Which is it: upstairs vs. ground floor means a discount?

13 Replies

I always thought upstairs was at a premium because you don't have to put up with noises above you, but now most apartments I want to rent are telling me ground floor is ata premium because you don't have to "move up and down a lot"

I'm thoroughly confused.

I'd say it depends on the market. In my area (Central MA) people typically don't want to walk up and down stairs so I get more for a one bedroom on the first floor than I do for a one bedroom on the third floor. In a different market with a nice view from the upper levels you may get more such as near a beach. Personally I've never had somebody tell me they want to move from a first floor to a second floor because of the noise factor.

@Daniel R. I haven't found a significant difference in how much tenants value the upper vs. lower. You'll find some will have a preference for one or the other, but as far as establishing a rent value I haven't seen much of a difference, at least in my market.

Originally posted by @Rob Beland :
Personally I've never had somebody tell me they want to move from a first floor to a second floor because of the noise factor.

Now that's interesting: check this review out:


We live on the first floor as well and the floorboards creak like a pirate ship deck. Even after the complex tried to fix it the noise is still unlivable. I can hear every step taken like it's happening inside my head. I have SEVERAL VIDEOS that capture the horrendous noise and would be happy to send them your way if you are thinking about moving in here.


The first month we moved in a master bedroom wall needed to be ripped out because of mold. The floorboards needed to be replaced because of mold. There is random flooding in the guest bathroom that their maintenance can't find the source of. Cabinet doors just come off because the fasteners can't hold them in place. And the walls/ceiling are so thin we searched the house for hours looking for a rogue cell phone vibrating, only to later figure out it was the neighbors.


Do you think this is wild exaggeration?

It sounds like a tenant that has many issues and will likely continue to have issues with whatever property she moves into. I have had people complain about their upstairs neighbors being loud and complain about kids upstairs crying, etc... They complain, I speak with the tenant upstairs about it. They never ask me if they can move upstairs though. The people on the upper levels typically see me and ask if I have any first floors opening up soon so they don't have to climb the stairs every day.

I f I am a landlord, downstairs pays a premium because they don't have to climb stairs. Upstairs pays a premium becuase they get a better view. The middle floor pays a premium becuase it is the perfect compromise.

If I am a tenant the first floor gets a discount becuase. . . well you get the idea.

It's all about negotiation.

Originally posted by @Ned Carey :

It's all about negotiation.

Spoken like a true businessman.

Speaking about negotiations: http://www.biggerpockets.com/forums/52/topics/124342-fha-rules-does-not-allow-one-off-discounts-or-negotiate-lower-rents

Some want upstairs, some downstairs. No one wants to pay a premium for one or the other, at least here, they just say call back when you have a 1st /2nd floor. Everyone downstairs wants to know who is living upstairs. The people upstairs don't really care who lives downstairs. I think the only floor I personally would not want is the middle of a triple decker...

Originally posted by @Colleen F. :
I think the only floor I personally would not want is the middle of a triple decker...

Why not? If either way does not matter, logically, why should the middle one?

@Daniel R. personally I think you don't get the best of anything on the middle level you get the stairs and the noise overhead. I used to live in a triple decker years ago and was glad to have the top unit. Hot in the summer but my reward was not listening to anyone. I also liked the privacy, no one going past my unit but that's me.

Originally posted by @Colleen F. :
I think the only floor I personally would not want is the middle of a triple decker...

You can sell that one on lower heating/cooling costs.

It's all personal preference for the tenants and some don't care and others really want the privacy of being off the ground floor and others hate going up and down stairs, especially older people or really large people. I don't discount anything and it's just a matter of finding the tenant that wants what you have.

@Colleen F. plus with an upper unit you have warm floors that someone else is paying to heat!

I never thought about the heat aspect. I don't like the middle unit but it is good to think about selling points for those units you don't like yourself.

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