Investing in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

7 Replies

Hi all,

I am an active-duty Staff Sergeant (E-6) in the United States Marine Corps currently overseas and looking to start my real estate portfolio. I am single with no debts, kids or wife so I am ready to give all my 100% off-duty time available into this! 

I was born and raised in Puerto Rico, where my family currently still lives. After the hurricane I have been looking into prices to start buying properties using the BRRR method or even getting into flipping if possible. Does anyone have any experience doing this in the Puerto Rico market? How different is since Maria? Any recommendations are welcome.

V/r

L

@Luis A. Escudero Burgos My friend and I had the same insight and are considering it. We are most interested in the Aguadilla area as it had close proximity to the beach and good surf spots. I have a couple of boriqua friends that just got back so I will be tying in with them shortly. The prices were suppressed prior to the hurricane as you probably know. I don't know what kind of economic recovery and rebuilding we'll see under the Trump administration. Long term buy n hold might be a better strategy...it all depends on the boots on the ground. Google purchasing in PR. I ran across a great blog that outlined the process quite well. Not exactly how we do it here in the US. Buena suerte amigo! TJ

Following, same as OP single debt free E6 overseas. Did a little research and networking but lost interest. Willing to mastermind options tho

Originally posted by @Roger Poole :

Following, same as OP single debt free E6 overseas. Did a little research and networking but lost interest. Willing to mastermind options tho

Partnerships I heard are powerful! So I will let you know once I get a good grasp and knowledge about the area. Thanks.

V/r

Luis

Luis, as you know everything is a pain in the *** in PR, and the government has their hand out at every turn. 

i think some of the issues are that rents are not that high, and finding qualified people are difficult right now, especially when people are not working. it sucks, but its the facts.

unfortunately the properties don't appreciate well down there, so you would be buying for a long term cash flow play. 

Some of the places that are doing well down there are the short term rentals. This is the market I will buy into next year down there.

Good day Luis,

I posed a question awhile back (before Maria) in regards to interests in PR.

I have been in contact with several different people in the real estate industry and while they say it's slow moving people are selling and flipping (average turn around 6-8 months).  Not at a crazy pace but homes are being sold.   I'm looking into rebuilding communities especially those on main roads and close to attractions.

Right now I am working on assembling a team:

Real Estate Agents

Real Estate Attorneys

CPA's

General Contractors

Lenders

@Tim Jones , Many thanks for that google tip.  I'll check that blog out.

@Luis A. Escudero Burgos , stay in touch and I'll keep you posted on the progress.  The more people are interested in flipping homes in PR makes me believe the recovery can happen faster than expected.   Have to get a better grip on the tax laws and totally understand the PR home flipping system.

Stay tuned.....

JJG-

Hello, all I have been trying to start this from the states but there is a lot of resilience from bank to lend for the market in Puerto Rico.  Also, it is very different to buy property over there as you have to work with several different agents.  There is no title company, everyone has to show up to closing and other factors.  I am actually going to be personally going to PR to get current and accurate information because everyone has something different to say and I don't like run around or I don't feel I should have to pay someone for simple answers.  If you are still interested I can send what I find out.  Also, I was just there and the one thing you must keep in mind our you flipping to resell in the Puerto Rico population or to the population in the US?  I say this because many are still struggling to make end meet over there and the economy isn't that high.  On my trip I have learned that although they are welcoming tourist back because the demand for income is high they are not fully functioning.  Hotel even in San Juan are mostly on generator so no elevator service.  (I was there last week of May 2018).   

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