Cost to install new tub in leaking shower sound right?

17 Replies

I have a shower that is leaking when used to the basement downstairs. This is an old leak that I thought was taken care of and apparently is not. So plumber advised that I redo the shower floor. I want to do the job once and its my biggest expense to date with my 1st house hack so I'm really hoping somebody can tell me if this quote sounds right please?

1. Remove shower walls to stud, put new greenboard, new tile.

2. Remove shower tiled floor, fix rotted wood subfloor, install new tub (with greenboard or whatever is used, not really familiar).

3. Replace rotted wood beam in basement under this shower 

4. Put jack in basement for extra support on that floor/beam

Basically its a small tub area that will be new.

Cost: $2000 with materials. 2 days work. 

$2000 is certainly reasonable for a full gut job and reinstall with tile - not including materials.  If it a 3 piece shower system, I would expect it to be cheaper.  The tile work is certainly what takes the most time and a skilled hand. 

After they install the backer board or cement board on the walls, I suggest you insist that they seal it with Redgard.  Then, once that is dry, they can install the tile like normal. It's expensive, but Redgard is the only 100% leak-proof system I've seen. 

http://m.homedepot.com/p/Custom-Building-Products-...

Thank you so much for replying! I'm hoping to put the materials on the Home Depot card so I'll def look for  Redgard. 

I actually had the shower floor retiled by a handyman a few months ago and the walls regrouted but yesterday it was pouring in the basement when the tenant was using the shower! So the plumber suggested ripping everything out and fixing the damage and doing it all new. 

Very overwhelming since it's the biggest repair I've had!

Originally posted by @Sam G. :

Thank you so much for replying! I'm hoping to put the materials on the Home Depot card so I'll def look for  Redgard. 

I actually had the shower floor retiled by a handyman a few months ago and the walls regrouted but yesterday it was pouring in the basement when the tenant was using the shower! So the plumber suggested ripping everything out and fixing the damage and doing it all new. 

Very overwhelming since it's the biggest repair I've had!

I was just there. Our tub crack and we thought we had patched it. It broke while my husband was on deployment. What you were going to describe was $4,500 by my handyman. Instead my husband did everything you described, but I do feel your pain. Sorry you have to ripped it out.

@elizabethcolegrove I am assuming I need a permit for this. It's an emergency situation and today is a holiday so I don't think the city will reply to me today. Not sure what to do about that one. Do you know if I can at least remedy the situation until I get a permit or are permits easy to get? I'm nervous about letting my tenant go without use of the shower for more than 3 days or so, already since I'll have to work around her schedule for somebody to be there when the plumber is. 

I had a similar repair.  In my case, I paid $500 plus parts for demolition of the pan (jackhammer required).  The rest I did myself.  The shower pan had a lead liner that I left intact and just overlaid it with a new PVC liner.  Replaced the old pipes and drain with PVC, added sloped mortar bed, retiled and grouted.  It took me 3 weekends and the tenants were okay with using another shower while this was going on.  It's hard work, but doable and there are lot's of Youtube videos on how to do it.

    That being said, $2000 sounds like a bargain.

Make sure that they use cement board for the tub surround under the tile, not drywall.. The grout will absorb the water and over time the drywall will get wet and eventually begin to fall apart. I just replaced a tub surround and tile that was put together with drywall instead of cement board.

I'll def tell him to use the cement board with the Redgard. Is this used over the plastic sheet or is a plastic sheet necessary on the studs with the cement board? 

You guys have been a great help I appreciate it.

@Sam G. , I wonder if your handyman used premixed mortar? That will just about guarantee leaks. It says you can use it in the shower, but it doesn't work.

Good luck with this in Chicago. Anyplace else you can shower until it's fixed? 

This is actually in a tenant's unit. I told them it will take 3 days and they are ok with that, which makes this a little less stressfull for me.  Hopefully I won't run into any issues that will extend that time. 

I think learning about the process has really helped make it seem less intimidating, especially when the repair makes sense to me and I learn how the house works. 

Would you recommend using a vapor barrier under the cement board if Redgard will be used? I keep reading 2 points of view, including the possible mold sandwich with the vapor barrier.

Just wanted to update everybody on work progress. Demo work was started and almost all the framing behind the walls was completely rotted and have to be replaced. 

I'll definitely post up a few pictures hopefully it can help somebody else in the same situation that may feel overwhelmed as I have been. 

Sam, $2,000 is definitely a steal!  I ran into a similar situation in a house I just purchased.  Instead, I decided to use a 1-piece surround/shower, as I've learned they are less susceptible to leaks.  I don't know if you'll see this in time, but if grout is not done properly, it will leak...over time.  I just don't trust grout/tile showers in rentals.  Just my $.02.  Good luck.

I tend to agree with Erick.  I am a public insurance adjuster and I specialize in water losses.  Grout often leaks.  For most of my investor clients, they tend to go back with the 1-piece surround if possible.  It's a much less expensive and quick fix and it isn't as prone to future leaks down the road.