 Day job.  

@Jim K.you must understand that you are a unicorn right?  If no one has told you this, sorry to break it to you, but you are a unicorn.  Now, I have never met you, never had a conversation with you but from your postings here you are indeed a unicorn.  

Your say you are a handyman but you are very knowledgeable about a lot of aspects of real estate investing, including handyman stuff (renovations).  That said, I am sorry to report to you that not everyone has your skillset.  For example me.  I am a licensed builder in MI but I could in no way handle this project myself.  If I was forced to deal with this alone it would cost me far more time and money to get this done right then it does to call my crew.  

This is why I encourage other investors (in fact, just today in another thread) to be nice to their contractors and go to the site and meet them if they only have a 1 or 2 homes etc....build up a relationship because when you need them, you need them.  

You, of course, don't know this because you are a unicorn and simply jump in and handle it.

But for us mere mortals, or simply for those who chose to concentrate on another side of their business VS doing maintenance and turns even if they have the skill, no need to shame them (me included).  

I applaud you for jumping in and getting that work done.  As someone w/o that skill set I find if amazing.  Well done!.  But for those who view their business different and would rather have their contractors handle it so they can deal with other parts of their business, that is great too.  All different.  

I know I wish I wash handy around the house but understand my shortcomings.  Won't play in the NBA nor fix holes in ceilings.  

For you, well done, I look forward to the finish photos!

Just for you, Scott, this is where we're at as of 7 pm Wednesday: Drywall prefill with hot mud, seams taped and mudded first coat. I'm using Strait Flex for the wall-to-ceiling edges, six-inch wall fabric and plaster washers for plaster-to-drywall.