Help with first development project

2 Replies

My partner owns land outright in Edmond, OK.  The property is in a very desirable area with a strong market and limited multifamily.  We are looking into developing the land into multifamily (quads or duplexes), but have never done this type of project.  I found that the property resides in an unincorporated area with no zoning requirements, but city water and utilities can be accessed.

Not knowing where to begin we are hoping for guidance on steps.  Needing to understand;

1) best way to get build plans and find a reputable small multi family builder?

2) determination of where/how to get utility lines run for the buildings (water, sewer, electric, gas)?

3) without zoning restrictions how do we determine best unit fit for property?

4) contracting with a builder - are there generic contracts to start with and have a lawyer alter to fit?

Thanks for any help and guidance!!

Hi @Chris H

I'm a broker in Edmond.  Without knowing exactly where the property is (or more importantly how it's zoned), this might be a bit of a generic answer.  I see you mentioned that the land is unincorporated, so I'm assuming it's outside of city limits so the governing municipality would be the county.  There is a big difference in process of Oklahoma county (south of Waterloo) and Logan county (north of Waterloo).

1- If you are building quads or duplexes, there are a few local builders that we know that would love to take on the project.  

2 & 3 - These go together.  I'm going to assume that the land is unplatted, so survey work and engineering work would need to be done to determine the best fit that also complies with local municipal codes and guidelines.  This work would show streets, lots, water mitigation, and utilities easements.  With an initial proposal, you can start the process of attempting to get it rezoned.  The City of Edmond, for example, does a great job with their city planning and protecting the long term property values, so be prepared to make adjustments to the original plan. 

4 - Most of the local builder have contracts that can be used, although we'd always recommend having your attorney review the documents. 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

I've waded off into those waters before, although in an area that was incorporated so there was much more red tape(i.e. money). It's a much more complicated process than I care to get into with a blog post, but if you are seriously considering I would be more than happy to have a phone conversation with you about it.

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