What is the broker's relationship like with new agents?

7 Replies

I am starting the license course, and will be ready to start finding a broker to work with by the beginning of the year.

1. How does the broker dole out leads that walk into the door? Suppose a person just walks into a Century 21 to start looking for a house, how does the broker decide who gets that lead?


2. How much does the broker control, or limit, the online marketing of their agents? Are agents allowed to funnel traffic to their own website instead of their broker's?

3. There is a lot of talk about finding a brokerage that offers training and mentorship from more senior agents, but isn't that completely counterproductive for the senior agent? To create competition?

Originally posted by @Carl Ohai :

I am starting the license course, and will be ready to start finding a broker to work with by the beginning of the year.

1. How does the broker dole out leads that walk into the door? Suppose a person just walks into a Century 21 to start looking for a house, how does the broker decide who gets that lead?

2. How much does the broker control, or limit, the online marketing of their agents? Are agents allowed to funnel traffic to their own website instead of their broker's?

3. There is a lot of talk about finding a brokerage that offers training and mentorship from more senior agents, but isn't that completely counterproductive for the senior agent? To create competition?


 1. It depends on their setup. There is no "in general," anything you can imagine, someone is doing.

2. One you want to work with should be ensuring you are compliant, but otherwise getting out of your way and letting you do what you want.

3. No, it's not counterproductive. As you grow, you should be negotiating with your broker for a better split, specifically to ensure (for both you and them) that what you describe isn't what happens. After they train you up, give them a year or two to profit off of your increased production they helped you achieve, that's just fair and good karma. Then, over time, their % decreases and yours increases. If they are still making a few honest bucks on their investment in you a decade after training you up, don't begrudge them for that. If they are trying to be greedy after 4 years, it's time to move on dot com. Things have a way of balancing themselves. 

Originally posted by @Chris Mason :
Originally posted by @Carl Ohai:

I am starting the license course, and will be ready to start finding a broker to work with by the beginning of the year.

1. How does the broker dole out leads that walk into the door? Suppose a person just walks into a Century 21 to start looking for a house, how does the broker decide who gets that lead?

2. How much does the broker control, or limit, the online marketing of their agents? Are agents allowed to funnel traffic to their own website instead of their broker's?

3. There is a lot of talk about finding a brokerage that offers training and mentorship from more senior agents, but isn't that completely counterproductive for the senior agent? To create competition?

 1. It depends on their setup. There is no "in general," anything you can imagine, someone is doing.

2. One you want to work with should be ensuring you are compliant, but otherwise getting out of your way and letting you do what you want.

3. No, it's not counterproductive. As you grow, you should be negotiating with your broker for a better split, specifically to ensure (for both you and them) that what you describe isn't what happens. After they train you up, give them a year or two to profit off of your increased production they helped you achieve, that's just fair and good karma. Then, over time, their % decreases and yours increases. If they are still making a few honest bucks on their investment in you a decade after training you up, don't begrudge them for that. If they are trying to be greedy after 4 years, it's time to move on dot com. Things have a way of balancing themselves. 

 With respect to 3.) what I meant by counterproductive is that if I work with another agent, is that agent not creating another competitor, at least a potential one?

Originally posted by @Carl Ohai :
Originally posted by @Chris Mason:
Originally posted by @Carl Ohai:

I am starting the license course, and will be ready to start finding a broker to work with by the beginning of the year.

1. How does the broker dole out leads that walk into the door? Suppose a person just walks into a Century 21 to start looking for a house, how does the broker decide who gets that lead?

2. How much does the broker control, or limit, the online marketing of their agents? Are agents allowed to funnel traffic to their own website instead of their broker's?

3. There is a lot of talk about finding a brokerage that offers training and mentorship from more senior agents, but isn't that completely counterproductive for the senior agent? To create competition?

 1. It depends on their setup. There is no "in general," anything you can imagine, someone is doing.

2. One you want to work with should be ensuring you are compliant, but otherwise getting out of your way and letting you do what you want.

3. No, it's not counterproductive. As you grow, you should be negotiating with your broker for a better split, specifically to ensure (for both you and them) that what you describe isn't what happens. After they train you up, give them a year or two to profit off of your increased production they helped you achieve, that's just fair and good karma. Then, over time, their % decreases and yours increases. If they are still making a few honest bucks on their investment in you a decade after training you up, don't begrudge them for that. If they are trying to be greedy after 4 years, it's time to move on dot com. Things have a way of balancing themselves. 

 With respect to 3.) what I meant by counterproductive is that if I work with another agent, is that agent not creating another competitor, at least a potential one?

 Yes, potentially. That's why, if they are smart, they will do what it takes to keep you in their world. 

So is the "mentor" usually the broker (called a principal broker here in Oregon)? I always thought the "mentor" was usually a higher-selling agent in the same brokerage, not the broker themselves.

Originally posted by @Carl Ohai :

So is the "mentor" usually the broker (called a principal broker here in Oregon)? I always thought the "mentor" was usually a higher-selling agent in the same brokerage, not the broker themselves.

 Two different types of relationships. 

"Mentor" in terms of higher selling agent is just one that hands you the leads they don't want to deal with. Maybe they only work with sellers, for example, so you get their buyer leads. They take a cut of the action, since ultimately it's their action and you are being spoon fed. 

The more traditional setup, which you alluded to, is a managing broker. Typically they will offer some training etc, and you're a little more on your own, less spoon feeding.

I got my license in May, 2019. I joined Keller Williams because of the reputation for their training for new agents. But since then, I have fell in love with the company. Everyone is willing to help other agents succeed. I have a coach who I can contact at anytime of the day. It doesn't feel like im competing with anyone. Just myself. :)