New realtor road map, what do you do if you're me?

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Hey guys, I've been devouring the BP podcast and finally started making my first move into real estate and want to get different opinions/critiques. This might be a lengthy post so I apologize. Last March I took my first full time job as an experiential market manager in Orlando and although my job is pretty fun I quickly realized why I was an independent contractor for so long. I don't particularly enjoy having a boss (putting it nicely). I always enjoyed working events because I'm not the shy guy, I love getting in front of people and even joined my local toastmasters group. So I finally took the real estate course online and took my state exam, first attempt I got a 72 and you need a 75 to pass. So I scheduled my second exam for the 28th this month. My girlfriend and I have talked about it a lot and we plan to buy our own house (preferably duplex) by the end of next year. I plan on proposing soon but just in case she has an account I won't say when. My main plan is to sign on with Keller Williams because of their in depth training. I used to sell insurance and the people I worked with wrote one policy in front of me, refused to let me take notes, and sent me off to get slaughtered. Needless to say I like to have a better framework then that and I do plan on keeping my full time job for awhile as well because I can't afford to go 100% full time as a realtor until I start seeing consistent results. I've read Brandon Turner's post on the ultimate realtor's guide to working with investors and plan on joining my local REIA to hopefully find a flipper that I can help find deals for. I'm going to practice analyzing deals based on the 70% rule for flippers. TLDR, my goals. 1. Become a realtor that understands how to find deals 2. Buy my first duplex within 12 months 3. Learn from the flipper(s) I'm helping and find a potential partner Question, if you're me what would you do first and how would you do it? Are there any resources you recommend, books, groups (in Orlando FL). My main first goal is getting to the point where I can work as a realtor full time and leave my other job. Thanks for reading this far.
@Mauricio Rezende . Do you want to be a full time realtor selling houses or just to work with investors or to just be an investor? If you just want to be an investor I wouldn’t be come a realtor
@Caleb Heimsoth why do you say that? Doesn't David Green do both? I think (for now) I want to be a full time realtor that works with investors and slowly buys rental properties of my own. Also sorry about the messy paragraph above, I swear I formated it but I guess my phone had other plans lol.
Originally posted by @Mauricio Rezende :
@Caleb Heimsoth why do you say that? Doesn't David Green do both? I think (for now) I want to be a full time realtor that works with investors and slowly buys rental properties of my own. Also sorry about the messy paragraph above, I swear I formated it but I guess my phone had other plans lol.

if you're on the app and you use paragraphs it won't show up when you post. Only does that on the desktop, not sure why. Anyways, yes I believe David Greene does that but I also disagree with other stuff he says (I also invest long distance). I say that because do you want to work in your business as an agent or on your business as an investor? Unless you're going to make a lot of low ball offers or buy or sell a lot of homes for yourself (and save commissions) it may not be worth it. Most agents make money that would qualify them to be below the poverty line

@Caleb Heimsoth I see what you're saying. I would like to be full time realtor (if I can make it) that's why initially I'm only going part time and plan on keeping my full time salary job. I know the salary will help me qualify for loans for my first few properties too. So I guess that'll depend on how it goes.
@Mauricio Rezende you are very wise to keep your job unless your girlfriend can pay all the bills for awhile. It can take a long time to get going in this business. If you don’t have a huge personal sphere consider joining a team for a year as they will provide you leads and support you while you learn. Most of my business is repeat and referral so my best advice is always treat your clients right, put them first, and learn to ask them for referrals and you’ll do great!

I would have to agree with Caleb above. I recommend that if you want to be a real estate agent and work with buyers and sellers, then get your license. If you're trying to get your license for "learning more" about being an investor, I would say skip it. Getting and maintaining a license costs thousands of dollars a year. There are plenty of great resources on BP that will teach you what you need to know to be successful as an investor.

Originally posted by Account Closed:

I would have to agree with Caleb above. I recommend that if you want to be a real estate agent and work with buyers and sellers, then get your license. If you're trying to get your license for "learning more" about being an investor, I would say skip it. Getting and maintaining a license costs thousands of dollars a year. There are plenty of great resources on BP that will teach you what you need to know to be successful as an investor.

 This hurts me.

Reason is, is because I am taking courses this semester that relate to real estate and yes includes the pre-course requirements to then go and take my state exam here in FL. 

And no, I have no desire to work commission. I make good money now. I have a broker who is willing to hire me part time, thankfully so maybe that is my silver lining. But ultimately, I just want to grow a portfolio of long hold properties and collect rent. 

So in a sense that does work for me since I'll save on commission. But really, that's it. Unless my part time (weekends.) work with my broker can pull in additional income, like a few thousands each month, then nothing else really is worth it. 

Oh, and access to the MLS too, I guess.

@Mauricio Rezende - Sounds good, just wanted to ensure that you fully understand the costs associated with getting your license so you're not surprised once you get started. Also there's at least a few BP podcast episodes (and I think blog posts too) that go through the benefits/drawbacks of getting your license while being an investor. 

@Cristian Aviles-Morales - It is good that you are taking courses that will teach you more about real estate (and hopefully benefiting you as an investor too). I certainly have also learned some from getting my license, in terms of how a real estate agent fits into an investor's business (and it has helped me understand how other agents work too, negotiation skills, etc). And, if you're going to be an active investor and use your license to help your investing business, then more power to you! Direct MLS access is also a plus.