What is the most under realized opportunity in real estate today?

147 Replies

Originally posted by @John DeFrancesco :

@Dallas Hayden

You think this way because of the massive evictions coming down the pipeline storage units are going to be a big hit? Could make plenty of sense.

My industrial land has been doing well. I started poking around in N Texas and it appears that industrial is fairly hot but not white hot like residential has been. Still some headroom left there IMO.  

Originally posted by @Bob Wilson :
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:
Originally posted by @Tony Kim:
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

Forgot to put the picture of the house that just sold in Torrance California'

 Come one Jack, you and I both know that this property is hardly representative of Torrance. This location is in one of the worst parts of Torrance and if were located near the courthouse it would be well over a million. Anywhere past Anza and we'd be talking 1.5M. I know this because my wife have been combing the neighborhood looking for a new house to buy.

Also, we both know that prices have shot up tremendously since 2001. I don't think anyone here is naive enough to believe Torrance SFR prices are the same from 21 years ago.

I concede! After doing a lot of research, the statements I made are not correct and it appears that property values increased by about 30% to 50% since 2001. At least according to what I see. I looked at a history of the Trust Deeds for homes near the Torrance courthouse and I could not find any homes that sold for near $1 million and every home I looked at appeared to have an increase in value of 30% to 50% since 2001.

I use a propertyradar.com to do a lot of research for properties and the amount of information you can get from this website is amazing. I showed what the website does to two brokers and they both subscribed to it, immediately, because the website give more information faster than the websites licensed brokers use and the cost is only $79 per month.

The website gives the name of the current owner of the property, date and price paid, a history of past owners, list of all the Trust Deeds, names of lenders and all you need to do is click on a button to get copies of trust deeds, liens, and whatever.

I don't want to spend a lot of time, but the search capabilities is super amazing and you will never find a website that can do what propertyradar.com does. I suggest anyone serious about investing should have a good look at this website. I use it for my plumbing and construction business every day because before I sign a contract with a customer I want to make sure the person signing is the actual owner of the property and then I use it all the time to check the spelling of their names.

For searching for houses to flip the search capabilities is unbelievable and there are even searches where you can pull up a list of all the houses one flipper flips. So, if you sell services to flippers this is the website you need. If you flip houses this website gives you a good idea exactly how well other flippers are doing because it tells you the price flippers paid and how much they sold the houses for. If you want to buy foreclosures then this is the website to use. It will search for foreclosures with the specifics you want, but I use auction.com and one other website to find foreclosures and I use propertyradar.com to get the current owner's name, their loan balance and the best comp to know the ARV.

Per their web-site -

Property radar has email/phone number data too Jack?

propertyradar.com does give personal information e.g. email, phone, property owner's address, etc., but I don't have a clue regarding how accurate the information is nor do I know if you can generate a large batch of properties at the same time.

I just searched my own name to see what came up and the information is totally not correct because there are several people who have the exact same name as I do and the results show properties in other states I do not own. The results did not show my phone number, email address, nor even my mailing address and it showed properties I sold 18 months ago and is showed properties I gifted to my children 3 years ago.

I don't think the lack of the correct mailing address, phone, email, etc. is a problem with propertyradar.com. The problem is that that is the way the information works with all websites that do searches because that is the best way any information can be pulled from public records. NOT SURE!

I been using another website for many years called parcelquest.com and I pay $99 per month. I think the company is very small, but we use it because it works at lightning speed compared to propertyradar.com and I the website does not show the phone number or email address and it does not generate a bulk list. I have a database with 150,000 customers and every few months my database generate a list of about 400 to 500 records where we need to use parcelquest.com to verify whether or not our customers still own the properties we list in our database and we check the spelling of their name, spelling of their address. city name and zip code to make sure that when we do a direct mail campaign all the information we have is correct so we don't look like idiots. We look up one homeowner's addredd at a time, but the software works fast.

To collect a bulk of 10,000 to 1 million property owner's names to call on the phone, to collect a bulk of email addresses and to limit your lists to search results e.g. only single family homeowners with specifics e.g. how much equity they have, loan balance etc. or to search for apartment building owners. etc. this company has super cheap priced and all sorts of discounts for larger batches and the information is as correct as it can be with errors due to the mercy of what can be drawn from public records.

A cannot remember the name of this company right now and I am not at my office. I developed my own fairly sophisticated software programs that streamlines importing thousands of records into my database and then it creates mailing lists, or lists of phone numbers, email addresses and the software gives me the ability manage whatever I want to  do, very easily.

Here is the problem with any mailing list I ever purchase from any company and I've been purchasing mailing lists going as far back as 1973 when the lists came only as a list on paper, or labels to paste on envelopes.

The problem I sncounter with mailing lists is we will send 20,000 to 50,000 very nice letters customized with the property owners proper salutation on the letter and usually get zero responses, or maybe 1 or 2 responses that don't pan out. That is a lot of money to spend for such a large cost for envelopes, stamps and the labor to stuff the envelopes.

For telephone campaigns, my software will eliminated all the records that do not have phone numbers and the software allows the telemarketer to document the results for each phone call. The problem we encounter is we know for a fact that the phone numbers in our database are valid phone numbers that are in service, but our telemarketers would make phone calls for a solid 8 hours for 2 or 3 days and nobody in this world answers their phones and we get is 'leave a voicemail. I've had professional telemarketers attempt to get appointments for many different types of services and products and that is a hard and expensive way to go. At least that was always my results and maybe it is just not my forte.

I will post the name of the company that sells lists when I get back to my office. My brain is not thinking clearly right now. I found this company on BP a few years ago, I think.

I am the type person who doesn't mind paying $49 to about $100 to test differenc companies like propertyradar.com and I've tested at least 20 and found that propertyradar.com works the best for what I want and will never bother to change, but everyone has their own idea of what is better.

Originally posted by @Jack Orthman :
Originally posted by @Tony Kim:
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

Forgot to put the picture of the house that just sold in Torrance California

 Come one Jack, you and I both know that this property is hardly representative of Torrance. This location is in one of the worst parts of Torrance and if were located near the courthouse it would be well over a million. Anywhere past Anza and we'd be talking 1.5M. I know this because my wife have been combing the neighborhood looking for a new house to buy.

Also, we both know that prices have shot up tremendously since 2001. I don't think anyone here is naive enough to believe Torrance SFR prices are the same from 21 years ago.

Judging by your profile the appearance of your age in your profile picture and your stating you have 5 years experience in the real estate business you are not qualified to make a guess in regards to how much properties were selling for in the cluster of homes across the street from the courthouse. I've been purchasing real estate in Torrance since 1973, more than 48 years. I am a plumbing repair contractor and I installed new water piping , drains and sewers in about 20% of all the homes in the city of Torrance because I started my business in the city of Torrance in 1973 from a rented apartment at 17575 Yukon Avenue APT E. 

Attached, is an image showing a property for sale at 911 Hickory Avenue in the cluster of homes across from the Torrance courthouse. As I stated, houses were selling for this price or more back in 2001. The houses continued to increase in price until 2008 when the market crashed and the prices are either equal to, or a little less than their 2001 prices and this indicates that housing prices did not keep up with multi-unit properties that increased in value by 400% to 800%.

Even if I am a little wrong you will not find a significant difference in my claim e.g. it is not significant if those 1200 sw ft houses were selling for $750,000 to $850,000. Even if that is true their increase in value is nothing compared to multi-units. We need to find some charts, or some proof for actual sales going back to 2001, 2004 (I think I posted), or any date prior to 2008.

I did not median prices in Torrance were $900k to $1 million. I mentioned the average prices near the court house. There were homes in Torrance in the $1.5 to maybe the $2 million range and I feel confident when I say that many, or a nojority of the homes have not recovered to 2001 prices, or even if they did increase to above 2001 prices the increase is insignificant.

Look at price history of the above listing at 911 Hickory Ave. 90503. It sold for $335,000 in 2001 and is now valued by Zillow at 3x that and would likely sell for more than Zillow estimate....

Originally posted by @Bob Wilson :
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:
Originally posted by @Tony Kim:
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

Forgot to put the picture of the house that just sold in Torrance California

Property radar has email/phone number data too Jack?

The name of the company I use for bulk email addresses, phone numbers and the names of homeowners or property owners is https://services.datazapp.com

This company charges only 3 cents per record and I think the company is a 1-horse family-owned operation and they always offer very large discounts for larger quantities.

As with any list you purchase from any company, there is a very significant amount of inaccuracy with every company and this is an expectation that we businesses have to deal with. Example. When we get a list we expect that 50% of the results will not have a phone number, not have an email address, the phone number is no longer in service, or the email address has been changed, or the property owner is deceased and the heir to the property never recorded the change of ownership, or the property owner used to live at the address on the record, but moved and the move was not recorded on the county records. Those are the problems you need to deal with for any list you purchase from any company. That is why I created my own software to streamline sorting through and dealing with records and people who know how to use Excel can do a decent job, but never as accurate and streamlined as something similar to a MS Access 2003 database application.

Look at price history of the above listing at 911 Hickory Ave. 90503. It sold for $335,000 in 2001 and is now valued by Zillow at 3x that and would likely sell for more than Zillow estimate....

I hear exactly what you are saying, but this is somehow making me feel like something went wrong with 'time' in my life.

While Zillow states that the house at 911 Hickory sold for $335,000 in 2001, perhaps you can explain this image from propertyradar.com where my wild guess is that the buyer paid $335,000 for the house, but took out two loans for $195,000 plus $2240,000 plus $50,000 = $820,000. If you consider that banks were loaning on 70% of the value of the house then the value of the house around 2001 should have been $1,0666,000 to get a 70%  loans totaling $820,000.

Incidentally, this image is from propertyradar.com and it is the only website I know of where you can click on a little box next to these records and actually print these Trust Deeds and transactions, instantly, for $5 (I think), plus this website tracks the status of the auction dates, etc. This is a powerful website that everyone should check out.

One more thing that is not clear is the image says the LTV is only 42%. Is the $335,000 the price paid for the house or the loan amount? I am guessing the house sold for $335,000 but can't understand why the LTV is listed when I don't see the LTV listed with other properties and how did the buyer get so many loans if the value was $335,000.

Perhaps, someone can explain what these transactions mean and what the true value of this house was in 2007. It is my understanding that this house sold for $665,000 and it is currently worth $997,000 today meaning the house increase in value by 50% in the past 14 years and if I am correct I need to 'rub in in' and say that 50% in nothing compared to multi-unit properties that increased 300% to 800%.

Regardless, if someone can determine all these Trust Deeds, loans, or whatever they are it would be nice to learn something. As stated many times, I don't know a lot when it comes to understanding these things and wish there was some sort of course where I could learn these things for when I go to auctions to see what is what and whether or not I am buying the property, or buying some sort of junior lien.

I am guessing that the value of this property is much more than $665,000 if the new owner took out multiple loans and did not exceed 70% of the value of the property.

First inage

Sorry, but I cannot figure out how to put more than one image on a post.

Thank you very much.

Originally posted by @Jack Orthman :

One more thing that is not clear is the image says the LTV is only 42%. Is the $335,000 the price paid for the house or the loan amount? I am guessing the house sold for $335,000 but can't understand why the LTV is listed when I don't see the LTV listed with other properties and how did the buyer get so many loans if the value was $335,000.

If you compare to the columns to its immediate left, you can see that the first line is for the amount and the second line is for how much of that amount they borrowed to purchase. Following that logic, you can see that the Doc # and the record date. Also, 42% is not the LTV...it's how much they are putting down. The rows immediately below are a record of the loan transaction. The LTV is actually 58% and borrowed from ABN.

Originally posted by @Tony Kim :
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

One more thing that is not clear is the image says the LTV is only 42%. Is the $335,000 the price paid for the house or the loan amount? I am guessing the house sold for $335,000 but can't understand why the LTV is listed when I don't see the LTV listed with other properties and how did the buyer get so many loans if the value was $335,000.

If you compare to the columns to its immediate left, you can see that the first line is for the amount and the second line is for how much of that amount they borrowed to purchase. Following that logic, you can see that the Doc # and the record date. Also, 42% is not the LTV...it's how much they are putting down. The rows immediately below are a record of the loan transaction. The LTV is actually 58% and borrowed from ABN.

Thank you very much. I still need to study all the different types of transactions because I can't understand exactly what is going on. For myself, it gets confusing when property owners pay one loan to get another loan, or pay a portion of a loan. There are properties I pulled up on Hickory since 2001 that transferred for zero money, $20,000, etc. and that certainly does not indicate the value of the properties when they transferred. I don't feel confidence in any way where I could purchase a property without having a title company tell me the status of everything.

Originally posted by @Gebson Pinheiro :

@Jack Orthman, I see your multi-unit properties and I raise you vacation rental properties. After mortgage, taxes, management fees, and maintenance, my cash flow is 3x my expenses the first year.

That is great. It sounds sort of like you have invested your time in something great that is working out well for you. You have to post your formula (ingredients) that make your investments successful. Or, as someone once told me, "don't cook your golden goose". I love that one and imagine a goose that lays golden eggs and the family is hungry and decides to eat the goose. But, of course, I hope that people understand that it means that you should not tell your competitors your secrets reasons why you are successful.

Originally posted by @Jack Orthman :

Purchase 28 units in 2001 for $1,950,000. Value today is 28 X $320,000 per unit = $8,960,000 plus the properties are paid off and my cashflow is currently about $45,000 per month after expenses, but when I had a mortgage two years ago I my cashflow was still more than $100,000 per year. So if we take an average of $70,000 per year for cashflow in 20 years I netter $8,960,000 - $1,950,000 = $7,010.000 plus 20 years of cashflow = 20 x $70,000 = $1,400,000 + $7,010,000 = $8,410,000 or I earned 431% on the total amount I paid for the property plus a lot of other tax benefits.

I'll admit, I stopped reading your novels after this post.  While multifamily certainly has it's pros/cons, It is not necessarily the be all end all investment strategy.  For example your raving about how you grew your 1.95m in a 20 year timespan is far from impressive.  That gain comes out to a relatively meager 8.71% annualized return.  A solid investment for sure, but that's basically what you would have gotten had you just sunk your 1.95m into the stock market over those 20yrs.


As for the OP's post about what is the most under realized opportunity, I would say its a toss up between STR and rent by room methods (which includes house hacking your primary residence).

People are quickly catching on to just how profitable STR rentals can be. Depending on location, the average monthly income can often 2x or more what you could otherwise collect if instead you had rented it out on a long term basis. 2x'ing your income obviously significantly changes the long term projected ROI on single family homes. The drawback being that it often requires managing cleaning services and has a much higher initial startup cost since you're going to need to fully furnish the STR with high enough quality furniture that won't easily get destroyed. This additional upfront cost of furniture greatly increases the total down payment funds necessary to get up and running with a new rental.

The alternative best option in my opinion, is to buy 4-5 bedroom houses and rent by the room.  Select a home near the entertainment district or college campuses that is nice but simple and not easily destroyed (no carpet, instead use a sturdy laminate/tile ect).  This can also often roughly 2x the income of what a house could otherwise generate had it instead been rented to one family long term.  It has the added benefit of not needing to furnish the house, but does have the drawback of requiring more time finding/screening tenants as now you have 5x the tenants you previously had.  While scaling a rent by the room business to dozens or hundreds of properties can be difficult due to the time consuming nature of constantly screening tenants, it can be a fantastic way for most people to get their foot in the door with investing in real estate.  And since I would guess 90%+ of BP members never own more than 2 rentals, this can be a great way to maximize their funds.

Originally posted by @Jack Orthman :

Look at price history of the above listing at 911 Hickory Ave. 90503. It sold for $335,000 in 2001 and is now valued by Zillow at 3x that and would likely sell for more than Zillow estimate....

I hear exactly what you are saying, but this is somehow making me feel like something went wrong with 'time' in my life.

While Zillow states that the house at 911 Hickory sold for $335,000 in 2001, perhaps you can explain this image from propertyradar.com where my wild guess is that the buyer paid $335,000 for the house, but took out two loans for $195,000 plus $2240,000 plus $50,000 = $820,000. If you consider that banks were loaning on 70% of the value of the house then the value of the house around 2001 should have been $1,0666,000 to get a 70%  loans totaling $820,000.

Incidentally, this image is from propertyradar.com and it is the only website I know of where you can click on a little box next to these records and actually print these Trust Deeds and transactions, instantly, for $5 (I think), plus this website tracks the status of the auction dates, etc. This is a powerful website that everyone should check out.

If you go to California’s tax assessor website you can see that the property was reassessed for tax purposes at the time of the 2001 sale at a price of $335,000 as a result in change of ownership- same as purchase price.

Originally posted by @Ben Zimmerman :
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

Purchase 28 units in 2001 for $1,950,000. Value today is 28 X $320,000 per unit = $8,960,000 plus the properties are paid off and my cashflow is currently about $45,000 per month after expenses, but when I had a mortgage two years ago I my cashflow was still more than $100,000 per year. So if we take an average of $70,000 per year for cashflow in 20 years I netter $8,960,000 - $1,950,000 = $7,010.000 plus 20 years of cashflow = 20 x $70,000 = $1,400,000 + $7,010,000 = $8,410,000 or I earned 431% on the total amount I paid for the property plus a lot of other tax benefits.

I'll admit, I stopped reading your novels after this post.  While multifamily certainly has it's pros/cons, It is not necessarily the be all end all investment strategy.  For example your raving about how you grew your 1.95m in a 20 year timespan is far from impressive.  That gain comes out to a relatively meager 8.71% annualized return.  A solid investment for sure, but that's basically what you would have gotten had you just sunk your 1.95m into the stock market over those 20yrs.


As for the OP's post about what is the most under realized opportunity, I would say its a toss up between STR and rent by room methods (which includes house hacking your primary residence).

People are quickly catching on to just how profitable STR rentals can be. Depending on location, the average monthly income can often 2x or more what you could otherwise collect if instead you had rented it out on a long term basis. 2x'ing your income obviously significantly changes the long term projected ROI on single family homes. The drawback being that it often requires managing cleaning services and has a much higher initial startup cost since you're going to need to fully furnish the STR with high enough quality furniture that won't easily get destroyed. This additional upfront cost of furniture greatly increases the total down payment funds necessary to get up and running with a new rental.

The alternative best option in my opinion, is to buy 4-5 bedroom houses and rent by the room.  Select a home near the entertainment district or college campuses that is nice but simple and not easily destroyed (no carpet, instead use a sturdy laminate/tile ect).  This can also often roughly 2x the income of what a house could otherwise generate had it instead been rented to one family long term.  It has the added benefit of not needing to furnish the house, but does have the drawback of requiring more time finding/screening tenants as now you have 5x the tenants you previously had.  While scaling a rent by the room business to dozens or hundreds of properties can be difficult due to the time consuming nature of constantly screening tenants, it can be a fantastic way for most people to get their foot in the door with investing in real estate.  And since I would guess 90%+ of BP members never own more than 2 rentals, this can be a great way to maximize their funds.

Sorry, but your numbers are way off. I took $2.4 million and turned it into $36 million in 17 years = $2.117.647 return on my money and while a person did not need any brains, like I don't have, there are many people in California who did exactly the same as I did with NO THINKING, NO BRAINS, NO CONSTANT MANAGEMENT OF SHORT TERM RENTALS.

I don't know how you do your math, but I'll kiss your buns if you can get me an average annual return in the stock market that is more than 5% with all the ups and downs, the 2000 to 2001 crisis and the February to March 2020 crisis, but I will be super generous to you and assume you are some sort of genius and you got me 8% by investing in the stock market.

I will produce 2  charts. I will kiss my own buns if I could get 6% for $2.4 million for 17 years I would earn $ 6,462,654.69

If your genius stock choices produced 8%, I would earn.$ 8,880,043.33

That is a far cry from the 8.7% you claim and the $36,000,000 I earned compared to your $8,880.043.33.

As for all the people like you, who are claiming they can earn more money than what I preach for investing in real estate, there is a HUGE DIFFERENCE between INVESTING IN REAL ESTATE and RUNNING SOME SORT OF BUSINESS.

Purchasing a 4-plex, 10 units 20-unit, or 80 units is SIMPLE REAL ESTATE INVESTING. A person purchase a property, makes a few repairs, collects the rents and pays the bills. IT IS THAT SIMPLE! There are very few inherited risks and even people from other countries, who don't speak our language and were unfortunate to not get even 1 year of schooling can purchase multi-unit properties and they can be successful.

So, people keep bashing me by trying to tell me they have OTHER TYPES OF INVESTMENTS, NOT REAL ESTATE that are more successful. Purchasing short term rentals is a business that comes with many inherited risks e.g. the rules and regulations are constantly changing and a person can easily end up with a property where the city bans short term rentals, or where the cities require a hotel tax where you have to pay 10% or more of your booty to the city. You have to constantly look for new tenants, clean the properties inside and outside every time a guest moves in or out and there is not much difference between running a short term hotel that a short term rental where you have to provide 24/ service and I rented short term rentals before. 

I rented a short term rental and the water pipes were froze when I moved in. I had no water. I called the property management company. It was a holiday weekend, I had no water and about 6 to 8 guests in the house. The television did not work and then it was about 20 degrees outside and the forced air furnace stopped working. Now, the owner of the property needs to be called on a holiday weekend because I'm paying about $2400 to rent this place for a week and I want service. Luckily, for the owner, I am a plumber and HVAC contractor. So, I went to some crappy store, purchased a few tools and was able to get everything to work.

You can say a multi-unit owner has the same problems, but that is not true because we don't have tenants moving into a unit every day with 3 or 4 major problems. When you own multi-unit properties and a furnace stops working most of our tenants understand and wait a few days, but we never get a tenant where three things are broke at the same time and I've personally encountered short term rentals with multiple problems.

Here is the difference. People either want to invest in real estate that is simple to understand and simple to manage, or that want to GET INTO SOME SORT OF BUSINESS THAT REQUIRES CONSTANT FEEDING, CONSTANT MANAGEMENT AND A POETHORA OF INHERENT RISKS.

The difference between short term rentals is YOU ARE NOT GUARANTEED AN INCOME WITH SHORT TERM RENTALS.
'Poop Happens' Do you know how that applies to short term rentals. A person listens to you and their greed overbears their brains so that they don't need to think about one thing This guy told them they can make 3 times the money with short term rentals.

Five years down 'poop happens' and their short term rental empire starts to fall apart. I don't need to give you reasons, but will fabricate some, anyway. The property owners get tired, they get old and don't want to do the daily management, their rental agencies do a bad job, or just piain rip them off, the distance is too far, ordinances change.

What is the difference with just plain rental units. The rent is guaranteed. Daily management is not guaranteed. Any idiot can collect the rents, raise the rents and call a contractor for repairs. It is easier to find a property management company and you don't have to pay a management company nowhere near as much as a company that has to manage your short term rental 24/7 x 365 days per year. 

Sorry, but I think you are insane for even suggesting that the stock market could beat my investing. 

Most people want to invest in real estate and the majority of people don't want to start a full-blown business where they have to do 24/7 management, advertising for guests, dealing with management companies 24/ doing constant and more accounting, collecting many more random payments dealing with the problems and worries that come with the dates their units are available, changing dates when guests either move their dates, forward, backwards and cancel and dealing with taking down payments, collecting the balance, giving refunds and one of the biggest problem with short term rentals is worrying about bad reviews.

KISS "

Keep It Simple Stupid"

Originally posted by @Jack Orthman :
Originally posted by @Bob Wilson:
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:
Originally posted by @Tony Kim:
Originally posted by @Jack Orthman:

Forgot to put the picture of the house that just sold in Torrance California

Property radar has email/phone number data too Jack?

The name of the company I use for bulk email addresses, phone numbers and the names of homeowners or property owners is https://services.datazapp.com

This company charges only 3 cents per record and I think the company is a 1-horse family-owned operation and they always offer very large discounts for larger quantities.

As with any list you purchase from any company, there is a very significant amount of inaccuracy with every company and this is an expectation that we businesses have to deal with. Example. When we get a list we expect that 50% of the results will not have a phone number, not have an email address, the phone number is no longer in service, or the email address has been changed, or the property owner is deceased and the heir to the property never recorded the change of ownership, or the property owner used to live at the address on the record, but moved and the move was not recorded on the county records. Those are the problems you need to deal with for any list you purchase from any company. That is why I created my own software to streamline sorting through and dealing with records and people who know how to use Excel can do a decent job, but never as accurate and streamlined as something similar to a MS Access 2003 database application.



@Jack Orthman:

When I see homes for rent, I ALWAYS go through the agent. However, If I wanted to flyer those owners instead (different strategy), based on your experience which web-site would give the most accurate address, and/or phone number.

I understand all the sites issue only 50% accuracy rates, but which site would you lead with...
I read your analysis, and I believe you would say "PropertyRadar", but I want to be sure before I spend the funds, and test it.

Side note: Why is my tagging (@ ....) not working?? not sure what I'm doing wrong..

@Jack Orthman

Or…he heard you say that you would “travel to Asia to pick up a ‘mail order’ bride”…and figured, this sucker doesn’t get it. 🤣

💡 “Hey Jack! Have I got some property to sell YOU!”

Sorry Jack. I’m totally jk. I thought your story was funny but I couldn’t resist the easy set up.

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