Tankless water heater

12 Replies

Good day. Winter is coming and it's really annoying. I'm planning to buy a tankless water heater. I checked all of the water heater on Amazon and in this site http://www.elreviews.com/tankless-water-heater-reviews/. There so many choices in there and I'm confused. Please help me with my problem, give me some suggestion and advice on what would be the best water heater that I should buy. Thank you!

I suggest you research on "how they work". They DO NOT heat the water to a certain degree like a conventional water heater. They increase the temp of the incoming water, usually by 40-45 degrees. Lets say you want to take a shower. You turn the hot water on full. Then you turn up the cold to get the temp you want. If someone else turns some hot water on the out going water temp will drop. If you turn down the hot the unit will over heat and shut off, then you have to turn off the hot water to reset the unit and start over. Everything I read said the same thing. There is NO WAY I would ever install one. The are expensive too.

I've got one in my personal house and really like it. No issues and it has been installed for 7 years now. You can set the temp on mine and it cranks out as much water at that temp that you want. Get a gas one because the electric ones won't keep up.

So what should I do to make the water a little bit warmer? I don't have any idea on what to do or what to buy

I don't have any experience with tankless water heaters, but I did check into them a few years ago. I was turned off because the material I was reading said that you had to have multiple heaters in different parts of the house. Now maybe things have changed since then. But that's what I remember about them.

I have a lot of experience with tankless water heaters, both gas and electric. I put them in about half my rehabs.

Pros - takes up less space, more efficient, unlimited hot water

Cons - generally more expensive up front, requires high amperage or a large gas line

Key when buying is to size it right; you’ll see a table on the spec sheet showing how much it will heat water at various flow rates. Take the max concurrent usage of hot water in the house and add that together to figure out what flow rate you need to size for. For example, 2 showers at 2.5gpm each, and 2 faucets at 1.5gpm each would put a house at a peak concurrency of 8gpm. Lookup ground water temp in your area during the coldest time of year, for example 50 degrees. For this example you’d want to find a water heater that is rated to heat 8gpm up by 70 degrees (to get 120 degree water)

You’ll also need to make sure you have either enough electrical amps available (these water heaters can take 60-80 amps) or if gas that you have enough gas volume, often 1/2 in pipe required for the larger units.

A standard gas tank water heater gas line will not have the capacity, and you’ll have to re pipe back to where it’s big enough.

If you know all these things upfront and purchase correctly they are really really great units. I’ve had good experience with both electric and gas Rheem models. An RTE-13 in a studio and an RTG-64DVLN in a 4bed/2bath single family house.

Then I should switch into different product? What would be the useful thing to heat up the water? thanks for suggestions

Originally posted by @Rensell David alejandro :

Then I should switch into different product? What would be the useful thing to heat up the water? thanks for suggestions

 I'm not totally following what you mean by "make it a little warmer"

Is the goal to get a water heater that works for your home, or are you looking to add a small supplemental heater downstream from your existing water heater?

Can you provide more information about the home and current setup? size / current water heater type / # bathrooms and faucets / area of country / etc

I put my first electric hybrid heat pump in almost a year ago and it's already saved me over $250 in electric costs this year. Still runs on the same 220V as my old unit, but much more efficiently. Also dehumidifies the basement. Not sure if you have them in the Philippines but I would highly recommend this style water heater as it would work even more efficiently in your climate.

now it's cleared to me. Thank you for your answers. It really help me a lot to decide what I'm going to buy. Thank you

@Shaun C.

Just curious if you don't mind sharing how much you paid for your electric hybrid water heat pump, and what brand do you have?

I just found out my water heater is leaking, and got quoted $1550 for a 50 gallon Rheem power vent water heater. I'm considering other alternatives.

Originally posted by @Chris T. :

@Shaun C.

Just curious if you don't mind sharing how much you paid for your electric hybrid water heat pump, and what brand do you have?

I just found out my water heater is leaking, and got quoted $1550 for a 50 gallon Rheem power vent water heater. I'm considering other alternatives.

I got mine last December and paid $1300 before a $300 tax credit. Some states/energy suppliers have additional rebates. Mine is an AO Smith and its only 50 gallons, but I can take 3 back to back showers and it still doesn't kick on the resistance heat or run out of hot water. It's a beast. Just logged into my energy app and I'm down 32% since this time last year. 

This style water heater is new, but people have been running heat pumps for years so I hope it runs for a while before needing service. Hope this helps. You'd also be tightening up your building envelope too assuming you are already running gas and can seal up the vent. 

Another thing about on demand is they are usually direct vent, through the wall. If you have an attached row house that can be a problem!

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