Bad Idea? - Rental Next to Fire Station

8 Replies

I was looking at some properties last week and happened to see one right next to a fire station.  That got me thinking about what effect something like that would have on the ability to rent out units considering the potential for noise.  Does anyone have experienced then can share trying to rent out units next to fire stations, police stations, and hospitals where you might be getting loud noises at all hours.  I'm thinking maybe depressed rents, long vacancies, maybe some more unusual types of tenants that would be okay with that.  But I'm just speculating.  I wonder if anyone could share their experiences.  Thanks.

Lower fire insurance .  If the price is right everything rents to someone .  There are plenty of houses near rr tracks , businesses , airports , you get use to it..

So just make a lower offer to justify these risks

I have a house right next to a RR track. I thought it might be a problem but the tenants, and neighbors, tell me they don't even notice the train going by. It is gone in about a minute and it's not real loud inside the house. I suspect the fire station is the same issue. 

@Matthew Paul  Thanks for the input.  That's sort of along the lines of what I was thinking and could find from Googling.  But I wasn't sure how low the adjustment would need to be.  

@Jane A. .  Thanks. Definitely would have to figure into the calculation.  Just trying to get some gauge of how much an issue something like this would be to help estimate the impact.

Originally posted by @JD Martin :

I have a house right next to a RR track. I thought it might be a problem but the tenants, and neighbors, tell me they don't even notice the train going by. It is gone in about a minute and it's not real loud inside the house. I suspect the fire station is the same issue. 

 Thanks JD.  Good to know your experiences.  That's sort of what I see online. A few people can't take it but most by and large get used to it and don't notice.  Asking the neighbors is a good tip to get their input.  Also I've read in some jurisdictions the fire houses don't turn on the sirens right away in the middle of the night as they leave but turn the lights on first and then the sirens once they hit major streets.  So asking the firehouse it's policy is another thing.  That helps with actual effect I think but still leaves a perception problem with newer perspective renters.  

Did you ever buy this property next to the fire station? Just wondering how it went. I'm looking at one right now that looks great other than being right next door to a fire station. 

@Paul Sanders and @Chin P. ,

Firemen need houses too. Especially if it's volunteer, being able to be first in is really a push for some. I was on a volunteer ambulance corps for awhile and I know people who moved closer just so they could respond faster when the tones dropped. Each department and location is different but in our small town if one went up for rent within rock throwing distance there would be several applicants. 

Good Luck!

NOTE: We also had a policy of not hitting the sirens until we reached outside the town. At least not right at this base since there was very little traffic, especially at night.

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