Skip to content
Rehabbing & House Flipping

User Stats

430
Posts
170
Votes
Joseph Weisenbloom
  • Investor
  • Austin, TX
170
Votes |
430
Posts

Anyone use only minisplits to cool/heat an entire house?

Joseph Weisenbloom
  • Investor
  • Austin, TX
Posted Feb 6 2024, 08:06

I have a flip I am currently working on and there is no space for ducts. I am considering buying a few multizone minisplits and placing the heads in the bedrooms, kitchen and the living room.

My question is will this strategy work? How do I circulate conditioned air to hallways, bathrooms etc? 

User Stats

167
Posts
101
Votes
KC Pake
Lender
Pro Member
  • Investor
  • Orange Park, FL
101
Votes |
167
Posts
KC Pake
Lender
Pro Member
  • Investor
  • Orange Park, FL
Replied Feb 6 2024, 09:04
Quote from @Joseph Weisenbloom:

I have a flip I am currently working on and there is no space for ducts. I am considering buying a few multizone minisplits and placing the heads in the bedrooms, kitchen and the living room.

My question is will this strategy work? How do I circulate conditioned air to hallways, bathrooms etc? 

Hi Joseph,

I have used this strategy in a large basement (1100 sqft) with multiple rooms. Opting for multi-zone mini-split systems (link is just a sample, there are many to choose from) offers a practical and efficient solution for heating and cooling an entire house, particularly in renovation projects where space for ductwork is constrained or entirely absent. These systems provide the flexibility to install individual air handlers in key living spaces—such as bedrooms, kitchens, and living rooms—without extensive ducting, making them ideal for streamlined and efficient climate control throughout the property. One of the primary benefits of mini-splits is their energy efficiency; by enabling individualized temperature control for different zones within the house, they significantly reduce energy waste associated with heating or cooling unoccupied spaces.

However, a common concern with this approach is ensuring that areas not directly served by an air handler, such as hallways and bathrooms, also receive adequate conditioned air. This can be effectively addressed by strategically placing the mini-split units in locations where they can facilitate airflow into adjacent spaces, and by implementing simple modifications like undercutting doors to promote air circulation. Additionally, the use of ceiling fans in these areas can further assist in distributing conditioned air more evenly throughout the house.

It's also important to conduct accurate load calculations for each zone to ensure that the mini-split units are appropriately sized, thereby maximizing their efficiency and the overall comfort level within the home. Consulting with HVAC professionals experienced in working with mini-splits can provide valuable insights into optimal unit placement, sizing, and strategies for enhancing airflow to areas without direct air handler placement.

With careful planning and installation of multi-zone mini-split systems, renovators can achieve a comfortable, energy-efficient environment that appeals to potential buyers, overcoming the challenges of limited space for traditional ductwork and enhancing the property's value through the added benefit of zoned climate control.

Good luck with your project,
KC

User Stats

12
Posts
6
Votes
Jerry C.
  • Lender
  • Charlotte, NC
6
Votes |
12
Posts
Jerry C.
  • Lender
  • Charlotte, NC
Replied Feb 6 2024, 09:31

I installed a cassette style mini split on a ~600sqft project of mine. Works well. The heating and cooling is definitely not as balanced as a ducted system, but it's good enough.

I've also lived in apartments in the north east with a wall unit in the bedroom and one in the living room. We'd use the living room all the time, but only the bedroom at night. The bedroom was hotter/cooler during the day, but wasn't an issue since we weren't in there. I think the size of the home will really determine if it's worth it or not. 

Vacasa logo
Vacasa
|
Sponsored
We do the work. You get the ROI. We do it all for your vacation rental. All—marketing, pricing, guest requests, housekeeping & more.

User Stats

1
Posts
0
Votes
Replied Feb 6 2024, 13:37

i have a basement where i used cassette mini split which throws air in all 4 directions as its a long 20ftX40ft space. 

in the other adjacent room i placed a wall mounted split. both of them have one condenser unit outside with a heat pump. 

its easy to maintain but its double the cost of the typical HVAC unit. for me a typical 1.5 ton unit costs around 6k unit and duct and labor. but with the ceiling mounted 4 way and wall mounted one way Mitsubishi costed me around 12k. The mini splits have less to no maintenance. 
Mitsubishi told not to touch the outside unit unless its really wrong else the calibration will go wrong and have to spend lot of time to tuen up. so the tuneup people only come to clean the filter and go. 
you need to maintain and show records to get warranty from the manuf.