Land Investing Education

16 Replies

Hello, Everyone!

I am interested in learning more about investing in raw land.  Does anyone have any suggestions about educational materials or online classes that worked well for them?  I know Mark Podolsky has some good information out there, but are there other companies that provide comparable educational material?  

Thanks for your advice!

James

I would be interested in this info as well.

Account Closed what peaks your interest on type of investment? 

There are three main educators I've heard about in this space (I'm sure there are more, but these are the ones I know of):

1. @Seth Williams has a ton of great (free!) information on his site, www.retipster.com. He was on BP podcast #39 and has his own podcast now. He also has a paid course you can go through to get more in depth info than what is on the website. 

2. Mark Podolsky aka The Land Geek. He has a podcast and paid training, too. He's also been interviewed on a lot of other podcasts. Personally, he comes off as a bit more guru-ish to me, but that could just be because of the way he markets himself. 

3. Land Academy These guys have been in the land business for a long time. They also have a podcast and paid training. The land investing forum they host is free though. 

Each of the 3 has a bit of a different spin on land investing, so if you are looking for different approaches, it may not hurt to check out the free resources each has to offer and see what fits better for you. 

Account Closed Welcome! I'm just getting started in this space too and would love to share ideas and thoughts as I get going with trying to find deals to analyze. PM me any time you like

@Hai Loc I am primarily interested in it because of its low acquisition cost and impression that there is generally less competition. I think it could be a good way to get started with my investing career.
Originally posted by Account Closed:
@Hai Loc I am primarily interested in it because of its low acquisition cost and impression that there is generally less competition. I think it could be a good way to get started with my investing career.+

Here are a few things I would like to add

Unless you have a plan to improve the land whether its rezoning, plat it so you can build on it etc..  You will likely have to hang on to the land or an extended period of time.  

If you are the patient type then by all means try this to start your investing career.. 

You can have "less competition" when you buy and also when you sell.. So it goes both ways. So your strategy going in is you know you money will be sitting there for a while vs a rental where it is a bit more liquid than land.. 

In some respects, investing in land is easy, but in other ways it can be trickier than buying income producing assets.  First off, keep in mind that land is not income producing and, if you do it right, it is not a passive investment.  Know why you are buying a particular piece of property.  What is the highest and best use?  (subdivision, industrial, retail, office, etc.)  Then, compare that to the existing entitlements and if they don't match up, learn what it will take to get the entitlements you need.  You will also want to carefully review title and survey to make sure there are no existing encumbrances that will negatively affect the use of the property.  Make sure you budget for future expenses during your hold, including taxes, insurance, legal, engineering, etc.  If you are buying a large parcel and plan on selling off individual lots, you will typically have to plat the site and bring utilities and access to the piece you are selling.

I hear stories all the time of people buying a piece of land and finding out after the fact they can't use it for what they envisioned.  It's a lot cheaper to do your homework before you buy.

Originally posted by @Jeff Ledyard :

In some respects, investing in land is easy, but in other ways it can be trickier than buying income producing assets.  First off, keep in mind that land is not income producing and, if you do it right, it is not a passive investment.  Know why you are buying a particular piece of property.  What is the highest and best use?  (subdivision, industrial, retail, office, etc.)  Then, compare that to the existing entitlements and if they don't match up, learn what it will take to get the entitlements you need.  You will also want to carefully review title and survey to make sure there are no existing encumbrances that will negatively affect the use of the property.  Make sure you budget for future expenses during your hold, including taxes, insurance, legal, engineering, etc.  If you are buying a large parcel and plan on selling off individual lots, you will typically have to plat the site and bring utilities and access to the piece you are selling.

I hear stories all the time of people buying a piece of land and finding out after the fact they can't use it for what they envisioned.  It's a lot cheaper to do your homework before you buy.

Jeff

Its sad the stories I hear of real estate agents representing their wealthy clients with blatant lies stating they can build subdivisions when they cannot. Burning millions having sellers getting away with murder. 

I wouldn't trust anyone but yourself. Hours of due diligence pays off

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