International Building Code

8 Replies

That's the 2012 version.  Few cities are likely to have adopted that, yet.  That does look correct, though, with just a quick look.  I have a hardcopy of the one in common use here, which is 2006.

Thanks, fellas. Just to clarify - this code is national and different cities/regions adopt requirements as they see fit? For example, Washington, DC will pull in specific codes but leave others out as they see fit, correct?

@Jon Holdman  - if most cities haven't adopted this yet, what are they pulling from instead? An older version?

Every city adopts their own codes.  This code is NOT used in every city.  Its one of several published codes.  It also only applies to larger buildings.  Many cities here use the "International Residential Code" for one and two unit buildings.  Cities pass an ordinance to adopt specific codes.  These ordinances may also specify specific code parameters.  Snow load, for example.  And cities may add their own requirements.  For example around here many older houses had their roofs decked with 1x8 dimensional lumber instead of plywood or OSB.  Cities require that when re-roofing if there is any gap anywhere in those boards that's over 1/2" you must redeck the entire roof with plywood or OSB.  Call your building department and ask what code they use and which edition.

Originally posted by @Colin L. :

yes, 2012 is the current version of the IBC.

 And the 2015 draft for both the IBC and IRC are out for review.

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Originally posted by @Jon Holdman :

 For example around here many older houses had their roofs decked with 1x8 dimensional lumber instead of plywood or OSB.  Cities require that when re-roofing if there is any gap anywhere in those boards that's over 1/2" you must redeck the entire roof with plywood or OSB.  Call your building department and ask what code they use and which edition.

Jon:  

Out of curiosity, are you required to re-deck if you are (re)applying shakes or metal roofing?  Most of the gapped-planked roofs on older buildings here were purposely spaced that way as either cedar shakes or metal roofing was being applied.   If you are sticking with metal roofing, then you do not have to re-deck ... though, depending on how the attic space is are sealed and insulated, you may wish to anyway ... not to mention the acoustic benefits.

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@Roy N. no idea.  When I've ran into this issue I was just going back with composite shingles.  I also found out that while "code upgrade" coverage in an insurance policy covered this for my house it wouldn't cover it for a detached garage.

Thanks for your responses - all good stuff. I'll contact the DC building department and check in with them about local regulations. 

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