Multifamily Construction Cost

6 Replies

I know that it is always best to get a contractor to tour the units, but are there any "rule of thumbs" anyone uses for upgrading units?  Here are some examples.  I know I'm asking for ball park numbers but any info would help.  If it counts for anything, I'm located in San Diego just in case construction costs vary. Also some recommendations of some good and price friendly contractors in San Diego would always be good.  Thank you in advance!

1. Cost of laying new flooring per SF (vinyl wood plank or carpet)

2. New counter tops (granite or linoleum)

3. Paint

4. Price to turnover a unit

You can just go into a Box store like Home Depot and go o each dept.  Like the flooring dept and get all your answers there amd'or the counter top dept and the Paint Department

When factoring costs, you must consider Location, Scope, Quality, Time Frame. As well as Contractor Interest, Skill and Availability.

I've heard it said "Quality-Time-Price.... pick two." Hard to get high quality, done quickly, for a low price, which is perhaps the unrealistic expectation of most people.

For some good information about rehab costs... Check out @J Scott 's Rehab Analysis Spreadsheet available under the BP File Place.

Marcia Maynard, Fischer Properties | Podcast Guest on Show #83

I"m interested in this spreadsheet...where is the BP file place?

Originally posted by @Jordan Concepcion :

I know that it is always best to get a contractor to tour the units, but are there any "rule of thumbs" anyone uses for upgrading units?  Here are some examples.  I know I'm asking for ball park numbers but any info would help.  If it counts for anything, I'm located in San Diego just in case construction costs vary. Also some recommendations of some good and price friendly contractors in San Diego would always be good.  Thank you in advance!

1. Cost of laying new flooring per SF (vinyl wood plank or carpet)

2. New counter tops (granite or linoleum)

3. Paint

4. Price to turnover a unit

 The upper price of J Scott's book seems pretty fair to me, a little bit low on what I charge, but I only schedule investors to fill up the gap between commercial/government contracts, not that I won't finish on time and on budget nor will not finish the job once started. To answer your question, carpet is usually $2-3/sf, countertop is around 500-800/slab, paint is around 2-3/sf given low litigation/repair work. price to turn over, I don't get what this exactly means.

@Jordan Concepcion Hais painting in San Diego came in at and exterior paint of $2.25 sq/ft google for contact info. He is fast and does not skimp on prep work. Paint is all in the prep. He is hard to understand.