Real Estate Attorney Turned Investor

2 Replies

Hey all! I wanted to introduce myself. I recently left my corporate law firm (where I practiced (transactional) real estate law in CA) to pursue other interests and endeavors, one of which is investing in real estate. My fiance and I have a bit of capital to work with, but feel that we may need to look outside of CA to find good cash flow deals. My background is primarily in commercial real estate transactions, but we're interested in (eventually) acquiring a portfolio of multifamily properties. We're currently researching markets, and ingesting as much knowledge and information we can about the industry, but nothing beats primary sources.

While I'm still in the same industry, this career pivot is a bit scary and I feel like I'm at an informational deficit. For those of you with similar backgrounds, how did you get your start? Other than this wonderful sight, are there any resources you'd recommend? If you've done a lot of long distance investing, which tools did you use to lock in a market?

When investing from a distance, you need to first define criteria then examine 10 or so markets to see how they fit that criteria. Then pick the top 2-3, study them thoroughly, travel to them, and get to know your top 1-2 like the back of your hand. Tools you can use include various government entities that accumulate data (BLS, Federal Reserve, local Chambers of Commerce) and private entities like Rentometer or Costar (pricey, though).

If this is your new career, it's going to take a ton of dedication to be competitive. Just as much dedication as it took to go to Law school and become a lawyer!

Have you decided on an asset class you're targeting? What are your specific results goals and timelines for achieving them?

Originally posted by @Taylor L. :

When investing from a distance, you need to first define criteria then examine 10 or so markets to see how they fit that criteria. Then pick the top 2-3, study them thoroughly, travel to them, and get to know your top 1-2 like the back of your hand. Tools you can use include various government entities that accumulate data (BLS, Federal Reserve, local Chambers of Commerce) and private entities like Rentometer or Costar (pricey, though).

If this is your new career, it's going to take a ton of dedication to be competitive. Just as much dedication as it took to go to Law school and become a lawyer!

Have you decided on an asset class you're targeting? What are your specific results goals and timelines for achieving them?

Thank you so much for your post. This is my next career pivot, and I am willing to do the work to be competitive!!!