Rain Showers

13 Replies

Do any of you like rain showers? The shower head in the middle of the ceiling?

I have a new rental with a rain shower and I personally never liked it but heard a few people say it may be popular to female tenants.

I think I don't like it because the large 12" diameter heads usually requires a larger flow rate to make it a nice shower and you don't have the option of installing a hand shower diverter, unless you reconfigure your pipes behind the tiles to install a full blown diverter.

Is it a plus or a minus in a rental?

@Sam Leon I'd say the plus/minus favor depends on the price point of the rental. Anything under $3000/month for an apartment or $5000/month for SFR I wouldn't bother, since 99.9% of the population lives with a standard wall-type shower head anyway.

Rain showers, body sprays, etc look great, but are definitely pricey, luxury features that should be reserved for pricey, luxury rentals.

And while I'm sure "the ladies" may like the rain shower, I do also know that my wife's #1 complaint about showers is lack of water pressure (too low, and shampoo becomes really hard to rinse out).

In a mid- to lower-end property, it's just more plumbing to maintain or replace. It goes across the ceiling - more opportunity for leaks. Yes, it looks fancy & shiny like the ones on tv, but the few times I've used them, they are kind of like one of those "camp" showers when you're out in the middle of nowhere - kind of dribbly.

Originally posted by @Leon D. :
Sam Leon I'd say the plus/minus favor depends on the price point of the rental. Anything under $3000/month for an apartment or $5000/month for SFR I wouldn't bother, since 99.9% of the population lives with a standard wall-type shower head anyway.
Rain showers, body sprays, etc look great, but are definitely pricey, luxury features that should be reserved for pricey, luxury rentals.

And while I'm sure "the ladies" may like the rain shower, I do also know that my wife's #1 complaint about showers is lack of water pressure (too low, and shampoo becomes really hard to rinse out).

I agree.

In this situation, the bathroom has an existing rain shower installation which I am considering to remove and put in a regular wall mounted head.

A rain shower has to be large diameter to achieve the rain effect, which is always going to result in lower pressure. Takes longer to rinse, have to step into the middle to be "rained on“?once water is off the stored water in that large head continues to empty, and no good way to tee in a hand shower.

I know many will go "wow nice" but very few end up liking the feature from past experiences.

That's why I am thinking of taking it out, opening the wall in the adjacent room, drill a hole through the wall tile and solder in a 90 elbow.

duplicate post.
duplicate post.
Originally posted by @Sam Leon :

In this situation, the bathroom has an existing rain shower installation which I am considering to remove and put in a regular wall mounted head.

A rain shower has to be large diameter to achieve the rain effect, which is always going to result in lower pressure. Takes longer to rinse, have to step into the middle to be "rained on“?once water is off the stored water in that large head continues to empty, and no good way to tee in a hand shower.

I know many will go "wow nice" but very few end up liking the feature from past experiences.

That's why I am thinking of taking it out, opening the wall in the adjacent room, drill a hole through the wall tile and solder in a 90 elbow.

If there are no problems with it and the rest of the bathroom matches (i.e. higher end finishes) I would definitely leave it in there. I've got both a larger rain-type shower head and a hand-held nozzle in my bathroom and I love the rain head (I don't even mess with the mounted/hand-held one). As others mentioned, it is more of a luxury type feature that I would not install in any normal rental. But if you've already got it, why would you get rid of it unless it detracts from getting the place rented?

Medium logoMichael Seeker MBA, Renting502 | http://www.Renting502.com | Podcast Guest on Show #94

let me tell you why ladies HATE those. really simple.

women do NOT wash their hair every time they are in the shower. it takes them too long to fix it and if it's late they just want to shower. if you have a rain head, you ARE washing that hair no matter what you try to do.

another reason, to see what you are doing, you need to step outside the rain or your eyes will be flooded with water.

do they look good? hell, yes.

practical? hell no.

The thing that bothers me is it is the only shower head in that shower.

I think rain shower is meant to be an option. Use the regular wall shower or a rain shower, using a diverter. That's why I don't quiet think it would work. Added to that the nipple extending out of the ceiling is not strapped down, I can push 4" or so of the pipe into the ceiling. I would like to have some wood backing and put in a drop ear 90 and screw that in, then thread the nipple or arm into it. It would take me about the same amount of time to rectify that, verus to open up the bedroom wall on the other side and cut the pipe, and put in a connection for a wall shower arm. Once that's done I can mount a diverter valve onto the end of the shower arm, then mount a shower head, as well as a hose to a wall mount hand shower.

Never installed one in a rental, but for the flow rate concern:

Most shower heads these days have flow restrictors in them to save water.

Removing the flow restrictor, if it has one, should solve your water flow issue.

A quick google search will yield plenty of guides on how to remove it.

I don't think I would remove the flow restrictor if water is a landlord expense though...

Medium sunbase logoJesse Tsai, Sunbase Homes | [email protected] | 7023243426 | http://sunbasehomes.com | NV Agent # S.180768

Originally posted by @Jesse Tsai :
Never installed one in a rental, but for the flow rate concern:
Most shower heads these days have flow restrictors in them to save water.

Removing the flow restrictor, if it has one, should solve your water flow issue.

A quick google search will yield plenty of guides on how to remove it.

I don't think I would remove the flow restrictor if water is a landlord expense though...

It is not a flow rate concern, it is the nature of rain showers. Instead of a standard say 4" diameter head with may be 12 holes, and most modern day heads have different settings by adjusting a lever, you have a 12", 16" head with literally hundreds of holes, the reduction of pressure is by design. I am familiar with flow restrictors, but that wouldn't improve performance in this context because rain showers are designed and meant to operate that way.

I keep seeing them on all of the HGTV makeover shows -- so my thought is people might THINK they want them because it's the trendy new thing for bathrooms, but once they use it they might hate it.

Originally posted by @Kris Taylor :
I keep seeing them on all of the HGTV makeover shows -- so my thought is people might THINK they want them because it's the trendy new thing for bathrooms, but once they use it they might hate it.

When Expo Design Center the high end Home Depot stores go out of business I bought a bunch of stuff there at 90 to 95% discount.

Most useful were dozens of stop valves, high end solid brass fancy turn handles in various finishes they were listed at $95 a piece I got them for $3 a PAIR, 90% off from already discounted price.

I also got a Kohler rain shower jet combo thing. A single 3/4" inlet to a squared housing with four shower heads each rotatable tiltable, meant to mount as a rain shower in the ceiling but user adjustable. It was over $1000, I thought it was interesting so I paid I think $75 for it. Have not installed it, been sitting in my garage for many years. I once called Kohler and they said each of the four heads need 5+ gpm or some such numbers. 4 heads would need 20 gpm. I would double check the specs but what it boils down to us even if you run 3/4" hot supply lines there, you cannot get that flow rate, and even if you can, a water heater with say 50 gallon capacity would not last more than 5 minutes before depletion. I told their tech support this is just an ok nsane spec.

Looks nice though. I might put that on a flip one day LOL.