Lead Paint

6 Replies

I am currently looking a home that was built in the 60s. The owner has discussed that it is unknown if there is lead paint (never been tested).  I have had a suggestion that all home in this time frame have lead paint, however if I do no get it inspected for lead paint, I will not be required to fix the problem. Knowing that new paint has been painted over the existing old paint. Would this be a smart move to move forward knowing it could up when I try and resale later on? 

A little about the property:

This is a home I plan to fix up (carpet and new paint only). Live in for a year then rent out and move on to another project. Purchase price is $230K, ARV $300-$315K

Lead paint was know as a hazard back in the 1950s. There may not be much lead pain in a 1960s house. Lead paint was used because it was more durable. It tended to be more of it in more expensive houses. Often it is just trim, door frames and such that are lead. So it may not take much to remove the lead. 

I cant speak to TX law but federal law, you have to give a lead disclosure form stating whether you know there is lead or not. It also offers the buyer a 10 day inspection to see if there is lead (which they can decline) Even if you know there is lead paint you do not necessarily have to remove it.

Lead is much more an issue for rental properties than it is for flips.

Originally posted by @Ned Carey :

Lead paint was know as a hazard back in the 1950s. There may not be much lead pain in a 1960s house. Lead paint was used because it was more durable. It tended to be more of it in more expensive houses. Often it is just trim, door frames and such that are lead. So it may not take much to remove the lead. 

I cant speak to TX law but federal law, you have to give a lead disclosure form stating whether you know there is lead or not. It also offers the buyer a 10 day inspection to see if there is lead (which they can decline) Even if you know there is lead paint you do not necessarily have to remove it.

Lead is much more an issue for rental properties than it is for flips.

This year we have to register every rental built before 1978 and pay an annual $30 fee in Maryland.  Unless you go through the lead free process.   Then it's $10 and your done.  But it can be expensive if not renovating anyway.
Then there is an inspection by a certified lead inspector between tenants which can run between $300 to $1,000 from the pricing we just did.

Our largest unit costs about $220 for inspection  and it's 1300 SF. I was told that it would cost more if I had original windows since that would involve extra swipes.

The lead laws vary by state but there is a federal lead law.  https://www.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-pai..In 1960 you have I believe a 24% chance of having lead in the home.

If you plan to rent I would test it, you are always going to disclose the possibility of lead and if you are planning to renovate you can remove as you go along eliminating lead. You have 4 years.  Keep in mind lead is most prevalent in outside paint in houses of this era.  It can be anywhere but bigger problems for you are peeling chipping paint and painted doors and windows. It was also used in window glazing and in finish coatings of old wood (varnishes) but that is usually in houses older then yours. Now if you were going to sell what you say is true you could just say I don' t know if you don't test.

@Ned Carey you're right.  Those were the quotes we received.  We paid $330.00 and it is in Montgomery County.  The Certified contractor deal limits the competition a little, like the asbestos certifications in the 70's and 80's (yes I'm old).  From what I read a multi family is $30 per year for each rental, mine is a SF.
@Beth L. Thanks Beth, we were about the same size, a little bigger.   We had replaced the windows a few years ago and the wood had to be tested then too.  It was lead free.
We haven't checked on what it takes for a lead free certification but probably should have.