Should I be concerned if my tenant slipped in the bathtub?

35 Replies

@Bill Brandt

Yea, the cigarette residual in the air just hits you when you walk into the place. The pictures don't entirely do justice. But yea, being in Vegas, rents have rocketed, so I'm hoping to get an additional $200+/month after all the renovations... new paint, new floors, and new appliances.

But as you said, I'm just thankful she got out of there when she did, and didn't make it that much more difficult. I've heard of plenty of horror stories of tenants just squating indefinitely and the landlord having to now work around the system to get them out..

Some sort of justice must be found in the middle to help both tenants and landlords equally.

I was going to say that looked like a vegas house. I didn’t notice your location after name. 

I had two long term tenants bail on me last year (5 & 7 years) no contact nothing. Just didn’t pay rent and vanished. I couldn’t be mad about about the vanish since they could have camped out for another year. Was more disappointed they didn’t think we’d care after so many years. But those rents increased even more last year. ($1395 to $1950) and ($1125 to $1495)


in my head I simply applied the security deposit towards repairs and pretended I didn’t get rent that month. Luckily we do pretty large security deposits and I only came out of pocket a couple thousand each on top of deposits. Most of it was flooring which after 5-7 years pry needed replacing anyway. 

I do think you’ll be surprised by the rental increase and the tenant quality increase. GL. 

You made several mistakes on this one.  It's important to learn from them and avoid something similar moving forward.  Put systems and processes in place to do so.

One such tidbit:  I do semi-annual walkthrough inspections.  It's written in to the lease, and it gives me an opportunity for direct observation of how the tenant is treating my property.

You win more than you lose has been my experience so far. Hopefully the next tenant will be a better fit.

@Jim K. I recently found that credit bureaus no longer report civil judgements(as of 2017). So this will not show up on credit. However he can likely put it on the credit himself I would assume?

Or is this something that shows up in background checks?

@Bill Brandt

From a previous post suggesting the tenant should go to a elderly home because she is not fit to shower on a tub.

Please, DO NO SUGEST HER GOING TO A ELDERLY HOME!!!! EVER!

It is not your place to sugest where a tenant should live. It looks like she is bluffing, but if a landlord suggest that a tenant is not fit to take a shower on a bathtub because she is old this is reason for a discrimination claim and out of the blue your tenant will actually have a case in her hands.

Originally posted by @Edit B. :

@Jim K. I recently found that credit bureaus no longer report civil judgements(as of 2017). So this will not show up on credit. However he can likely put it on the credit himself I would assume?

Or is this something that shows up in background checks?

Yes. It shows up on most automated background checks. But in my case, I run tenants manually through Allegheny County's computerized court record database: https://dcr.alleghenycounty.us... 

@Luciana W.

perhaps YOU WERE TOO BUSY FREAKING OUT TO READ MY POST!?!?!   
 
What I said was….  

“ I was going to say tell her to look for housing meant for the elderly and infirm since she is no longer capable of using a tub safely. BUT. Really I would do what I did when customers told me they had contacted their lawyer in regards to my computer store. “Ok. My lawyer has advised me that as soon as any customer says they’ve contacted a lawyer I am no longer suppose to talk to them and only deal with their lawyer so please don’t call any more….” “

Maybe you skipped over the “but what I would really do is…” part. I understand you might think comedy is objective and somethings can’t be joked about. But you also assume the OP was not going to understand it was a joke AND not read my entire post AND blindly follow advice from some yahoo on the internet. 

Ps. It was mainly your insane use of the ALL CAPS WHICH IS ANNOYING!!!  That made me reply as I assume everyone else got that I wasn’t suggesting to say that. Either by knowing it was a joke or reading the “but what I would really do is..” part. 

Pps. That post was 14 days ago. It’s certainly too late to warn the OP now. Where were you 2 weeks ago to police the Internet?

@Jeremy Szymankowski   you will even see tubs from the 70's and cast iron tubs still in houses that don't have this non-slip coating. It was actually the ADA that required nonslip around 1990. You can add stick on strips if this is the case. They sell them on amazon. I have them on the older tubs.

Glad you got her out.  Not the old folks home but I have suggested to several tenants where to put their name on lists for senior/affordable housing when they told me the rent raise was unaffordable. 

Originally posted by @Jeremy Szymankowski:

@Bill Brandt

Yea, the cigarette residual in the air just hits you when you walk into the place. The pictures don't entirely do justice. But yea, being in Vegas, rents have rocketed, so I'm hoping to get an additional $200+/month after all the renovations... new paint, new floors, and new appliances.

But as you said, I'm just thankful she got out of there when she did, and didn't make it that much more difficult. I've heard of plenty of horror stories of tenants just squating indefinitely and the landlord having to now work around the system to get them out..

Some sort of justice must be found in the middle to help both tenants and landlords equally.

I question if smoking as the cause too. Early in my landlording career, I rented to smokers. I had tenants chain smoking for years and it never looked like that. Cigarettes produce yellowing. I had a tenant who never smoked a single cigarette, but burned candles and we had black soot just like that. I thought soot from the fire place was the cause when I saw the photos.

If that is a wood burning fire place, I would have it cleaned and inspected. I block off any wood fire places and prohibit use in my properties. Soot damage and fire potential are just not worth the risk.

Also it is worth noting this damage didn't happen in a month, but rather months or years. You need to get in to your properties to inspect for damage/smoking and make sure furnace filers are being changed regularly. A clogged filter like will damage your HVAC.

You mentioned it wasn't worth going after her for $2000, but cleaning, painting and replacing appliances is several thousand dollars of work. You will need to wipe down all those walls before painting. That is a PITA job that will cost more than a regular paint job.