Online Real Estate Attorney?

2 Replies

Has anyone ever signed up for the Platinum Membership on Anderson Advisors?
http://andersonadvisors.com/platinum_membership/

Seems like a steal for $35, especially with the unlimited attorney consultations and contract reviews.  My current attorney allows me to shoot him an e-mail if I have a question once in a while, but I feel bad if I e-mail him too much (and afraid that he might start charging me his $300/hr rate).

I don't know much about this company other than it is Clint Coons' (who was a speaker at the BP 2012 Summit) law firm.  I'm always a little wary of national firms, but it seems like he's local to my area (Tacoma is about 40 minutes from where I live in Seattle).

Medium artboard 1 4xNghi Le, Radiant Team, LLC | [email protected]

For $35 you can't go wrong really, I'd question unlimited consultation, there may be a para legal pounding the keyboard.

We have an internet divorce attorney here, but a simple divorce is easier than most RE transactions, I have experience in both (LOL), the difficulty I see is that when people ask a question they never include all the factors that may effect a better answer. Details can be important and if you don't know what to include you're not going to get the best advice. 

I always suggest you look to the motivations of others dealing in real estate advice, that goes for attorneys as well. Look deep. Those that take the guru road as if they are giving legal advice are really shadow players, they may give you some loophole opinion but it's not necessarily legal advice. Some need their bar license revoked.

Ask a few questions and then get a second opinion, vet their advice before you bet on it.

Good luck 

Medium logoscopiccroppedblue2Bill Gulley, General Real Estate Academy | https://generalrealestateacademy.com

I have to wonder about what the liability of those giving online legal advice might be. After all most attorneys give their advice verbally, and it is hard to prove that they said something in exactly the phrasing that you say they did. They can say (or maybe you truly did) that you left out a key word or phrase that changes their liability completely. But if you have an email, or text from a chat, you have proof. Do they accept liability, or do they have such major disclaimers that it is totally worthless as true legal advice? 

I have only been involved in one lawsuit as a defendant, and "lost" but had the judgement paid by the lawyer's insurance because I could prove he gave bad legal advice. But he was stupid enough to do so in email instead of verbally.