help dry rot found during inspection

17 Replies

@Denicia Alves have you gotten some quotes on how much it would be to repair?

Don't be afraid of this kind of stuff. Everything can be fixed, it just depends on how much it will be. I've found putting a number on things like this is really helpful to reducing fear and uncertainty. 

@Denicia Alves as @Will Gaston mentioned, everything can be fixed. You need to quantify the cost and make sure the deal numbers still work. Sometimes a "deal" is actually a money pit if it costs more to fix than the discount to market you are getting. Another factor can be experience level. The less experience you have and the bigger the problem, it may not make sense to tackle it. Also be aware that problems can spawn into bigger problems as you start tearing into them. Put another way, is this the tip of an iceberg? You say extensive, but that word is very subjective. Assuming it is really bad, proceed with caution. 

@Denicia Alves I just got a huge discount on a property purchase where there was extensive dry rot. I’m in New England however so it’s a different market than California.

For me the cost of the lumber is going to be as expensive as the labor.

I’m a little surprised if you’re on the local neighborhood/town Facebook site you’re not getting lots of recommendations. I belong to several local community pages where I own property and everyone is very quick to give recommendations when someone asks for one. Just yesterday we got 30 people who replied with where to take your car to get it inspected!!

You should be able to contact the building inspector and ask what the repairs should look like to get some type of idea of what you are looking for. The building inspector might have the name of contractors or your realtor. If possible try to get at least 2 quotes from different contractors to see if they tell you the same type of work is needed.

Also you can always go to Lowe’s or Home Depot or the local hardware store to get the names of some good reliable contractors from the lumber desk. Explain to them briefly what you need done and see if they can refer you a few people.

Originally posted by @Denicia Alves :

A property that I put an offer on has extensive amount of dry rot. Does anyone have experience with it?

 In my experience if I get a quote for 35k I expect once they ‘see what we are dealing with’ it often balloons to much more than the quote 

I would not think 35k was a small job

Personally with little to no experience I would walk 

There is always a reason property is "cheap". Without dry rot, there would be 90% less properties to flip out there. You need-needed repairs to get sellers to sell cheap. I never been lucky enough o find a flip that did not need repairs or improvements

That said, I always find more dry rot once I start digging behind the veneer.. hedge the hell out of your expense estimate. Most likely we always had to "shore up" the frame and weight of the building with beams to just hold up the roof while we worked to replace the rotted timber.. it actually gets kind of dangerous at times.

Moral of the story, peel off the veneer or sheet rock until you see no more dry rot, then you can estimate the cost

Originally posted by @Alecia Loveless :

You should be able to contact the building inspector and ask what the repairs should look like to get some type of idea of what you are looking for. The building inspector might have the name of contractors

At least out in the West, you'll never get a building inspector to do either of these things. They are setting themselves up for all kinds of bad stuff.....

@charley c.  I dont think this seller is going to budge on price. the seller provided this information to me before i put in an offer and its an as is purchase but me being a novice figured that it would still be a good investment not even thinking about how the est repair cost could drastically increase.