House with a Well- I'm clueless

8 Replies

I'm looking at a house which has well water only. I'm clueless as to what to look for, questions to ask, pros cons?

The house was built in 1955, block home and per the owner they had a new well put in which cost 6K (per the owner)

Questions to ask: Why was a new well drilled (if what is new, is a new well hole). Or was it just new plumbing? New pressure tank, new pump, new lines, new regulator. If it was a new well hole, why was it needed? Did the old one dry up, was the water nasty? Smell and drink the water. Prior to buying, get a water test done if you have any doubts. Does the home have a septic tank then? Usually if you have a well, you'd probably have a septic. Whats the condition of that? When was it last pumped (if ever). IS it connected to sewer? Is there a well house? Or is all of the plumbing equipment inside the home, and the well just has a small cover and is plumbed into the house, with the pressure tank and equipment in the home?

Pros: No water bill. 

Cons: Condition of water. Are there periodic water tests required in your area, especially if this will be a rental. Water filters needed? No electricity means no water as well, if theres no electricity to run the pump, as opposed to city water, even if the power is out, you have running water.

If it's a new well it should have a plate on the top of well that tells how deep and how many gallons per minute. If the pump works there is not really much to check you might want to have the water checked to make sure it is ok

Is the house in an area with well water only or is it in a city location with water hookups available?  I know up in many of the rural areas in East Pasco you're looking at well water only but along the us 19 corridor I would expect city water hookups.  I often see old wells in city areas that are used for irrigation only.  I would have a water quality check done to see what the condition is.  If you're looking at it as a rental I'd much rather have the city water otherwise you're adding a whole set of well related expenses.  

Originally posted by @Stephen Schaefer :

Questions to ask: Why was a new well drilled (if what is new, is a new well hole). Or was it just new plumbing? New pressure tank, new pump, new lines, new regulator. If it was a new well hole, why was it needed? Did the old one dry up, was the water nasty? Smell and drink the water. Prior to buying, get a water test done if you have any doubts. Does the home have a septic tank then? Usually if you have a well, you'd probably have a septic. Whats the condition of that? When was it last pumped (if ever). IS it connected to sewer? Is there a well house? Or is all of the plumbing equipment inside the home, and the well just has a small cover and is plumbed into the house, with the pressure tank and equipment in the home?

Pros: No water bill. 

Cons: Condition of water. Are there periodic water tests required in your area, especially if this will be a rental. Water filters needed? No electricity means no water as well, if theres no electricity to run the pump, as opposed to city water, even if the power is out, you have running water.

No well house, its outside with a big blue top...I should've took a picture! Thank you for the q's to ask...I'm making a list pulling it right off what you've said. Like I said, I'm very clueless to this. I had no idea about the electric, so if a storm knocks out the electric you have no water.

Originally posted by @Patrick L. :

Is the house in an area with well water only or is it in a city location with water hookups available?  I know up in many of the rural areas in East Pasco you're looking at well water only but along the us 19 corridor I would expect city water hookups.  I often see old wells in city areas that are used for irrigation only.  I would have a water quality check done to see what the condition is.  If you're looking at it as a rental I'd much rather have the city water otherwise you're adding a whole set of well related expenses.  

 I'd have to check if there is a city water hook up option...the house is in Carrollwood area. I agree, I'd much rather have city water.

You're welcome. And my response wasn't to discourage you at all, either. Wells can be great. They're not these terrible nuisances, they just have a potential to be one. I prefer a well over city water. No water/sewer bill is great, and once you drink well water everyday, all city water tastes like chlorine. The power outage problem can be annoying, just depends where you live. Few times a year if you lose power for an hour, its not that big of a deal, just mind the toilets!

If you do, get a meter on the well and charge the tenant a waterbill to help cover the expenses of well, filtration, and septic work.  Also if they have elevated land you can set it up so that you've got a storage tank that supplies the house through the use of gravity (no worries about that power being out! - until the tank is empty, but then you should also have a solar powered system!)

If it is a rental you want to make sure you know if it will affect your tenant pool. If it is common in the area for well water then you shouldn't run into an issue. If however it is more of a rare occurrence know that it may be a turn off for some of your tenants. We looked at a house that was on well water and city. Really cool set up. Well water was used for lawncare/sprinklers and the rest was on city. You could keep your yard green and it cost you $0.00 

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