Install gas line and new gas stove???

11 Replies

Hi all,

We just renovated a home in a nice neighborhood.  We got a renter for $1,300 a month.  She asked about a gas stove.  We just got a gas line and a new furnace.  Should we put in a gas line for her and buy a gas stove?  We have an electric one there( brand new ) but I could put the new stove into another rental we own.  We had 3 people ask about a gas stove while showing the house.  I'm thinking it may pay off in the long run and attract the kind of renters we want.  It would cost $300-400 dollars to put the gas line in plus the new gas stove.   

Thanks for your input. 

Sally

I'd say no, but that's me

Did you have a hard time renting it as is?

How firm is the $300-$400 cost? Are you estimating, or did you get an estimate from some one?

Are you going to have to bust up an walls to get the lines in?

I'd put one in if they pay for the stove and install and sign a statement agreeing no compensation from the landlord and the changes stay with the property regardless. Or you could install and raise the rent an amount on par with your desired payback period.

A new gas stove usually runs just the $300 to $400 you stated, so teeing off the existing line, adding a shut off for the stove, and piping the stove will all cost a bit more. Unless you meant to say a used gas stove in the first place ...

This is the sort of thing that my lease renewal letter would have as option #3 for renewal, where I give the tenant a choice to get something they want to entice them to renew (and bump that rent up of course). Options 1 & 2 are to renew at different durations for different monthly rents. 

We added a gas line/range on a house we purchased and were glad we did. In our area, a gas range is desirable and will attract more applicants and better quality tenants. Also, sets your rental apart from the competition, which can result in a longer tenancy. If you can afford it, I don't see a downside.

Ive also heard tenants saying gas lines are desirable and make for lower bills so if you could afford it I believe it will pay its self off on down the line IMO.

I wouldn't. If it ain't broke don't fix it. Maybe down he road when the stove needs replacing but not in this situation unless you need it to get tenants.

You had 3 people ask and this seems like the 4th. What is in your market? Will this give you an advantage? Sounds like it won't hurt.

One way we do upgrades is that, if the tenant wants them, we try to work the cost of labor for the upgrade into their lease through a mutual agreement. The cost of the stove I would say you would eat because you have a use for your electric, but have them pay for the line install.

One example of this was when I visited a long distance tenant on a multi year lease to inspect the house and make sure they were happy and that the house was in decent shape. I found that they had run a coax cable across the stairs to provide cable into an unwired room. I immediately removed it and told them they could not do this, but that I would set up my electrician to come out to wire the room if they paid for it. 

They agreed and they are happy and I am happy too.

The cost in your case are a bit more significant, but I would still try and make them happy by having it installed where they pay for the gas line and you pay for the stove.

I hope that helps.

Originally posted by @Sally Oase :

Hi all,

We just renovated a home in a nice neighborhood.  We got a renter for $1,300 a month.  She asked about a gas stove.  We just got a gas line and a new furnace.  Should we put in a gas line for her and buy a gas stove?  We have an electric one there( brand new ) but I could put the new stove into another rental we own.  We had 3 people ask about a gas stove while showing the house.  I'm thinking it may pay off in the long run and attract the kind of renters we want.  It would cost $300-400 dollars to put the gas line in plus the new gas stove.   

Thanks for your input. 

Sally

 It sounds like this will cost you roughly $1,000.  So, I would not do this for free.  That is a major thing for a tenant to ask you to do.  If you do this for free, what's next?  In my experience a tenant with the cojones to ask for a $1,000 renovation, won't stop there.

So, what I would do, is sit down with the tenant and explain that doing this will cost you $1,000.  And then give them some options, like @Steve Babiak (gack I hate it when the hashtag thing won't work LOL) said.

Like well, this will cost $1,000, so I'll need you to make it worth my while to do and to help cover the cost.  I could raise your rent by $83/month to pay for it over a year's time.  Or, you could sign a new 2 year contract for only $35 more per month (or whatever you can think of).  But, basically, you need to get them to see that it won't be free and they will have to give something to get something.  In my opinion.

That way, when they want you to install the jacuzzi, they'll think about what they're willing to pay or do to get it :-)

I say no, you have a NEW working electric service for the stove.  If they want a gas stove they can go somewhere else, or buy their own home and put a gas line in for a stove.  Never let a tenant dictate what you provide, if you start off your relationship with them by being very hospitable and providing extra things THEY desire, I believe this sets you up for them to subconsciously have a feeling of superiority over you.  You give a tenant an inch, they take a mile, I don't care what economic class their in.

Plain and simple, this is what you are providing, no more no less.  The type of stove they can use is hardly a deal breaker in my opinion. 

Thanks you everyone for the advice.  = )