Industrial Vinyl Tile Flooring in Rentals?

12 Replies

Hi all
I'm about to rehab my next rental. It's lower income than the one I currently have. I want to make the floors as tenant proof as possible. Has anyone tried using industrial vinyl tile flooring? It actually looks quite nice and neutral. I was going to go with ceramic tile but more than one contractor and fellow landlord told me it was not worth the money.

I am thinking that I will supply the new tenants with some inexpensive area rugs for the bedrooms and put this vinyl throughout the whole house. They can ruin the rugs, no problem, and the floors should hold up well to heavy wear and tear. Thoughts?

Their are some landlords on here that have used VCT on their rentals and are happy because it is almost bullet proof. Now I would only install this on very very low end rental as in the lowest in your market.

What is market rent in your area and what are you looking to charge for your unit?

Who are you going to market your unit too people who are on government assistance?

@Richelle T.  

@Eddie T.
The home is in a nice, low income working class neighborhood. This is far from the lowest of the low. Rents will be $650-750.

There is currently very old, worn and torn 1970s burgundy vinyl in the home's kitchen, hall and laundry. Carpet in the bedrooms. I have a friend from my local REIA who owns a home on the next street. His advice was to extend the transition piece to cover the tear and leave it as is. I would like to update it from the burgundy and navy mishmash there now. I don't want to over improve though

Eddie T.
The home is in a nice, low income working class neighborhood. This is far from the lowest of the low. Rents will be $650-750.

There is currently very old, worn and torn 1970s burgundy vinyl in the home's kitchen, hall and laundry. Carpet in the bedrooms. I have a friend from my local REIA who owns a home on the next street. His advice was to extend the transition piece to cover the tear and leave it as is. I would like to update it from the burgundy and navy mishmash there now. I don't want to over improve though

HUD fair market rent for 3 bedroom in the county is $1000

Traffic Master Allure Ultra Vinyl Plank flooring is our current favorite product to use. It looks like a hardwood floor, but is much more durable. There are many types of vinyl tiles and planks. Some stick together with overlapping adhesive and some snap together. We tried the stick together floor tiles and they were a bit more difficult to get down straight, without gaps.  We prefer the Allure Ultra because it snaps together, can be taken apart if necessary and is 100% waterproof. Take a look at this video. Great for a wide variety of home styles.... A, B, C or maybe even D properties. We put this down in the entry way, kitchens and laundry of four of our units and are considering it for the entire unit, living rooms, bedrooms, and bathrooms too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-5dx3O2qRc

Marcia Maynard, Fischer Properties | Podcast Guest on Show #83

I agree with @Marcia Maynard  on vinyl click together planks.

We found the same type of product on sale at lumber liquidator but they charge a restocking fee and oversold me a couple boxes to begin with...  Next time I will probably go back to Home Depot and get Allure (we have a HD credit account now and they give you a 5% discount if you show a Lowes credit card)

Another vote for the Allure Ultra Vinyl planks. They look good, were easy to install and are extremely durable. Similar to Marcia's experience the sticky planks took some practice getting used to and even then if you lay one crooked your whole floor could be off. So while they're more expensive I'd suggest the Allure Ultra (Click lock) over the plain Allure (sticky) planks.

Armstrong VCT is awesome stuff. I have it in my house in the guest bath, think it is super hip looking with some cheapo Ikea fixtures. I think it cost about $40 bucks to do the floor in that bath

Richelle, if the flooring is functional but just ugly, I'd consider leaving it and earmarking the funds to upgrade it after a tenant or two, or as a retention bonus for a good tenant.  Nice flooring with a wow factor may rent your place a little faster, but I'd wait until it is ruined before spending needless money.  I am in the lowest of low income and the Allure flooring has not held up against our tenants, but you would likely have better luck.

We've used Lumber Liquidator 4mm Vinyl Planks and like them. Waterproof but look like wood flooring. Click type. Lowes and Home Depot have their versions. The thicker 4mm and 5mm click type are the best but are not that cheap, especially when you factor in underlayment, but probably would hold up better than carpet. Best thing to do is get tenants that take care of the place. Establish some housekeeping standards. Good luck.

Thank you everyone for the feedback! I will check out the Allure Ultra and Lumbar Liquidator products.

@Richelle T.   I would look for LVT/P (Luxury Vinyl Tile/Plank) at your local flooring store before going to Lowes or HD.  They will work much harder to keep your business and should have options at all price levels.  And, if you buy something they have in stock, they should not charge you a restock fee to take a box back.

Remember to keep an extra box at the house...just in case of repairs that may be needed down the road.  Like most products, flooring "flavors" will be discontinued at some point in the future.

Good luck!!

@Gerald David  thanks for the tip!

@Peter Jordan   I was thinking about the Armstrong VCT. I'm afraid that the house will look like a shopping center instead of a home. It's pretty rock solid flooring  hence my attraction to it.