Want to Become CRE Broker

11 Replies

My journey of trying to start a successful business started 3 years ago when I had no clue as to what types of business opportunities existed. I've gone through trying and failing many times, but I also have experience being a general manager at 2 commercial real estate properties for several years, until I left to an acquisitions firm that Id rather not even mention on a resume.

I have been around the disruptive startup scene (did a tech startup that failed early), and I have experience in managing commercial properties. Now the picture is clear for me and I want to start a commercial brokerage either as an independent or have a small team of sales agents. I don't mind working as an associate broker to get training at a brokerage firm, but the question is how do I go about this. 

I have updated my resume, and it shows that although I don't have a college degree finished, I believe I have developed human capital more than other 24/25 year olds coming out of college, even have done successful strategic partnerships as a manager of one of the properties. 


Now here is the interesting part. My parents have a small track of land, that is adjacent to another track of vacant land. The owner has been trying to contact them, but my parents are too busy to really care since they full with work. They want to transfer the land property to my name, and are allowing me to sell or develop it. How can I leverage this situation to get into commercial real estate brokerage? It has utilities and no restrictions. I was thinking about trying to do a joint venture with the interested party, in a deal where I would not have to put down any financing. 

Thanks for all the replies. 

Search the topic as there are many questions/answers concerning getting into commercial real estate. Here's the most recent thread I know of on the topic, "Commercial RE Apprentice/Training Programs".

As for the land question, call the interested party and see what they want to do. If it sounds interesting then say you'll have to think about it. If you really do need to think about it then this will provide you the time to make an informed decision. If you find you have questions or need advice on structuring an advantageous deal then talk to whomever it is you have in your network that can help you or come back in here and seek advice through a separate question.

Should've done that first, thanks.

Hey guys a little update here:

A brokerage is interested and wants me to get started in my license education. I don't need to complete it to get the position, but they want me to at least get it started AND research tenant representation before I call them and proceed further, just to make sure that I am in the right place. 

Here is my background: I don't have a college degree, I have experience in managing hotels, and I want to get into commercial real estate brokerage, but specifically investment sales. That is my strength as I have contacts looking to invest and sell commercial property, but no experience in regards to sales process and cash flow aalysis/market research etc (something I really want to learn). 


The firm I am in contact with deals with tenant representation mostly. In my position, is it better to get my foot in the door with this tenant rep firm? I have no problems in working hard, I actually look forward to developing contacts and learning sales and negotiation skills, but eventually I do want to get into the investment sales side. 

Should I use my contacts as a pitch to see if I can get a position at a firm that does IS, or should I just take this position, considering that I don't have a degree?

I started emailing CEO's and Managing Partners of top CRE firms. A couple of them have opened my emails and have no replied back.

In the emails I am telling them I can instantly provide them clients in need of disposition services and have connections to other markets with important contacts. 

I will follow up on the emails telling them I am looking forward to a follow up discussion, but I feel really eager to just go into a firm, talk to a director or VP, offer them the listings, and ask to join the team. 

Is there a right or wrong? 

Quick question, why don't you get licensed first, it's pretty simple to get started and a minimal investment and you seem pretty motivated.

Also, if you're contacting a large cre firm, I'm guessing it's one with hundreds of agents, they most likely have someone in recruitment you can get in contact with so you don't need to go directly to the head.

Originally posted by @Martin Z. :

Quick question, why don't you get licensed first, it's pretty simple to get started and a minimal investment and you seem pretty motivated.

Also, if you're contacting a large cre firm, I'm guessing it's one with hundreds of agents, they most likely have someone in recruitment you can get in contact with so you don't need to go directly to the head.

 Yeah I am about to get started on my licensing education, I just didn't think it would have mattered too much as long as I enroll quickly after getting a broker position. 

As for approaching a recruiter... well part of my strategy was to circumvent the HR department. As I mentioned, I don't have a degree, but I do have contacts and instant asset listings I can provide. I thought this would set me apart in the eyes of a big time decision maker at a firm. 

If managers and execs dont reply back to me I will definitely try out the recruiters and exhaust every option possible. 

You keep mentioning "I don't have a degree" In real estate (please don't kill me peeps) they're pretty much worthless. Best thing do is get licensed quickly and start closing deals, that's probably the best way to go about it. As for negotiating with clients, in CA, not sure about other states, you can't do it anyways until you are licensed or unless you're working as a principle. 

Originally posted by @Martin Z. :

You keep mentioning "I don't have a degree" In real estate (please don't kill me peeps) they're pretty much worthless. Best thing do is get licensed quickly and start closing deals, that's probably the best way to go about it. As for negotiating with clients, in CA, not sure about other states, you can't do it anyways until you are licensed or unless you're working as a principle. 

Yeah sure the degree is worthless, but the HR lady doesn't think so, hence why I email it to the guys that know it's not a make it or break it type of thing if I don't have one. 

If I get licensed, I can start closing on commercial deals without working for a broker??

I'm sure there will be plenty brokers that will take you in, others can chime in on this with more experience. But most will not gift away free resources to begginers for variety of reasons. 

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