Slab Foundation Repair in Texas

4 Replies

I'm not so sure this is a question of what contractor to use, but it is definitely about whether there is a better time of year to get a foundation repaired.

Anyway, we have a rental in Fort Worth. We had some foundation work done in January 2015. The work failed. A big long crack in the entry room tile showed up. Some external trim bowed away from a corner of the house. The converted garage was visibly crooked. After some legal wrangling, I decided to abandon pursuing a claim against the contractor who did the work  (incidentally, he ended up denying we ever did business!). Now there are more cracks, basically "spider webbing" away from the long, straight crack that appeared initially.

So here's where we're at. A business associate of mine has recommended I wait until the soil is wetter to get the foundation work done. He says if I do it now, they may pound 1,2 or 3 piers to resistance. If I wait until the soil is wetter, we might get 5 or 6 piers and thus a job done better. He's been pretty knowledgeable about maintenance issues, so I take what he says quite seriously. Given the foundation work that failed was done in January when the ground was pretty dry, I'm even more inclined to perhaps heed his advice. But no one knows everything about everything, so here I am on BP for more

Regardless, I do plan on using a local, reputable company- something I didn't do last time. Does anyone know if there's anything to this theory on time of year/wetness of soil and foundation repair?

Any thoughts or information will be greatly appreciated.

In my experience it does not matter the time of year.  Who does it matters most.  Go with a reputable company that has been in business under the same name for at least 10 years.  This does not imply the company that charges the most either.  Typical cost should run around $200/pier.  My foundation contractor typically goes down 8-15 piers depending on area. 

Originally posted by @Rocky V. :

In my experience it does not matter the time of year.  Who does it matters most.  Go with a reputable company that has been in business under the same name for at least 10 years.  This does not imply the company that charges the most either.  Typical cost should run around $200/pier.  My foundation contractor typically goes down 8-15 piers depending on area. 

 Thanks for the info, Rocky. Yeah, I've seen quotes all over the map. For 19 piers, we had quotes anywhere from $5,000-$10,000. I may need more piers now.

I agree that the soil being wet does not matter because when the soil drys it will settle. it depends on The soil classification and if they can get bearing. The spider cracks shouldn’t matter too much since concrete will crack and those can be from other factors like curing and air temp but could be from settling. Check to see if the other companies have a solid warranty. Good luck and sorry to hear about a terrible contractor.

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