Job title - fact or fiction

15 Replies

What's in a title? It's all about presentation.

 I mean, at 16 I was "VP of International Marketing" for my dad's small business. Reality - I printed and stuffed and sealed envelopes for his direct mailing campaigns and some of the addresses were in Canada, and my younger brothers were my "team". But we got a good chuckle out of the inflated title.

If you invest in Real Estate "on the side" and also work a full time job, do you list your real estate endeavors on things like Linkedin, Facebook, etc?  Have you gotten yourself business cards to give out at networking events? What title do you give yourself? Owner? President? CEO? VP of acquisitions? 

If you're doing this full time now and are all organized and stuff how did you start out presenting yourself professionally in this arena?  

Thanks!

Jennifer,

This issue is common in just about every sales team for companies large and small. Some people like to think they are dealing with an 'executive' or decision maker and if it helps close the sale / deal, so be it. You want a title, make one up. It has nothing to do with your scope of authority / decision making / compensation / etc.

When you are 16, the title is silly but fun and pretty much everyone sees through it. Giving yourself the title of  CEO / President when you are older but only a 1 man operation is also common and pretty much ignored.

One person I know that is a in their 40's and is a one man shop gave himself the title of 'Director of Acquisitions' . Sounds important enough that they have decision making authority while not unreasonable for a person that age.

Oren

When I just had my first few I just listed my LLC and said "Owner"

Now have no day job and am a one man operation (if you can even call it an operation), but I have a lot of LLC's so I just say "Real Estate Investor"

I think the word investor gets tossed around here a lot more than it should. Plenty of people that seem to think they're investors after reading a book or two. Wholesaler is another popular title.... when it seems like by the questions that get asked they're not very proficient in their trade....

Originally posted by @Matt K. :

I think the word investor gets tossed around here a lot more than it should. Plenty of people that seem to think they're investors after reading a book or two. Wholesaler is another popular title.... when it seems like by the questions that get asked they're not very proficient in their trade....

LOL at people calling themselves investor for reading a book. 

EXPOUNDING: Words don't matter, actions do. No one cares what you say, they care what you do. Titles don't matter, what you've done matters. 

Title's are largely overrated, and partly because of so many are inflated like you mentioned.

Everyone wants to be a CEO or Founder or some nonsense and yet maybe they have done one deal. It's the same as why so many people like to "play business owner" and spend weeks worrying about the name of their LLC before they make any profit.

I say get a business card with your name or company name and no title.

I agree with you that a title (on a business card, not necessarily inside the operation of a business) is just presentation and ultimately just fluff.

I am a partner in a CPA firm (with several other partners), and none of us list a title on our business cards.  I understand that a flashy title can get someone's attention and there is value to that, but I think substance is what is far more important.

I think the same holds true for investors.  If you are out and networking, ultimately all that anyone will care about is your substance (your track record, your business plan, your knowledge in the field).  A bank or private lender won't give you money just because your business card says "CEO".

Originally posted by @Alexander Felice :

Title's are largely overrated, and partly because of so many are inflated like you mentioned.

Everyone wants to be a CEO or Founder or some nonsense and yet maybe they have done one deal. It's the same as why so many people like to "play business owner" and spend weeks worrying about the name of their LLC before they make any profit.

I say get a business card with your name or company name and no title.

 It's also common in some jobs to make everyone some type of manager.... because generally speaking HR wise mangers are exempt from overtime. And before it's asked, yes even salary employee can be eligible for OT.

Originally posted by @Austin Fruechting :
Originally posted by @Matt K.:

I think the word investor gets tossed around here a lot more than it should. Plenty of people that seem to think they're investors after reading a book or two. Wholesaler is another popular title.... when it seems like by the questions that get asked they're not very proficient in their trade....

LOL at people calling themselves investor for reading a book. 

EXPOUNDING: Words don't matter, actions do. No one cares what you say, they care what you do. Titles don't matter, what you've done matters. 

 The people that really blow my mind are the people that want to walk from a  career/the workforce to "invest full time".... before they've even started. No history, no team, no projects in the pipeline, and most important no funding.

Thanks for all your thoughts.  I like the idea of just not putting a title on a card at all.  I hadn't considered that as an option.

@Matt K. That's the stuff of my nightmares.  Good way to trash your credit and name without a foundation under you.

Whenever I see “real estate investor” on a LinkedIn or social account, it does more to discredit a person than anything else.

Real estate investing is just like any other form of investing. You don’t see people putting “stock market investor” in bios. In my opinion, real estate should be left out as well.

If you’re a part timer, I’d keep it off.

That being said... talk to people about re and the deals you’ve done. Share your passion and connect with other likeminded individuals.

@Jennifer Delmore I will be honest when I see a company with 1-20 people and some 20 something year old has the title "head of operations" or "VP", I totally laugh inside. It is so transparent that they just got to just pick their own title. Maybe some people don't see through that. I think it is about picking a reasonable title so you have credibility. A 24 year old VP of Operations just tells me it is a small company. In that case the VP is either a relative of the owner or is the chief butt kisser. 

Originally posted by @Joe Splitrock :

@Jennifer Delmore I will be honest when I see a company with 1-20 people and some 20 something year old has the title "head of operations" or "VP", I totally laugh inside. It is so transparent that they just got to just pick their own title. Maybe some people don't see through that. I think it is about picking a reasonable title so you have credibility. A 24 year old VP of Operations just tells me it is a small company. In that case the VP is either a relative of the owner or is the chief butt kisser. 

 The last 2 sentences do not seem to have much merit. Age does not define work ethic. 

To the OP a job title is unimportant at least to me. In my current position and my last one you could find me wearing many different hats. To try and define them on a card is difficult. I just tell people I work in the automotive industry. 

Originally posted by @James McCard :
Originally posted by @Joe Splitrock:

@Jennifer Delmore I will be honest when I see a company with 1-20 people and some 20 something year old has the title "head of operations" or "VP", I totally laugh inside. It is so transparent that they just got to just pick their own title. Maybe some people don't see through that. I think it is about picking a reasonable title so you have credibility. A 24 year old VP of Operations just tells me it is a small company. In that case the VP is either a relative of the owner or is the chief butt kisser. 

 The last 2 sentences do not seem to have much merit. Age does not define work ethic. 

To the OP a job title is unimportant at least to me. In my current position and my last one you could find me wearing many different hats. To try and define them on a card is difficult. I just tell people I work in the automotive industry. 

I never said age defines work ethic. Lots of people have work ethic, it is experience that defines us. My point is at 24 years of age, you just haven't had enough time to gain experience to be a VP of a big company.

You can’t be a VP of anything of importance if it’s a one Man operation. I’ve seen people give themselves a “owner” title or “acquisitions manager”. I prefer the owner route as that’s literally the most honest. If you own a LLC or holding company that’s owns property you’re the owner.

Being the president or something else is just kind of trumped up