Best part time entry level job for RE

6 Replies

What would be your recommendation for a college student who is trying to get exposed to RE in terms of an entry level job? I would be willing to run errands for a real estate investor, do data entry, or whatever. What job could I get now to be an asset to an investor?

Hey Caleb,

Good to see you are looking to get your feet wet in this REI goodness. Here are a few recommendations:

1) Work in a local realty office. I am sure you will learn a lot from the agents in the office. You could also become an agent and do it part time while in school
2) Reach out to local contractors and see if they could use any help
3) Go to a local investor meetup, announce yourself and let the group know you are looking for a job. Don't be shy!
4) Post to BP about you looking for a job. Make sure to mention your town as well as others in the description as many members have keyword alerts setup for specific towns

Good luck on your search and let me know if you need any help!

@Caleb Lea

Yeah, the "shadowing" the investor concept that keep coming up is somewhat difficult.  The whole point is that it isn't an office job and the work is somewhat 24/7 sometimes, like a real estate agent.

Doing office work at a real estate brokerage could be useful.  But, usually the focus is on sales, not investment.  But, you'd get the exposure to the transactions.  Don't forget about "larger" commercial/investment companies out there.  Some of those start getting bigger at above 10+ people so need some help.

In addition to the above, you might look at property management companies (which usually require some sort of licensure/certification).  

Otherwise, probably the best might be to go to investor Meetup so you can chat a variety of people, get the exposure and understanding to the various facets of REI, and go from there.

Good luck.

I would go get a job with a contractor.  Better yet and maybe even for more money see if there is a trade union apprentice school around you where you could learn plumbing and/or electrical and/or HVAC.  Get paid good money while you learn.  Those skills will last you a lifetime.   Even if you want to be on the money side of things, you will learn so much about estimating, the right way to do things, the places trades try to shortcut, rehab costs, etc.  Spend a year in various trades, plumbing, electrical,framing, HVAC, or GC work.   

Save the big money you will make and bank it up so you have a giant stash in 2-3-4 years to start making some great cash offers.

If you are more of a paperwork and office guy....you should still go and work construction, but if you 100% refuse, go work for a title company or a lender or a hard money lender.  Should be plenty of part time work for the right go getter.

It depends on your skill set. Are you handy at all? If so, like Bruce and Brandon said above, go work for a GC or a PM company that has their own maintenance staff. I learned how to "work on" a house by doing my one and only flip, and then have refined those skills on my rentals over the years. If you have no desire to sling a roller or a hammer, get a job as an Admin in an PM company. That way you get exposed to the numbers of managing properties as well as the office in general and what it is like working with Owners as well as Residents. Obviously getting your RE license will expose you to all things Real Estate and then you can be an Investment-focused agent. But, your head is in the right place in getting experience before you just jump into RE. Also, just read/listen/watch everything you can on BP, YouTube, etc. Good luck!

Cold call or drop-by on property managers, real estate brokerages, large investment companies, title companies, local lenders and ask what kind of help they might need at their office.

If you like to be on social platforms you could probably get a job creating content for one of the above.

I would put more weight on experience gained from the job than pay.  For example, I would suggest working for a team or single agent than the front desk of a brokerage.  Just listening and being a part of the sales process will help you tremendously.  

Learning sales will only help you even if you end up hating real estate.



Originally posted by @Caleb Lea :

What would be your recommendation for a college student who is trying to get exposed to RE in terms of an entry level job? I would be willing to run errands for a real estate investor, do data entry, or whatever. What job could I get now to be an asset to an investor?

 Definitely a Realtor. What I'd recommend doing is getting on the team of an investor focused Realtor so he/she can pump you with leads and training to get you moving. If you just try to go it alone you won't be doing much of anything unless you're a marketing wizard.