What is the average Cap Rate in San Antonio Area?

8 Replies

Hi!  I'm new as an investor in the San Antonio, TX area. My strategy will be to buy, rehab and rent properties with good cash flow.

What do you think is the average Cap Rate in San Antonio, TX?

I'm trying to find an easy way to decide which properties have good cash flow and what is considered as average good cash flow.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Regards,

Adriel Ramirez

Hi Adriel,

There are a lot of sub-markets in San Antonio - so your cap rate will depend on where it is, type of building (A,B,C...etc...), and even things like age of building.  Here's a link to a new report issued by Marcus and Millichamp on the San Antonio market today - they have great free research on the major metro areas.  This might help guide you as to what's going on and where.  It also gives you some overall average data for the area - which seems to be what you are asking about.  http://www.marcusmillichap.com/research/researchre...

Good luck!

@Adriel Ramirez

Do you plan to buy single-family dwellings, 2 - 4 units residential properties, 5 - 24 unit apartment buildings, or larger apartment complexes? I've never bought anything over an 8-unit property, and I've never owned (for any length of time) or managed anything larger than a four-plex, so I will speak to what I know.  

It's important to realize that cash flow and cap rate are two different things.  A property can have a good cap rate, but zero cash flow.    It all depends on whether you pay cash, finance it, loan terms, how much work is required, lease rates, vacancy rates, whether you manage it or pay a company, property taxes, and several other factors. 

When I look at residential rentals, I typically buy 2 - 4 unit buildings. I look for $500+/month cash flow in an area that will appreciate rapidly (typically central city, in and around historic districts).  My strategy is to only own a few years, cash flow well and capture equity through rapid appreciation, then sell. 

Conversely, I know several investors that only invest in SFRs in Northwest & Northeast San Antonio.  Typically 80's & 90's tract-built homes, with solid rental bases.  Most of these investors are happy with $300/month cash flow, little appreciation, and low vacancy.  There is also less turnover in SFRs.  Just a different strategy.  

I have heard of investors using the 1% & 2% rules in this market and others, but I have never paid much attention to those "rules."  I may use them as a starting point to evaluate a deal sent to me from and agent or wholesaler, but I don't let them make or break my purchase decision.

I know this didn't give you a definitive answer to any of your questions, but the reality is type of acquisition and end goal (strategy) help define the answers to those questions. 

Originally posted by @Mark Mosch :

Hi Adriel,

There are a lot of sub-markets in San Antonio - so your cap rate will depend on where it is, type of building (A,B,C...etc...), and even things like age of building.  Here's a link to a new report issued by Marcus and Millichamp on the San Antonio market today - they have great free research on the major metro areas.  This might help guide you as to what's going on and where.  It also gives you some overall average data for the area - which seems to be what you are asking about.  http://www.marcusmillichap.com/research/researchre...

Good luck!

 Thank you for the link and the interesting information!

Originally posted by @Seth Teel :

@Adriel Ramirez

Do you plan to buy single-family dwellings, 2 - 4 units residential properties, 5 - 24 unit apartment buildings, or larger apartment complexes? I've never bought anything over an 8-unit property, and I've never owned (for any length of time) or managed anything larger than a four-plex, so I will speak to what I know.  

It's important to realize that cash flow and cap rate are two different things.  A property can have a good cap rate, but zero cash flow.    It all depends on whether you pay cash, finance it, loan terms, how much work is required, lease rates, vacancy rates, whether you manage it or pay a company, property taxes, and several other factors. 

When I look at residential rentals, I typically buy 2 - 4 unit buildings. I look for $500+/month cash flow in an area that will appreciate rapidly (typically central city, in and around historic districts).  My strategy is to only own a few years, cash flow well and capture equity through rapid appreciation, then sell. 

Conversely, I know several investors that only invest in SFRs in Northwest & Northeast San Antonio.  Typically 80's & 90's tract-built homes, with solid rental bases.  Most of these investors are happy with $300/month cash flow, little appreciation, and low vacancy.  There is also less turnover in SFRs.  Just a different strategy.  

I have heard of investors using the 1% & 2% rules in this market and others, but I have never paid much attention to those "rules."  I may use them as a starting point to evaluate a deal sent to me from and agent or wholesaler, but I don't let them make or break my purchase decision.

I know this didn't give you a definitive answer to any of your questions, but the reality is type of acquisition and end goal (strategy) help define the answers to those questions. 

 Thank You Seth! The unit I'm looking at is a duplex about 6 miles east from the airport towards Randolph Air base, but not that far.

Appt#1: 2 bedroom/1 Bath/1 car garage - Rent $700

Appt#2: 2 bedroom/2 Bath/1 car garage - Rent $700

Taxes: 2,666 Insurance: 800. Will put 5% down 20 year conventional

Monthly payment: Ins+Taxes+mortgage = 67+222+411 = 700

If you go by the BG calculator it adds another $350 a month for vacancy + Capex + Repairs. So by the BP calculator I have a cash flow of only $350.

Will this be considered a good cash flow? Being my first deal I want to make sure I'm not under to what is considered a decent cash flow in the SA area.

Thanks again for your help!

"Good" cash flow is relative. What was the purchase price? I'm assuming you paid around $85k (assuming a 4% interest rate and 20 year note)? If so looks like you're getting around 25% return on your cash outlay. That sounds like a great return on your investment. 

It doesn't sound like a bad deal at all. If you don't mind sharing the street name or even just zip code?  There are a few "war zones" near the area of town you are mentioning. Good cash flow and/or cash on cash return, may not outweigh chasing rents and high turnover.  

Originally posted by @Angel Cepeda :

"Good" cash flow is relative. What was the purchase price? I'm assuming you paid around $85k (assuming a 4% interest rate and 20 year note)? If so looks like you're getting around 25% return on your cash outlay. That sounds like a great return on your investment. 

 Property is value is 70,000 but will need rehab before renting. My investment would be $28,500 (20,000 rehab + 3,500 down payment 5% + 5,000 closing cost) and based on the BG calculator my cash flow is 350 a month.  There are other options like to get a loan with rehab cost included so that I don't have to put down the 20,000 for the rehab or to refinance after the rehab since it will appreciate to around 110,000 to recuperate most of the capital and keep investing. 

I guess the main question I have is what other investors think of this deal.

Thanks again!

Originally posted by @Seth Teel :

It doesn't sound like a bad deal at all. If you don't mind sharing the street name or even just zip code?  There are a few "war zones" near the area of town you are mentioning. Good cash flow and/or cash on cash return, may not outweigh chasing rents and high turnover.  

 Hi Seth, The zip code is 78239. What do you think of this area? Being new in town makes things a bit harder to get a good idea of the neighborhood.

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