What kind of flooring are you using in your rentals?

42 Replies

Originally posted by @Billy Daniel :

Locking floating type because its easier to pull one or two damaged planks up to replace.

We have used that kind on the last serval projects. Someone was telling me a while back that if one of the pieces was damaged you would have to pull up a whole section. I sure hope they were wrong. 

I’m with @Jim K. I refinish /patch the existing wood whenever possible. Because it’s just labor - I already have the wood! And it looks great and can be refinished every few tenants. Tile in kitchens and baths. With that being said I have occasionally used vinyl plank when the wood floor was too patched up already and/or the existing subfloor was not good enough for tile and I wasn’t willing to do work required to tile properly. But even in those instances I am planning to do it right at a later date.

Originally posted by @Max T. :

I’m with @Jim K. I refinish /patch the existing wood whenever possible. Because it’s just labor - I already have the wood! And it looks great and can be refinished every few tenants. Tile in kitchens and baths. With that being said I have occasionally used vinyl plank when the wood floor was too patched up already and/or the existing subfloor was not good enough for tile and I wasn’t willing to do work required to tile properly. But even in those instances I am planning to do it right at a later date.

Absolutely nothing else is as tough as 3/4" American white oak after its been finished in three coats of oil-based polyurethane. The problem is that it costs $5 a square foot to buy the flooring and while it takes some skill and specialized tools to install it, it takes a good deal more to sand, seal, and finish it well, and even more to replace any parts that get visibly damaged. If you have the skills and tools you'll need in your pocket, it's worth using it on flooring. You will almost never do well paying a third party to do it.

You're in the same boat with the skill, tools, and patience to correctly install floor tile. The problem is that you simply cannot trust anyone else to do a floor tile job if you can't do it yourself, unless you're big enough to have a dedicated tile guy and somebody to constantly check up on him on your payroll. Paying someone on contract for durable tiling using modern methods never, ever, ever works out over the very long haul. But if you can do the sort of methodical, superb job I'm talking about, you end up with a floor that's extremely hard to damage and even easier to fix than a wood floor. 

I have run the gamut. 1st couple rehabs I used .79 cent per sq.ft Home Depot laminate. Lakeshore pecan, I believe.

Then I did 2 units in the vinyl with adhesive  strips.

Now I use beautiful Lifeproof sterling oak, used in 2 units so far. (I use this in our personal units as well. It just jumped .40 cents a sq.ft.!

The 6 year old lakeshore pecan still gets a lot of compliments and doesn't show any signs of wear- looks like it did day one. But it was a pain in the *** to work with compared with the others.

The adhesive, again, held up fine- but it is to thin for the upstairs units. I wouldn't use again.

I have about $5k of the lifeproof that I am shipping overseas for a project. I bought it before the price hike I figured was coming. That is how much I love the stuff.

When contractors in Europe see it they can't believe it- their best is quite thinner.

But again- lakeshore pecan has paid the best dividends 👍

Originally posted by @Patrick M. :

I have run the gamut. 1st couple rehabs I used .79 cent per sq.ft Home Depot laminate. Lakeshore pecan, I believe.

Then I did 2 units in the vinyl with adhesive  strips.

Now I use beautiful Lifeproof sterling oak, used in 2 units so far. (I use this in our personal units as well. It just jumped .40 cents a sq.ft.!

The 6 year old lakeshore pecan still gets a lot of compliments and doesn't show any signs of wear- looks like it did day one. But it was a pain in the *** to work with compared with the others.

The adhesive, again, held up fine- but it is to thin for the upstairs units. I wouldn't use again.

I have about $5k of the lifeproof that I am shipping overseas for a project. I bought it before the price hike I figured was coming. That is how much I love the stuff.

When contractors in Europe see it they can't believe it- their best is quite thinner.

But again- lakeshore pecan has paid the best dividends 👍

Where are you buying your Lakeshore pecan flooring? 

Lakeshore Pecan

Adhesive backed - Traffick master Khaki Oak or Brushed Oak

This is the lifeproof that we installed in our place oversees. (it was still being worked on- hence the blue film ;)

One or rentals with the Lifeproof

@Patrick M.

I get such a kick out of the hypocrisy of these names...how is the photographed wood grain of the a pecan tree planted on the shore of a lake different from the photographed wood grain of a pecan tree planted in a treated-sewage-fertilized field by a ditch? But when it comes times to sell flooring, the American consumer will still shell out for "Lakeshore Pecan" more readily than they would for "Mystery Pecan."

@Joe S. Luxury waterproof vinyl planks, they look like hardwood in the kitchen. Basic black and white tiles in the bathrooms and dark colored carpets (Light Brown) in the bedroom and living rooms.

Originally posted by @Michael Williams :

@Joe S. Luxury waterproof vinyl planks, they look like hardwood in the kitchen. Basic black and white tiles in the bathrooms and dark colored carpets (Light Brown) in the bedroom and living rooms.

Do you use the locking floating floor or the glue down? 

Just finished a kitchen with Home Decorators Collection Luxury VP on sale $1.60 sqft, with Eco Cork Foam underlayment $.79 sqft. This combo worked really well over an uneven floor, and the underlayment added a noticeable thermal break from the cold, uninsulated basement below.

Originally posted by @Joe S. : Glue down
Originally posted by @Michael Williams:

@Joe S. Luxury waterproof vinyl planks, they look like hardwood in the kitchen. Basic black and white tiles in the bathrooms and dark colored carpets (Light Brown) in the bedroom and living rooms.

Do you use the locking floating floor or the glue down?