NNN Lease Without Being Accredited?

5 Replies

I am currently a student and will be commissioning into the Army next year. While my short-term goal is to start my real estate investing journey and portfolio by utilizing the benefits of the VA Loan, my longer-term goal is to get into the commercial niche of retail and industrial with NNN Leases. I understand that a lot of investors in the NNN Lease space have large amounts of liquid money assessible and are accredited investors. I have a creative strategy that I potentially plan to use down the road that will involve using the properties that I purchase with the VA Loan to free up around $500-600K in liquid money. My question is, since my W2 income will not be nearly enough, is there ANY possibility that a commercial NNN broker or bank would take a chance on an investor such as myself who has the liquid money available by is not an accredited investor? Would having a good pre-existing relationship with an unconventional bank (such as a portfolio lender) increase my chances? Or will being accredited and having liquid money give me the only possible opportunity? Thanks in advance, any response is valuable!

Blake, it's definitely possible. Make sure to check out the BP podcast with Matt Onofrio on NNN leases in commercial properties. From what he explains, banks love lending on these types of properties because of how secure they are. Remember, you also don't have to do the deal alone, you could always find a great deal and partner with someone on the first deal in order to get your feet wet, then once you're more comfortable and have money coming in from the property, go off and do it alone, or continue partnering.

Hey Blake, banks should still be willing to work with you if the deal makes sense. In looking at a NNN lease property, banks are going to initially focus on the length of the lease term remaining, the credit of the tenant, the location of the property, and the rental rate as compared to the market. Your ability to provide a substantive personal guarantee is going to be something they are going to want to see as well, but they will likely still play ball as long as you can get a decent downpayment in place and the deal still makes sense. As Landon mentions, the other option is to partner with an individual with a strong balance sheet. In the end, if a bank likes the lease terms and credit, they will probably work with you as long as you can put down a decent chunk of change for the downpayment.


Let me know if you have any other questions or need help as you begin tracking down potential investments!

Originally posted by @Landon Bleau :

Blake, it's definitely possible. Make sure to check out the BP podcast with Matt Onofrio on NNN leases in commercial properties. From what he explains, banks love lending on these types of properties because of how secure they are. Remember, you also don't have to do the deal alone, you could always find a great deal and partner with someone on the first deal in order to get your feet wet, then once you're more comfortable and have money coming in from the property, go off and do it alone, or continue partnering.

Landon, I appreciate the response. I have watched Matt Onofrio's podcast multiple times through-and-through in order to really dissect and digest the strategy that he uses and how he got started. I have been looking through the BP forums at NNN Lease post for awhile in order to assist me in becoming more knowledgeable and consistently see brokers on some of these post discussing how banks still factor in the individual and their net worth. After coming across some other podcasts that Matt appeared on, he mentioned in one of them that his W2 income when he first started investing was around $300K a year. I understand that Matt was able to come up with a strategy that is a little unorthodox in terms of getting into the first deal with no money down and making it scalable, but he was still accredited at the time of that first investment. More or less, I really just want to know if it is possible to use the same overall strategy that he used, with the exception of no money down, to get into the NNN space without partnering considering I'll be making a military salary.

 

Originally posted by @Jacob Franz :

Hey Blake, banks should still be willing to work with you if the deal makes sense. In looking at a NNN lease property, banks are going to initially focus on the length of the lease term remaining, the credit of the tenant, the location of the property, and the rental rate as compared to the market. Your ability to provide a substantive personal guarantee is going to be something they are going to want to see as well, but they will likely still play ball as long as you can get a decent downpayment in place and the deal still makes sense. As Landon mentions, the other option is to partner with an individual with a strong balance sheet. In the end, if a bank likes the lease terms and credit, they will probably work with you as long as you can put down a decent chunk of change for the downpayment.


Let me know if you have any other questions or need help as you begin tracking down potential investments!

Jacob, it is my understanding that since it would be my first commercial deal in that space, a bank would typically require a larger (60-65% LTV) down payment. Is it possible that a bank would offer 70-75% LTV on the property on a first deal if it is a bank that I have a pre-existing relationship with? Also, how difficult would it be to find a broker who would be willing to work with somebody in my situation?

 

Originally posted by @Blake Harris :
Originally posted by @Jacob Franz:

Hey Blake, banks should still be willing to work with you if the deal makes sense. In looking at a NNN lease property, banks are going to initially focus on the length of the lease term remaining, the credit of the tenant, the location of the property, and the rental rate as compared to the market. Your ability to provide a substantive personal guarantee is going to be something they are going to want to see as well, but they will likely still play ball as long as you can get a decent downpayment in place and the deal still makes sense. As Landon mentions, the other option is to partner with an individual with a strong balance sheet. In the end, if a bank likes the lease terms and credit, they will probably work with you as long as you can put down a decent chunk of change for the downpayment.


Let me know if you have any other questions or need help as you begin tracking down potential investments!

Jacob, it is my understanding that since it would be my first commercial deal in that space, a bank would typically require a larger (60-65% LTV) down payment. Is it possible that a bank would offer 70-75% LTV on the property on a first deal if it is a bank that I have a pre-existing relationship with? Also, how difficult would it be to find a broker who would be willing to work with somebody in my situation?

 

Whats your net worth? Liquid outside primary residence? Thats the flip side of income, is net worth guarantee. No lender is going to lend you 75% LTV when you have low income and no ability to repay if you mismanage the property.