HOW TO FIGURE OUT WHO EMPLOYS MOST OF MARKET

12 Replies

Hey guys,

I feel like I have a general understanding of largest employers in my prospective markets, but I think what I am truly looking for is WHO EMPLOYS A MAJORITY OF MY MARKET AND KEEPS ECONOMY GOING?

For example, if I am considering about investing in suburb "A" who's largest employer is a grocery store, but in reality most of residents in that town commute to City "B" that is only 2 miles away which has a major university and hospital.

How would I research and figure this out? 

Originally posted by @Antoine Martel :

You can find this on BLS.gov

 Thank you. I have been trying to look for this information on BLS website. All I see is top industries , not necessarily top employers who employ most of residents and support economy in particular area (what I am looking for).Would you mind showing me where exactly on website will I find this information?

It's going to be difficult to find that information neighborhood by neighborhood.

Because in one neighborhood there could be people commuting all different types of distances. There is no way to tell the flow of people from one neighborhood to another. But it will be important to see the locations of all the companies.

@Jason Ma Finding information by neighborhood is useless and misleading. Folks commute between neighborhoods, areas and cities. A big employer locally might not be employing local employees or vice-versa. 

This level of granularity would not be very useful unless you are investing very small markets with little or no movement. You run the risk of being precisely wrong as opposed to approximately right.

Originally posted by @Antoine Martel :

It's going to be difficult to find that information neighborhood by neighborhood.

Because in one neighborhood there could be people commuting all different types of distances. There is no way to tell the flow of people from one neighborhood to another. But it will be important to see the locations of all the companies.

So what is the rule of thumb of how far the big employers be from the town you're investing in? 

Originally posted by @Omar Khan :

@Jason Ma Finding information by neighborhood is useless and misleading. Folks commute between neighborhoods, areas and cities. A big employer locally might not be employing local employees or vice-versa. 

This level of granularity would not be very useful unless you are investing very small markets with little or no movement. You run the risk of being precisely wrong as opposed to approximately right.

 So are you saying as long as the county has an "economic anchor" and jobs are. growing then you're good? If so, what if you're considering in investing between 2 towns in same county?

Originally posted by @Jason Ma:
Originally posted by @Antoine Martel:

It's going to be difficult to find that information neighborhood by neighborhood.

Because in one neighborhood there could be people commuting all different types of distances. There is no way to tell the flow of people from one neighborhood to another. But it will be important to see the locations of all the companies.

So what is the rule of thumb of how far the big employers be from the town you're investing in? 

The closer the better. 

Originally posted by @Jason Ma:
Originally posted by @Omar Khan:

@Jason Ma Finding information by neighborhood is useless and misleading. Folks commute between neighborhoods, areas and cities. A big employer locally might not be employing local employees or vice-versa. 

This level of granularity would not be very useful unless you are investing very small markets with little or no movement. You run the risk of being precisely wrong as opposed to approximately right.

 So are you saying as long as the county has an "economic anchor" and jobs are. growing then you're good? If so, what if you're considering in investing between 2 towns in same county?

Type of job growth, demographics, industry diversification. 

I wrote an extensive article on devising a deal screening checklist. It is a soup-to-nuts guide on how to approach this topic. 

Let me know if you need anything.

Why does it have to done from a  keyboard?  Going to the neighborhood/city/county to observe and talk with people will provide the information needed to make good decisions.  

Originally posted by @Antoine Martel :
Originally posted by @Jason Ma:
Originally posted by @Antoine Martel:

It's going to be difficult to find that information neighborhood by neighborhood.

Because in one neighborhood there could be people commuting all different types of distances. There is no way to tell the flow of people from one neighborhood to another. But it will be important to see the locations of all the companies.

So what is the rule of thumb of how far the big employers be from the town you're investing in? 

The closer the better. 

 thank you

Originally posted by @Stephen Masek :

Why does it have to done from a  keyboard?  Going to the neighborhood/city/county to observe and talk with people will provide the information needed to make good decisions.  

 All my markets are out of state. Try to cut down my options to 1-3

Originally posted by @Omar Khan :
Originally posted by @Jason Ma:
Originally posted by @Omar Khan:

@Jason Ma Finding information by neighborhood is useless and misleading. Folks commute between neighborhoods, areas and cities. A big employer locally might not be employing local employees or vice-versa. 

This level of granularity would not be very useful unless you are investing very small markets with little or no movement. You run the risk of being precisely wrong as opposed to approximately right.

 So are you saying as long as the county has an "economic anchor" and jobs are. growing then you're good? If so, what if you're considering in investing between 2 towns in same county?

Type of job growth, demographics, industry diversification. 

I wrote an extensive article on devising a deal screening checklist. It is a soup-to-nuts guide on how to approach this topic. 

Let me know if you need anything.

 Will read thanks

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