How to find a motivated realtor

23 Replies

I am currently looking for a home under $35K  to flip in the Montgomery, AL area (where I am working). I am finding that my current realtor is not really engaging with me. He is very responsive but he never contacts me first. I would like to have a realtor that can be more of my partner.  I'm the one finding the houses, checking them out, doing the research and pretty much just reaching out to the realtor to find out information that wasn't available online.

I am having a similar issue with finding a multifamily house under $150K in the Florida Panhandle. First, she told me that finding a house like that would be rare with my budget, even though I was able to find 8 online, of which 4 I was interested in. Then, after I told her I was happy with my lending option, she tried to push her personal lender on to me. I was able to politely decline but again, it seems like I'm the one doing the effort to find the houses. And then she waits to the last minute to set up a time for me to view them so, twice, I set aside time to see houses and they weren't available.

I'm new to this so I just wanted to know if this is common and how can I find a quality realtor? I've spoke to several and they all seem super motivated in the moment but the next day, it's like nothing. I think I will let both of them just peter off but I would like some advice on finding someone new.

I think that the first realtor you mentioned is good. The second one, not so much.

While you may think you're spending time finding these deals and running the numbers on them. That is normal, you are the investor and you should be finding the deals and then sharing them with your agent to review them further. 

You said they were responsive which is great. You need that

Also, sometimes it takes the realtor and you to do a couple deals together and then things start moving in a better direction.

Originally posted by @Antoine Martel :

I think that the first realtor you mentioned is good. The second one, not so much.

While you may think you're spending time finding these deals and running the numbers on them. That is normal, you are the investor and you should be finding the deals and then sharing them with your agent to review them further. 

You said they were responsive which is great. You need that

Also, sometimes it takes the realtor and you to do a couple deals together and then things start moving in a better direction.

 Thank you. That's good to know. I want to make sure I have reasonable expectations. The first one actually just reached out to me so I'll make sure to exercise more patience.

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

I agree with @Antoine Martel The first Realtor sounds like they are doing a decent job, especially with this being your first time working with this person and they don't know exactly what you like and don't like yet.  The other Realtor seems a bit more questionable, but on occasion especially with multifamily properties coordinating with tenants for interior inspections before the seller has an accepted offer can be difficult.

Originally posted by @Erik Whiting :

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

 That is a very constructive consideration. Thank you. I guess my next step would be figuring how do I identify the type 2 quality realtor and how can I position myself to be the type of client they would want to hold onto.

Originally posted by @Aaron Klatt :

I agree with @Antoine Martel The first Realtor sounds like they are doing a decent job, especially with this being your first time working with this person and they don't know exactly what you like and don't like yet.  The other Realtor seems a bit more questionable, but on occasion especially with multifamily properties coordinating with tenants for interior inspections before the seller has an accepted offer can be difficult.

Yes that has definitely been a challenge with being able to just get a look at the houses, but I don't think she is doing us any favors calling people the day before asking to come over in the middle of the day in the middle of the week. She did imply in a conversation that the potential commission for the house I want would be very low for her, as $150K is the limit and the house will potentially be a rental property, I would like to get as low a price as possible. I am concerned that the small commission may play into her procrastination.


Originally posted by :

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

 That is a very constructive consideration. Thank you. I guess my next step would be figuring how do I identify the type 2 quality realtor and how can I position myself to be the type of client they would want to hold onto.

Trial and error. Send a "hey newbies!" card or poster to every local real estate brokerage firm in the areas you want to invest. Tell them EXACTLY what you are looking for: price range, beds, baths, square footage, days on market, school districts, etc. Let them know that you WILL make an offer if the property they present meets all your criteria. Again, 9 out of 10 will just set a list to spam you with everything that hits the MLS. You can delete/block those. The guy/gal who CALLS/TEXTS you with, "Hey @Jozelle B, I just found this deal on 123 Anywhere Ave for this price and it's exactly what you said you wanted...." THAT'S your agent! Then you have to do your part and write that offer same day...get them paid. Earn their loyalty. It's what you'd want someone to do for you if positions were reversed, yes?

Account Closed it probably does play into her procrastination, especially if she is telling you that, if you give an agent a weekend date that you would like to see a property, they should either be able to get you in by scheduling at least 24-48 hours ahead of time or the seller does not want anyone to see the unit until they have an accepted offer.

Originally posted by :
Originally posted by:
Originally posted by :

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

 That is a very constructive consideration. Thank you. I guess my next step would be figuring how do I identify the type 2 quality realtor and how can I position myself to be the type of client they would want to hold onto.

Trial and error. Send a "hey newbies!" card or poster to every local real estate brokerage firm in the areas you want to invest. Tell them EXACTLY what you are looking for: price range, beds, baths, square footage, days on market, school districts, etc. Let them know that you WILL make an offer if the property they present meets all your criteria. Again, 9 out of 10 will just set a list to spam you with everything that hits the MLS. You can delete/block those. The guy/gal who CALLS/TEXTS you with, "Hey @Jozelle B, I just found this deal on 123 Anywhere Ave for this price and it's exactly what you said you wanted...." THAT'S your agent! Then you have to do your part and write that offer same day...get them paid. Earn their loyalty. It's what you'd want someone to do for you if positions were reversed, yes?

When you say "card or poster", do you mean like a physical mail out or would email be ok?

Originally posted by :it probably does play into her procrastination, especially if she is telling you that, if you give an agent a weekend date that you would like to see a property, they should either be able to get you in by scheduling at least 24-48 hours ahead of time or the seller does not want anyone to see the unit until they have an accepted offer.

 If they have an accepted offer, when they buyer does see the unit, if they find a problem, can they rescind it?

Originally posted by :
Originally posted by :
Originally posted by
Originally posted by :

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

 That is a very constructive consideration. Thank you. I guess my next step would be figuring how do I identify the type 2 quality realtor and how can I position myself to be the type of client they would want to hold onto.

Trial and error. Send a "hey newbies!" card or poster to every local real estate brokerage firm in the areas you want to invest. Tell them EXACTLY what you are looking for: price range, beds, baths, square footage, days on market, school districts, etc. Let them know that you WILL make an offer if the property they present meets all your criteria. Again, 9 out of 10 will just set a list to spam you with everything that hits the MLS. You can delete/block those. The guy/gal who CALLS/TEXTS you with, "Hey @Account Closed , I just found this deal on 123 Anywhere Ave for this price and it's exactly what you said you wanted...." THAT'S your agent! Then you have to do your part and write that offer same day...get them paid. Earn their loyalty. It's what you'd want someone to do for you if positions were reversed, yes?

When you say "card or poster", do you mean like a physical mail out or would email be ok?

Jozelle, If you're anywhere within a 30 minute drive, I'd personally take something to the Broker's office and find somewhere conspicuous to stick it.  Maybe ask the Broker if they have a bulletin board.  I hear there are some folks who use physical bulletin boards!   It might make you stand out in a world where everything is digital.  Make is an unusually bright color: chartreuse or hot pink.  Maybe put some paper fliers on top of a box of donuts or bagels.  People love food, and donuts are cheap. 

Emails...bleh.  Everyone gets 100 per day and deletes most of them.  The name of this game is who remembers you:  "Jozelle? Oh yeah, she's that nice gal who was here last Friday at the weekly agents meeting and she brought us that tray of bagels and fruit."

They won't remember the dozens of wannabe investors who send 5 emails per day and are just like so much SPAM.  Do you read all the emails you received?  I don't.  My delete percentage is something around 90% of what I receive.  Be memorable within reason.  Find out when and how you can get in front of 2-3 dozen agents and make a positive impression for under $50 and I bet you find a deal or two.

Originally posted by :
Originally posted by :
Originally posted by :
Originally posted by
Originally posted by :

Around my area, there are two kinds of "quality" Realtors: the first kind are big boys/gals who have been doing this for 10+ years and are selling houses to owner occupant, high-income buyers with a price tag north of $250,000, and the second kind are the ones you want: the highly moviated, savvy newbie agent out to make a name for himself/herself and will work themselves to the bone to get some deals flowing.

You don't want the first kind and they don't want you. Why should they scramble combing thru the MLS for you to earn a 3% commission on a $35K house that you'll try to negotiate down to $20K (or you will try that if you are me!). It's not worth their time showing you 20-30 houses for a $600 paycheck that their broker takes 25% of and then the tax man takes another 15%. Most real estate agents get into the game so they can start listing top dollar homes and hire a "team".

So you need the ones who haven't earned the credibility yet to where people are flocking to their door to list stuff.  For every 10 agents, all but 1 will be out of the game in 2 years.  You need to the find that one who has the motivation and the street smarts to make their name.  It's trial and error, for sure, and unfortunately once they hit it big time you may drop off their list because they'll only be interested in the high dollar homes/commissions.  That said, there are 2-3 agents in my town that seem to specialize in cheap houses or foreclosures.  Problem is most folks already know who they are so you are competing with 20 or so other investors.  You need to find the next newbie agent who will join the ranks of the "investor" Realtors and be the 1st or 2nd person to get on their buyers list, then when they send you a deal you write an offer the same day.  Get them paid 4-5 times in a few months and they'll attach to you.  Starving, motivated agents will work for you!

 That is a very constructive consideration. Thank you. I guess my next step would be figuring how do I identify the type 2 quality realtor and how can I position myself to be the type of client they would want to hold onto.

Trial and error. Send a "hey newbies!" card or poster to every local real estate brokerage firm in the areas you want to invest. Tell them EXACTLY what you are looking for: price range, beds, baths, square footage, days on market, school districts, etc. Let them know that you WILL make an offer if the property they present meets all your criteria. Again, 9 out of 10 will just set a list to spam you with everything that hits the MLS. You can delete/block those. The guy/gal who CALLS/TEXTS you with, "Hey @Jozelle B, I just found this deal on 123 Anywhere Ave for this price and it's exactly what you said you wanted...." THAT'S your agent! Then you have to do your part and write that offer same day...get them paid. Earn their loyalty. It's what you'd want someone to do for you if positions were reversed, yes?

When you say "card or poster", do you mean like a physical mail out or would email be ok?

Jozelle, If you're anywhere within a 30 minute drive, I'd personally take something to the Broker's office and find somewhere conspicuous to stick it.  Maybe ask the Broker if they have a bulletin board.  I hear there are some folks who use physical bulletin boards!   It might make you stand out in a world where everything is digital.  Make is an unusually bright color: chartreuse or hot pink.  Maybe put some paper fliers on top of a box of donuts or bagels.  People love food, and donuts are cheap. 

Emails...bleh.  Everyone gets 100 per day and deletes most of them.  The name of this game is who remembers you:  "Jozelle? Oh yeah, she's that nice gal who was here last Friday at the weekly agents meeting and she brought us that tray of bagels and fruit."

They won't remember the dozens of wannabe investors who send 5 emails per day and are just like so much SPAM.  Do you read all the emails you received?  I don't.  My delete percentage is something around 90% of what I receive.  Be memorable within reason.  Find out when and how you can get in front of 2-3 dozen agents and make a positive impression for under $50 and I bet you find a deal or two.

That is a really great idea! Thank you, Erik. I'm going to see how things continue to play out with this realtor I have in Pensacola which is about a 3 hour drive away. I'm not sending her any new listings. Instead, I'll research some other realtors in the area and see when would be the best day to come by. Its hard since I work during the week but I can figure something out.

Account Closed Yes as long as your offers are written contingent on interior inspection.

I had a similar issue, I was using an agent to look at SFHs rentals. We were looking at houses that were in the mid-100s.He had set his ways only wanted to show X number of houses then at a  higher price range.

He is also an investor, kind of a conflict of interest too!

This agent was not willing to work for such pay back, so we parted ways.

I will say I found an agent who is hungry. I use her and give all my contacts to her for business, she has made 2 nice sales since then and working on number 3.

I do have a system of helping her so she is not spending a lot of money showing SFH to my contacts or myself. until I have given a drive by, looking at comps, past taxes etc.…

Originally posted by @Billy Smith :

I had a similar issue, I was using an agent to look at SFHs rentals. We were looking at houses that were in the mid-100s.He had set his ways only wanted to show X number of houses then at a  higher price range.

He is also an investor, kind of a conflict of interest too!

This agent was not willing to work for such pay back, so we parted ways.

I will say I found an agent who is hungry. I use her and give all my contacts to her for business, she has made 2 nice sales since then and working on number 3.

I do have a system of helping her so she is not spending a lot of money showing SFH to my contacts or myself. until I have given a drive by, looking at comps, past taxes etc.…

Well it's a good thing you were able to find someone that was a better fit. However, I don't understand why him being an investor was a conflict of interest. Were you all working together to finance the purchase?

Originally posted by Account Closed:
Originally posted by @Billy Smith:

I had a similar issue, I was using an agent to look at SFHs rentals. We were looking at houses that were in the mid-100s.He had set his ways only wanted to show X number of houses then at a  higher price range.

He is also an investor, kind of a conflict of interest too!

This agent was not willing to work for such pay back, so we parted ways.

I will say I found an agent who is hungry. I use her and give all my contacts to her for business, she has made 2 nice sales since then and working on number 3.

I do have a system of helping her so she is not spending a lot of money showing SFH to my contacts or myself. until I have given a drive by, looking at comps, past taxes etc.…

Well it's a good thing you were able to find someone that was a better fit. However, I don't understand why him being an investor was a conflict of interest. Were you all working together to finance the purchase?

 Well I found out he was not telling me about  new houses on  the market ,may have been giving it to other investors .These are good questions to ask a agent, how many investors are you working  for, who gets first  look?

@Billy Smith

Most people on Bigger Pockets will tell you the opposite. Most will tell you make sure your agent is also an investor themselves so that they understand the ins and outs of property investing.

Are agents sharing opportunities with multiple people? Yes. Because not all investors will want the same property. Every investor you meet will have different criteria for their search and different risk profiles. As an example... some rehabbers will not work with occupied properties, others will. Some want properties that need cosmetic fixes only, others are willing to knock it down. So, if I have a list of 10 investors, not all will want every opportunity, but I might share something with 1 or 2 because I never know where they are at with their other projects.

Originally posted by @Christopher Phillips :

Billy Smith

Most people on Bigger Pockets will tell you the opposite. Most will tell you make sure your agent is also an investor themselves so that they understand the ins and outs of property investing.

Are agents sharing opportunities with multiple people? Yes. Because not all investors will want the same property. Every investor you meet will have different criteria for their search and different risk profiles. As an example... some rehabbers will not work with occupied properties, others will. Some want properties that need cosmetic fixes only, others are willing to knock it down. So, if I have a list of 10 investors, not all will want every opportunity, but I might share something with 1 or 2 because I never know where they are at with their other projects.

Like I said you need to ask questions like how many investors do have that are wanting the same price range, type of houses, area etc... I have had issues with this. One would hope that an agent would not do this, but like any folks you can have problems, this is the world we live in.

For me I do not need any special agent as long as they have a license. Fact last deal I used no agent I have the knowledge, that saved me 6K

I did find an agent that I do like, willing to take a price cut to make a deal happen, goes the extra mile, among other qualities

Account Closed, you said you were looking to flip something under $35k in the Montgomery area.  I know Auburn isn't Montgomery, but it's in the area.  ;-)  I'm looking at a house, probably on Saturday, if you are interested in tagging along.  It's vacant and unlocked, so I'm bringing a couple of people because, to be honest, I'm nervous about what I'll find as the owner doesn't want to join.  They are very hands off and not good at answering questions...as in I don't even know for sure how many beds and baths.  (An agent said they think it's a 3/1, but the place is for sale by owner, so no one knows for sure.)  But I'm hoping that one of us can get it for a good deal, but it won't hurt my feelings if it's not me.  I don't think the ask is good, $25k, but we will see what it looks like inside.  However, it's boarded up, so I'm not expecting much inside.  However, I think this house would do better as a low income or Section 8 rental (what I was planning, if I decided I liked it), instead of a flip, but I don't know much about flipping, so maybe I'm wrong.  The house is in a low income neighborhood, though.  I'm in it to improve the neighborhood, so if that means you (or someone else) buys it, I won't be sad.  :-)  Let me know if you want to tag along for the adventure. :-D  Oh, and though I don't know for sure, I suspect the property line ends at the line of trees in the middle of the pic.  Hopefully I'm wrong.  lol

yea I would love to check it out. I’ll message you to get more of the details. Maybe my contractor friend can come too. Thank you so much for the invite

Just a couple of comments, 

Lender - I always recommend mine, not because I make money by it, but because he is versed in multi units and can close.  Not all agents/lenders are well versed in it and about half the time a client wants to use their own lender they drop the ball and mine needs to step in at the last minute.  I don't push the issue but I do want to talk with their lender about their experience 

Appointments - Apartment builds are harder, especially if they are tenant occupied.  It is common in my market to require at least 48 hours notice.  About half our listings only allow showings during specific time blocks, so there may be only a few hours a week we can show it.  It is also common to only be able to show some of the units on the first time too.  So add that into the fact that sometimes agents are unresponsive, and I can see where you may not get in to see everything you want.  I have a showing I have been trying to see for 2+ weeks now and the agent is just not responding to calls/texts/emails

Responsiveness - I check the MLS daily and try to contact clients first, but about half the time they reach out to me. It shows me they are serious and engaged in the process. I always respond the same day, so if they are not responding to you that is a red flag

Originally posted by @Brie Schmidt :

Just a couple of comments, 

Lender - I always recommend mine, not because I make money by it, but because he is versed in multi units and can close.  Not all agents/lenders are well versed in it and about half the time a client wants to use their own lender they drop the ball and mine needs to step in at the last minute.  I don't push the issue but I do want to talk with their lender about their experience 

Appointments - Apartment builds are harder, especially if they are tenant occupied.  It is common in my market to require at least 48 hours notice.  About half our listings only allow showings during specific time blocks, so there may be only a few hours a week we can show it.  It is also common to only be able to show some of the units on the first time too.  So add that into the fact that sometimes agents are unresponsive, and I can see where you may not get in to see everything you want.  I have a showing I have been trying to see for 2+ weeks now and the agent is just not responding to calls/texts/emails

Responsiveness - I check the MLS daily and try to contact clients first, but about half the time they reach out to me. It shows me they are serious and engaged in the process. I always respond the same day, so if they are not responding to you that is a red flag

Thank you for your perspective, Brie. I do feel like she was being a little pushy about her own lender because I communicated 3 times that I was comfortable with my lender, but I do think you brought an interesting point. I'm using USAA and they have been very good with dealing with my application and prequal and informing me on what to expect. What are the challenges you have experienced regarding lack of lender experience? Maybe it can be give me a better idea of what to be on the look out for.

It has been a common challenge to be able to coordinate with the tenants a good time which I totally understand but I do think that is disrespectful to the tenants to only give them one days notice which is why we haven't been able to see some of the places when scheduled. This post has made me understand that I shouldn't expect the realtor to do all of the leg work. If they do, that is nice but I understand that there are clients that can be flaky and so its good to see some effort on my part. My concern with her is that she said there was nothing in my price range when I found plenty that she was then able to pull up the paperwork for in Paragon. It seems dishonest. She was supposed to get back to me Wednesday about the next time we can see houses and I haven't heard anything yet. This process has been very informative though. A lot of people I've spoken to with experience selling houses suggested that I try to do FSBO but since this is my first time, I really wanted the learning experience of working with a realtor so no harm no foul. I do plan to to move on to another realtor if I don't hear from her in a couple days. That is tough for me because she is really nice, I just don't have a lot of confidence in her at this point and it she has put energy into this already.

Free eBook from BiggerPockets!

Ultimate Beginner's Guide Book Cover

Join BiggerPockets and get The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Real Estate Investing for FREE - read by more than 100,000 people - AND get exclusive real estate investing tips, tricks and techniques delivered straight to your inbox twice weekly!

  • Actionable advice for getting started,
  • Discover the 10 Most Lucrative Real Estate Niches,
  • Learn how to get started with or without money,
  • Explore Real-Life Strategies for Building Wealth,
  • And a LOT more.

Lock We hate spam just as much as you

Join the Largest Real Estate Investing Community

Basic membership is free, forever.

By signing up, you indicate that you agree to the BiggerPockets Terms & Conditions.